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Generational Shift

moXJO

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So millennials (according to the census) are the larger voting block and have overtaken boomers.

You may have noticed the shift in direction that policy and the world has taken in the last few years. Values, work, welfare, tax breaks will all shift as politicians kiss ar5e.

Be interesting to see the investment landscape.
 

Value Collector

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So millennials (according to the census) are the larger voting block and have overtaken boomers.

You may have noticed the shift in direction that policy and the world has taken in the last few years. Values, work, welfare, tax breaks will all shift as politicians kiss ar5e.

Be interesting to see the investment landscape.
As a Millennial myself, I think it's going to be a good thing, every generation tends to continue improving society for the better, and the Millennials will be no different. The shift in policy etc you are talking about is not really any different in scale from the shift that the boomers caused. I Mean rewind to the 60's and you can bet that there was many stodgy 50 and 60 year olds complaining about the "kids these days" and that the social movements at the time were going to destroy society. But if you actually take a look through history you will see the various social movements have improved society, even though though the stodgy old folks resisted the changes at the time, the "good ol days" weren't as good as people remember, thats just nostalgia talking, the current times aren't as bad as they claim, thats just fear of change.
 
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So millennials (according to the census) are the larger voting block and have overtaken boomers.

You may have noticed the shift in direction that policy and the world has taken in the last few years. Values, work, welfare, tax breaks will all shift as politicians kiss ar5e.

Be interesting to see the investment landscape.

That’s a strange way to put it “kiss ae5e”, after all, the politician usually follows what the greater number of their constituents want.

A politician has only a few basic requirements, find out what the people want and find out what the country/local area needs, and then model a compromise and sell it to the voter.

If the boomer generation is now out-numbered by a younger generation the politicians must still negotiate an agreement with their constituents, and accept the requirements of the larger voting block or lose their seat at an election.
 

moXJO

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That’s a strange way to put it “kiss ae5e”, after all, the politician usually follows what the greater number of their constituents want.

A politician has only a few basic requirements, find out what the people want and find out what the country/local area needs, and then model a compromise and sell it to the voter.

If the boomer generation is now out-numbered by a younger generation the politicians must still negotiate an agreement with their constituents, and accept the requirements of the larger voting block or lose their seat at an election.

"Kiss arse" is apt.
Scomo blatantly tried to tap those numbers- unsuccessfully.

The point being that direction has been changing and will continue at a faster pace.
 

greggles

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I would argue that going down a road of political and economic populism is a grave mistake. Look at how much money printing and debt that course leads to. We have the entirety of the ScoMo years to use as an example.

I would also argue that not all change is change for the better. What is lacking in politics right now is principle and taking hard decisions for longer term beneficial outcomes. This thinking one election cycle at a time will be the end of us.

The West is weakening morally. Look at our piddling response to Russian aggression in Ukraine. China and Russia are both harder, tougher, and more ambitious than we are and they are both playing the long game while our governments are printing money and handing it out left, right and centre like parents handing out money to their demanding, spolied children.
 

Garpal Gumnut

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As a Millennial myself, I think it's going to be a good thing, every generation tends to continue improving society for the better, and the Millennials will be no different. The shift in policy etc you are talking about is not really any different in scale from the shift that the boomers caused. I Mean rewind to the 60's and you can bet that there was many stodgy 50 and 60 year olds complaining about the "kids these days" and that the social movements at the time were going to destroy society. But if you actually take a look through history you will see the various social movements have improved society, even though though the stodgy old folks resisted the changes at the time, the "good ol days" weren't as good as people remember, thats just nostalgia talking, the current times aren't as bad as they claim, thats just fear of change.
I'm a Boomer and find the Millennials much more responsible in their outlook than I was at their age. They resemble my parents generation more than mine.

So from an investment view, it will be more of the same, less innovation and a more responsible public and financial sphere.

My generation, the Boomers are and were a pack of thankless, untrustworthy, risk-taking, irresponsible rogues and rule breakers. As we age in to senescence conning the system to provide better pharma, accomodation and money for nothing will be our primary aim. ( the chicks for free will be an optional depending on stage of prostate cancer for the blokes, and the boomer chicks will have enough money to enjoy a toyboy or three. )

The Millennials will pass sensible legislation as our parents did to deprive freeloaders such as Boomers from what is their desserts.

I would guess more infrastructure, housing, military, pharma and a continuation of big mining and oil, segueing in to Sustainable Energy and Transport as better fuels and energy come aboard.

gg
 
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My generation, the Boomers are and were a pack of thankless, untrustworthy, risk-taking, irresponsible rogues and rule breakers.
yep , and i started early and hard , and stood out from the pack ( because i ran solo most of the time , and still was more audacious )

not so sure what you mean about free-loaders though , i had income from about 6 ( that my parents never knew about ) by the time i was 12 had two small businesses ( my parents never knew about ) one paper round and another job ( the parents never knew about , they had to give permission for the paper round )
 

Value Collector

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That’s a strange way to put it “kiss ae5e”, after all, the politician usually follows what the greater number of their constituents want.

