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Battery technologies for a fast charging and changing world

Is an aluminium-sulphur battery the way out of the lithium quagmire?


Researchers based out of MIT in the US say they’ve invented a new kind of battery, made from abundant and low-cost materials, that could compete with lithium-ion batteries and help plug the gaps caused by renewable intermittency.

The new battery uses the elements aluminium and sulphur as its two electrodes, with an electrolyte made of molten salt in between, and is described in a new paper by an international team of researchers in the journal
Nature.
 

Is an aluminium-sulphur battery the way out of the lithium quagmire?


Researchers based out of MIT in the US say they’ve invented a new kind of battery, made from abundant and low-cost materials, that could compete with lithium-ion batteries and help plug the gaps caused by renewable intermittency.

The new battery uses the elements aluminium and sulphur as its two electrodes, with an electrolyte made of molten salt in between, and is described in a new paper by an international team of researchers in the journal Nature.
Good evening Country Lad
On the back of your post, which rcw1 found most interesting, came across this article on aluminium-sulpur battery. By Sinead Barry • Updated: 01/09/2022 - 10:50. Not sure when originally published.


Have a very nice evening.

Kind regards
rcw1
 
Vanadium redox flow batteries.

Invented 20 years ago at the UNSW but ignored until now.

Provides long term, large scale storage for big applications like grids.

From the biased ABC..

"From" the biased ABC or "Placed" in the biased ABC? I have noticed a bit of vanadium news lately...

Maybe hotcopper and twitter aren't doing their part to pump up share prices enough?
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in this article, where the author must clearly be paid by the word, there are some points relevant to ASX stocks that are involved in mineral extraction for EV and other battery needs.

Excerpt:

"The market research firm Adamas Intelligence published a free study: State of Charge: EVs, Batteries and Battery Metals. This is a good starting point for self-directed investors. They include estimates of the actual battery materials deployed in worldwide EV fleets. This is detailed research of the bottom-up kind that is difficult to do at home.

"You will get more from reading the study, but here are some takeaways:
  • Average battery capacity in kWh is growing year on year.
  • Materials used per car is also growing year on year.
  • Car units are growing year on year.
The bottom line is simple to relate:
Battery Materials Used per Year = (Cars per Year) X (Battery Materials per Car)
This means that battery materials usage is growing faster than the car market is growing.

The estimated, point-in-time as of 2022 H1, intensity of usage per car was:
  • Lithium Carbonate Equivalent (LCE) 18.8kg/car
  • Nickel 14.1kg/car
  • Cobalt 3.0kg/car
  • Manganese 3.8kg/car
  • Graphite 28.4kg/car
if you multiply that by EV sales, measured in millions of units, you get a lot of material. The growth rate in EV sales varies a bit but climbed rapidly in the last three years. Tesla has a stated target to grow at around 50% CAGR per year through 2030....

Full article:

 
in this article, where the author must clearly be paid by the word, there are some points relevant to ASX stocks that are involved in mineral extraction for EV and other battery needs.

Excerpt:

"The market research firm Adamas Intelligence published a free study: State of Charge: EVs, Batteries and Battery Metals. This is a good starting point for self-directed investors. They include estimates of the actual battery materials deployed in worldwide EV fleets. This is detailed research of the bottom-up kind that is difficult to do at home.

"You will get more from reading the study, but here are some takeaways:
  • Average battery capacity in kWh is growing year on year.
  • Materials used per car is also growing year on year.
  • Car units are growing year on year.
The bottom line is simple to relate:

This means that battery materials usage is growing faster than the car market is growing.

The estimated, point-in-time as of 2022 H1, intensity of usage per car was:
  • Lithium Carbonate Equivalent (LCE) 18.8kg/car
  • Nickel 14.1kg/car
  • Cobalt 3.0kg/car
  • Manganese 3.8kg/car
  • Graphite 28.4kg/car
if you multiply that by EV sales, measured in millions of units, you get a lot of material. The growth rate in EV sales varies a bit but climbed rapidly in the last three years. Tesla has a stated target to grow at around 50% CAGR per year through 2030....

Full article:


Its a bit of a ramble but did talk about graphite I know the people behind the startup IG6 which has a way to go before production but the take away is currently there isn't enough graphite to meet the future demand note the graphite has to be processed before use in lithium batteries.
 
Batteries from bugs, using air for powering devices.

Nature as evidenced so often, already holds a lot of the keys to homo sapien problems.

So looking to the perhaps not so distant future.
The cynic in me asks, will we be exporting these bugs to other worlds?
Moreover, do similar bugs already exist off world?

Very, very interesting stuff this and sure wish the boffins well in patenting the technology.
 
Nature as evidenced so often, already holds a lot of the keys to homo sapien problems.

So looking to the perhaps not so distant future.
The cynic in me asks, will we be exporting these bugs to other worlds?
Moreover, do similar bugs already exist off world?

Very, very interesting stuff this and sure wish the boffins well in patenting the technology.
Even more interesting if it was scalable to grid level.
 
Sandy Munro interviews two execs from Zeta batteries about their latest technology in solid state battery development.
As usual, the issues will be scaling up the jelly roll cylinders, but they make some most interesting points about flamability, expansion, dendrites, and use of carbon nanotubes.
Its got the lot.

Mick
 
Came across this Press Release on major improvements to Li On air batteries. The fact that the battery has already been tested over 1000 cycles with minimal degradation is very promising. The headline suggests a 1000 mile range. More practically they would probablly just use 25-30% of the current batteries for the same range. Also it has been developed in the leading Research institute in the US. This is not vaporware.

New design for lithium-air battery could offer much longer driving range compared with the lithium-ion battery​


The team’s new solid electrolyte is composed of a ceramic polymer material made from relatively inexpensive elements in nanoparticle form. This new solid enables chemical reactions that produce lithium oxide (Li2O) on discharge.

“The chemical reaction for lithium superoxide or peroxide only involves one or two electrons stored per oxygen molecule, whereas that for lithium oxide involves four electrons,” said Argonne chemist Rachid Amine. More electrons stored means higher energy density.

The team’s lithium-air design is the first lithium-air battery that has achieved a four-electron reaction at room temperature. It also operates with oxygen supplied by air from the surrounding environment. The capability to run with air avoids the need for oxygen tanks to operate, a problem with earlier designs.

The team employed many different techniques to establish that a four-electron reaction was actually taking place. One key technique was transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the discharge products on the cathode surface, which was carried out at Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials, a DOE Office of Science user facility. The TEM images provided valuable insight into the four-electron discharge mechanism.

Past lithium-air test cells suffered from very short cycle lives. The team established that this shortcoming is not the case for their new battery design by building and operating a test cell for 1000 cycles, demonstrating its stability over repeated charge and discharge.

“With further development, we expect our new design for the lithium-air battery to also reach a record energy density of 1200 watt-hours per kilogram,” said Curtiss. “That is nearly four times better than lithium-ion batteries.”

 
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