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What would you need to quit your job and become a professional investor?

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Wow - what an interesting exercise to go back and read through the thread.
Obviously a very naive post by myself and worth reflecting on.

The goal of living from investment cash flow is still there, however the plan is far more realistic now. I have carved out a business of trading, firstly by gaining an edge with pairs trading and subsequently by developing/experimenting with various other strategies to supplement in times where pairs doesn't perform. Capital is generated from trading to fund my (still) modest living expenses, with the surplus being allocated to my investment strategy.

Contrary to what many in here said about being bored, I actually find this 'job' very exciting and look forward to Mondays :)
The loneliness issue is certainly real, as is the possibility to take on bad habits as SkyQuake mentioned.

I have found that trading has helped to further instill a value that I have around constant self improvement. Trading requires you to constantly evaluate and improve your process and I think this has certainly driven me to do the same in other areas of my life.

The workaround for loneliness is to force yourself to get involved in online communities and networks. What this lacks in real face-to-face human interaction on a daily basis, somewhat makes up for it in that you are interacting with some of the most motivated and passionate people within the industry...as opposed to potentially someone just showing up for the pay cheque.

Now in my 4th year full time I can say with gratitude that I have been able to get to the stage where I am earning more than I would be if I stayed within my finance profession. The relatively low volatility of equity curve over multiple market conditions combined with a variety of strategies gives me confidence that this is a sustainable business and is not simply based on recent market conditions.
After a year overseas where I managed to keep everything going on 'travel mode', I am motivated and ready to take things to the next level.
Wow - what an interesting exercise to go back and read through the thread.
Obviously a very naive post by myself and worth reflecting on.

The goal of living from investment cash flow is still there, however the plan is far more realistic now. I have carved out a business of trading, firstly by gaining an edge with pairs trading and subsequently by developing/experimenting with various other strategies to supplement in times where pairs doesn't perform. Capital is generated from trading to fund my (still) modest living expenses, with the surplus being allocated to my investment strategy.

Contrary to what many in here said about being bored, I actually find this 'job' very exciting and look forward to Mondays :)
The loneliness issue is certainly real, as is the possibility to take on bad habits as SkyQuake mentioned.

I have found that trading has helped to further instill a value that I have around constant self improvement. Trading requires you to constantly evaluate and improve your process and I think this has certainly driven me to do the same in other areas of my life.

The workaround for loneliness is to force yourself to get involved in online communities and networks. What this lacks in real face-to-face human interaction on a daily basis, somewhat makes up for it in that you are interacting with some of the most motivated and passionate people within the industry...as opposed to potentially someone just showing up for the pay cheque.

Now in my 4th year full time I can say with gratitude that I have been able to get to the stage where I am earning more than I would be if I stayed within my finance profession. The relatively low volatility of equity curve over multiple market conditions combined with a variety of strategies gives me confidence that this is a sustainable business and is not simply based on recent market conditions.
After a year overseas where I managed to keep everything going on 'travel mode', I am motivated and ready to take things to the next level.

Really interesting thread.


Sorry I have only come in towards the end.

What was the path that you took to transition into trading?

Working a job as well as trading or trading external capital how did work out exactly?

thanks
 

skc

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Now in my 4th year full time I can say with gratitude that I have been able to get to the stage where I am earning more than I would be if I stayed within my finance profession. The relatively low volatility of equity curve over multiple market conditions combined with a variety of strategies gives me confidence that this is a sustainable business and is not simply based on recent market conditions.
After a year overseas where I managed to keep everything going on 'travel mode', I am motivated and ready to take things to the next level.

Thanks for the reply mate. Great to see your success and more importantly, finding and enjoying what you do after much personal and professional growth. No doubt there were lots of hard work and commitment involved.

It's a good thread to direct other newcomers if they are going through similar phases.

Obviously a very naive post by myself and worth reflecting on.

Naivety in good dosage might not be a bad thing. I often read about how successful businesses owners reflect on how difficult it was at the beginning... that they were naive thinking it'd be easy and probably wouldn't have started the business if they knew what they know now.

Dreams are made up of vision and ignorance of other inconvenient truths!
 
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Great to read VS and inspiring! Always interesting to read someone's self-reflection and development, because it makes you think more about how you can improve yourself :)
 
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What was the path that you took to transition into trading?