A politician has only a few basic requirements, find out what the people want and find out what the country/local area needs, and then model a compromise and sell it to the voter.

If the boomer generation is now out-numbered by a younger generation the politicians must still negotiate an agreement with their constituents, and accept the requirements of the larger voting block or lose their seat at an election.
Also, just because you are out numbered doesn't mean the general population doesn't care about the same things you do, for example a bunch of Millenials will still care about pensions, public health care etc that the boomers care about.

If the boomer generation is worried about suddenly losing power and being taken advantage of, what does that say about how they used their power? are they saying they abused their power to their advantage and are now worried Gen X, Y and Z are going to do the same to them ;-)
 

over9k

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Politicians do what their donors want and until the boomers die off and a new generation of donors replace them, the boomers will be it.
 

Value Collector

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I'm a Boomer and find the Millennials much more responsible in their outlook than I was at their age. They resemble my parents generation more than mine.
I do think its easy for some Boomers to look negatively on the generations below, but the Millennials have contributed a lot despite having had their own fair share of hardships.

The oldest Millennials left High school or college right as the Tech Wreck recession happened in 2000.

It was the adult Millennials that were aged 18-23 years old a year later the twin towers fell who made up the bulk of the young soldiers on the various battle fields.

The GFC hit 6 years later with the adult Millennials now 18-29 who again were hit hardest, struggling to find good high paying jobs, except for the military where they were still fighting two wars.

So they got some decent headwinds out of the gate, and despite that or perhaps because of it have developed on average some pretty decent core principles I feel, and are doing ok now that we are between 26 and 42 years old, its now Millennials that make up the bulk of soldiers, police, fire fighters, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, miners etc etc etc, so the can't be that bad.
 
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I just thought I'd post this list of the Generations, so's we are all on the same page. I get mixed up between them from time to time.



gg

I have to question the intellect of the Einsteins that work these labels out.

It would seem logical to me that if we are going to compare numbers per "label" then surely we need to have the same number of years in each group.

Some are 18 years, some are 14 some are 10 but still they compare one against the other.

Must be academics, doesn't matter if they are right or wrong does it :banghead:
 
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If there's one thing we've learned from history it's that humans don't learn from history.

Look at the state of the world right now. From the breakdown of globalised supply chains to the threat of widespread war in Europe to energy supply to debt to inflation, it's all been done before and most of it within living memory.

Even with more mundane things that's true. Every generation has its drug of choice to which a substantial portion end up abusing or becoming addicted. Go back to the 1950's and 60's and a large portion of men smoked. In the 1980's and 90's a large portion of young women smoked. Today one of the biggest problems in high schools is vaping. Minor detail aside, it's the same old story and much the same with harder drugs too.

Pop culture much the same. There's always a standout male singer, a standout female singer, a boy band and a girl band. Every era either someone emerges to fill that space or, if nobody emerges, the record companies manufacture one. Likewise TV talent shows are almost as old as TV broadcasting itself. And so on.

Same with the nasty stuff. There's always someone seeking to spread hate against some group that's accused of being the cause of all the world's ills and there's always plenty of people willing to suck up the narrative, unaware it's all been done before and ends in misery.

Every generation is really just a product of its circumstances which are themselves cyclical. :2twocents
 
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I've seen the newest generation , born after 2013 or extended to start 2015, described as Gen C, or nonC, as they'll have no memory of the Covid pandemic.
Agree with the concept, the pandemic will be one of those things that those born afterward will never really comprehend, but not so sure about the birth years.

I can definitely recall things which happened at a younger age than that. :2twocents
 

Dona Ferentes

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Agree with the concept, the pandemic will be one of those things that those born afterward will never really comprehend, but not so sure about the birth years.

I can definitely recall things which happened at a younger age than that.
The whole 'give a generation a label ' thing should be based on seminal events, and I think the societal pivot with Coronavirus is a clear one. Maybe it's 2017 but they seem to like 5's or 10's so I guess 2015 will do (despite the prodigious memories of some contributors).
 
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Agree with the concept, the pandemic will be one of those things that those born afterward will never really comprehend, but not so sure about the birth years.

I can definitely recall things which happened at a younger age than that. :2twocents
What makes you think they won't have their own pandemic?
 
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What makes you think they won't have their own pandemic?
You mean a real one?
We have had a pandemic pretext.i somewhat believe a illness as contagious as covid but killing above 10% lets say a 3rd of affected..and not the already dying ones ...would be a very different story and would leave a very different mark on society.
 
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