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The Science Thread

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by SirRumpole, Apr 27, 2016.

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  1. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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  2. basilio

    basilio

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    Brain surgery ? It isn't rocket science.. After all the Incas were pretty good at it.

    South America’s Inca civilization was better at skull surgery than Civil War doctors

    By Lizzie WadeJun. 8, 2018 , 11:00 AM

    Cranial surgery without modern anesthesia and antibiotics may sound like a death sentence. But trepanation—the act of drilling, cutting, or scraping a hole in the skull for medical reasons—was practiced for thousands of years from ancient Greece to pre-Columbian Peru. Not every patient survived. But many did, including more than 100 subjects of the Inca Empire. A new study of their skulls and hundreds of others from pre-Columbian Peru suggests the success rates of premodern surgeons there was shockingly high: up to 80% during the Inca era, compared with just 50% during the American Civil War some 400 years later.
    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018...on-was-better-skull-surgery-civil-war-doctors
     
  3. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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    https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-06...lar-system-long-before-humans-came-along.html

     
  4. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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    Ancients of the Milky Way:

    Milkyway.jpg
     
    Knobby22 likes this.
  5. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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    Looks like an ancient milk bottle. A Milky Way alien obviously. :cool:
     
  6. fiftyeight

    fiftyeight

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    Starting the indoctrination process early :D

    IMG_20180714_124949279.jpg
     
    Value Collector likes this.
  7. explod

    explod explod

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    Can you believe these worms came to life again after being frozen for 42,000 years.
    "Worms frozen in permafrost for up to 42,000 years come back to life
    By The Siberian Times reporter
    26 July 2018
    Nematodes moving and eating again for the first time since the Pleistocene age in major scientific breakthrough, say experts.

    [​IMG]
    Awake after 42,000 years... Picture: The Siberian Times

    The roundworms from two areas of Siberia came back to life in Petri dishes, says a new scientific study.

    ‘We have obtained the first data demonstrating the capability of multicellular organisms for longterm cryobiosis in permafrost deposits of the Arctic,’ states a report from Russian scientists from four institutions in collaboration with Princetown University.

    Some 300 prehistoric worms were analysed - and two ‘were shown to contain viable nematodes’.

    ‘After being defrosted, the nematodes showed signs of life,’ said a report today from Yakutia, the area where the worms were found.

    ‘They started moving and eating.’ "


    http://siberiantimes.com/science/ca...rost-for-up-to-42000-years-come-back-to-life/
     
    Knobby22 likes this.
  8. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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  9. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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  10. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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  11. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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  12. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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    "A study of hundreds of years of family trees suggests a man's genes play a role in him having sons or daughters. Men inherit a tendency to have more sons or more daughters from their parents. This means that a man with many brothers is more likely to have sons, while a man with many sisters is more likely to have daughters."

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081211121835.htm
     
  13. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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  14. Knobby22

    Knobby22 Mmmmmm 2nd breakfast

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    My Dad had three brothers and two sisters.
    I have two brothers and two sisters.
    I have one son and one daughter.
     
  15. Tisme

    Tisme Apathetic at Best

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    Might pay to get yourself RFID wallet or pouch to store your spare and useful car key.

     
    basilio likes this.
  16. basilio

    basilio

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    Understanding how ice keeps water cool.

    kS Analogy 15 - Ice Tea and Temperature Rise
    Posted on 16 October 2018 by Evan, jg
    Tag Line

    Even on a hot day, as long as your glass of tea has ice it is a nice, cool drink. Only when the ice disappears does your drink start to warm up.

    Elevator Statement
    The height of a balloon above the ground is not proportional to the amount of hot air you put into the envelope.1 In fact, when you first start filling a balloon all that happens is that the hot air causes the envelope to lift off of the ground, applying tension to the basket and its occupants, but there is no upward motion of the balloon at that point. You pump in more and more hot air, and if select US Senators were standing by they would likely proclaim that there is absolutely no effect of hot air on the balloon.

    The problem, of course, is that a huge amount of hot air must be injected into the balloon just to overcome the weight of the envelope, the basket, and its occupants. As long as the upward force is less than the downward, restraining force, nothing happens. But once the upward force overcomes the downward force, up you go, and any small addition of hot air2 at this point causes you to accelerate faster and faster skyward.

    Ever wonder why you put ice cubes into your water and not cold rocks? The difference between ice and rocks is that the temperature of a cold rock will slowly increase along with the liquid it is trying to keep cold, and will do no better keeping the liquid cool than the cool liquid itself. Cold rocks do nothing to keep your drink cool.