Working a job as well as trading or trading external capital how did work out exactly?
I started out with an interest in investing back in early high-school. But it wasn't until I was in the workforce and realized my personality didn't suit the standard workplace environment that I started pursuing the trading aspect.
In order to get started on the right foot, I did hours and hours of reading on trading strategies and styles. I spent time playing with excel and building trade calculators/trigger sheets. I developed ways to keep track of trades and measure performance. I spent time investigating brokerage firms and deciding on suitable products to trade. In short - I found what suited me/what worked for me, and I figured out how to make it work better.. and that's really what I'm still doing now.

I didn't leave the workforce until I was convinced I had an edge and could at least have 'a chance' at making a full-time living out of trading. At the time I was not convinced making it was a certainty. But at a young age with no commitments and relatively low expenses, it wasn't the end of the world if it failed.

I knew deep down I was never going back to the job I left, but at the time of quitting I hadn't ruled out the possibility of a different job if the trading gig didn't work out.
With that aside, once I had left the job and begun trading full-time there really was no looking back. With all the extra time on my hands to refine my craft, I soon became more in touch with a vision of how exactly I could use trading as my primary source of income.

Dreams are made up of vision and ignorance of other inconvenient truths!
:laugh::xyxthumbs

Great to read VS and inspiring! Always interesting to read someone's self-reflection and development, because it makes you think more about how you can improve yourself :)
I'm glad you've found some value in here Huskar. I know I've had plenty of value from others stories on ASF over the years.
 
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I started out with an interest in investing back in early high-school. But it wasn't until I was in the workforce and realized my personality didn't suit the standard workplace environment that I started pursuing the trading aspect.
In order to get started on the right foot, I did hours and hours of reading on trading strategies and styles. I spent time playing with excel and building trade calculators/trigger sheets. I developed ways to keep track of trades and measure performance. I spent time investigating brokerage firms and deciding on suitable products to trade. In short - I found what suited me/what worked for me, and I figured out how to make it work better.. and that's really what I'm still doing now.

I didn't leave the workforce until I was convinced I had an edge and could at least have 'a chance' at making a full-time living out of trading. At the time I was not convinced making it was a certainty. But at a young age with no commitments and relatively low expenses, it wasn't the end of the world if it failed.

I knew deep down I was never going back to the job I left, but at the time of quitting I hadn't ruled out the possibility of a different job if the trading gig didn't work out.
With that aside, once I had left the job and begun trading full-time there really was no looking back. With all the extra time on my hands to refine my craft, I soon became more in touch with a vision of how exactly I could use trading as my primary source of income.


:laugh::xyxthumbs


I'm glad you've found some value in here Huskar. I know I've had plenty of value from others stories on ASF over the years.


Its threads and posts like this that drew me to ASF.

I am not really into self development help, inspiration etc.
But sometimes you can't help but feel something.
I don't know what else to say.

:xyxthumbs
Thanks
 

Wysiwyg

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The workaround for loneliness is to force yourself to get involved in online communities and networks. What this lacks in real face-to-face human interaction on a daily basis, somewhat makes up for it in that you are interacting with some of the most motivated and passionate people within the industry...as opposed to potentially someone just showing up for the pay cheque.
Some of is quite true. Most are hustlers and sharks pumping stocks and telling everyone how good they are (f.i.g.j.a.m) yet contribute no actual trading activity, evidence or proven strategies to back up their online persona.
Regarding the thread title, a million dollars to buy/hold (invest) income stocks and a million dollars for security and stock purchases when market crashes to insane value levels.
 

tech/a

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Personally I enjoy having a value to society through what I do for a living

Trading is as boring as duck down
Finding an edge and learning the art of trading is a great challenge.

Lack of human contact while trading full time doesn't appeal either.
 
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From a business point of view it's pretty hard to beat.

Unlimited Demand
Unlimited Supply
No limit on capitalisation to the plus side
Is transferable
Very low overheads
Can profit in good bad and ho hum times
Flexible hours
Always learning

I live in a small country town and it still amazes me being able to sit in front of a PC and trade just about any market in any country in the world. The opportunities are endless.
 

Wysiwyg

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I live in a small country town and it still amazes me being able to sit in front of a PC and trade just about any market in any country in the world. The opportunities are endless.
And so are the costs. I would like to do that but monthly Level 2 Exchange streaming real time data fees and news feeds for all markets is substantial. Also costs more to raise the streaming cap. My ultimate plan was to run scans on multiple open cash markets and future markets looking for set ups. That would provide plenty of opportunuities.
 
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