    However, ice is effective because as long as there is ice in your glass, the combination of ice and tea will stay near 0°C. As soon as the ice melts and is completely gone the temperature of your tea starts to rise, and soon your drink becomes warm and tasteless. We have all used ice in our drinks, but likely without ever realizing that the reason for using ice is that by definition, the temperature of ice cannot rise above 0°C, whereas a cold rock will easily warm up past 0°C. So if there is ice in your glass, it stabilizes the temperature to near 0°C. Read on in the next section to learn about the property of ice that keeps your ice tea near 0°C.

    In the last 40 years we’ve lost about 50% of the Arctic ice area and about 70% of the volume.3 Time to ask Earth’s bartender for more ice for our drink, lest the temperature of the Arctic becomes too warm.
    https://www.skepticalscience.com/SkS_Analogy_15_Ice_Tea_Temperature_Rise.html
     
  17. basilio

    basilio

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    A Climate Catastrophe Paved the Way for the Dinosaurs’ Reign
    “The need to understand strange events like the Carnian Pluvial Episode has taken on new urgency."

    In Italy, the dawn of the greatest empire in the history of the world is marked, not by broken marble pediments strewn across the seven hills of Rome, but modest three-toed footprints pressed into rocks far to the north, high in the Italian Alps. They were left by coastal dinosaurs patrolling the tidal flats of a tropical lagoon over 230 million years ago, and they’re among the earliest in Earth’s history. Perhaps more remarkable, though, than this sudden appearance of dinosaurs in ancient Europe, are the strange rocks which host them. The legendary reptile trackways appear just above crumbling bands of red clay that cut through the cream-colored peaks of the Dolomites—a striking dash in the strata that marks one of the most bizarre climate events ever.

    Almost a quarter-billion years ago, rains soaked the arid wastes of the supercontinent Pangaea for more than a million years. When the floodwaters retreated, a new world was born.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/10/dinosaurs-dolomites/573286/
     
  18. basilio

    basilio

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    Did a GIANT ASTEROID destroy the dinosours ?

    In the past 35 years science came to the conclusion that a giant asteroid hit Mexico 66 Million years ago and threw up a cloud of dust as well as catastrophic impact effects that caused the near immediate extinction of most of life on earth.

    But what if this theory is wrong ?
    This is a fascinating story.

    The Nastiest Feud in Science
    A Princeton geologist has endured decades of ridicule for arguing that the fifth extinction was caused not by an asteroid but by a series of colossal volcanic eruptions. But she’s reopened that debate.

    Gerta Keller was waiting for me at the Mumbai airport so we could catch a flight to Hyderabad and go hunt rocks. “You won’t die,” she told me cheerfully as soon as I’d said hello. “I’ll bring you back.”

    Death was not something I’d considered as a possible consequence of traveling with Keller, a 73-year-old paleontology and geology professor at Princeton University. She looked harmless enough: thin, with a blunt bob, wearing gray nylon pants and hiking boots, and carrying an insulated ShopRite supermarket bag by way of a purse.

    I quickly learned that Keller felt such reassurances were necessary because, appropriately for someone who studies mass extinctions, she has a tendency to attract disaster. Long before our 90-minute flight touched down, she’d told me about having narrowly escaped death four times—once while attempting suicide, once from hepatitis contracted during an Algerian coup, once from getting shot in a robbery gone wrong, and once from food poisoning in India—and this was by no means an exhaustive list. She has crisscrossed dozens of countries doing field research and can claim near-death experiences in many of them: with a jaguar in Belize, a boa in Madagascar, a mob in Haiti, an uprising in Mexico.*

    Keller had vowed not to return to India after the food-poisoning debacle. But, never one to avoid calamity, she’d traveled to Mumbai—and gotten sick before her plane had even landed; an in-flight meal had left her retching. Keller was in India to research a catastrophe that has consumed her for the past 30 years: the annihilation of three-quarters of the Earth’s species—including, famously, the dinosaurs—during our planet’s most recent mass extinction, about 66 million years ago. She would be joined in Hyderabad by three collaborators: the geologists Thierry Adatte, from the University of Lausanne; Syed Khadri, from Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, in central India; and Mike Eddy, also from Princeton. They picked us up at the airport in a seat-belt-less van manned by a driver who looked barely out of his teens, and we began the five-hour drive to our hotel in a town so remote, I hadn’t confidently located it on a map.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/09/dinosaur-extinction-debate/565769/
     
  19. Darc Knight

    Darc Knight Investor not Trader

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    Cliffs pls Bas :p
     
  20. basilio

    basilio

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