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bigdog

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ASX futures pointing lower.

The ASX 200’s winning streak looks set to be tested on Monday despite a positive finish to the week on Wall Street. According to the latest SPI futures, the benchmark index is expected to fall 5 points at the open on Monday. On Friday night the Dow Jones rose 0.6%, the S&P 500 climbed 0.9%, and the Nasdaq index stormed 1.4% higher. The latter could be good news for tech shares such as Afterpay Ltd (ASX: APT) and Xero Limited (ASX: XRO).
 

bigdog

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The S&P 500 rose 1.6%, following up on strengthening in stock markets around the world. Big Tech stocks, including Apple and Microsoft, powered much of the gains. Their businesses have proven to be practically impervious to the pandemic, unlike companies that would benefit from a strengthening economy.

The market's latest upward push came as Wall Street appeared to largely shrug off the latest signs that Democrats and Republicans are no closer to reaching a deal on more aid for the economy, which remains hobbled by the pandemic. Over the weekend, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi criticized the latest offer from the Trump administration on a stimulus package as “one step forward, two steps back,” while the president's fellow Republicans called it too expensive.

Investors may be betting that Congress will deliver a more generous aid bill after the election, should Democrats regain the majority in Congress, as some polls suggest.

“The market is expressing some comfort with Democrats taking the White House and the Senate, if it means that there will be more stimulus,” said Willie Delwiche, investment strategist at Baird. “But the reality is it’s several months away before anything could get passed. It does raise a question in my mind whether or not some of this is too much, too soon in terms of the market anticipating stimulus at this point.”

The S&P 500 rose 57.09 points to 3,534.22. The benchmark index is on a four-day winning streak and is now within 1.4% of its all-time high set Sept. 2. The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 250.62 points, or 0.9%, to 28,837.52. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, gained 296.32 points, or 2.6%, to 11,876.26.

Apple climbed 6.4% and alone accounted for a quarter of the S&P 500’s rise. The iPhone maker also was the index's biggest gainer. Amazon rose 4.8%. Both companies have events coming up this week, with Apple expected to unveil its latest batch of iPhones on Tuesday and Amazon holding its Prime Day on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Microsoft also closed higher, rising 2.6%, Facebook added 4.3% and Google’s parent company gained 3.6%.

The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks, which tends to move more with expectations for the economy’s strength than Big Tech companies, notched more modest gains than the rest of the market. The index picked up 11.51 points, or 0.7%, to 1,649.05.

Mondays gains add to last week’s 3.8% rally for the S&P 500, which came amid a dizzying 360-degree spin on expectations for Congress and the White House to be able to deliver more aid for the economy.

President Donald Trump said early in the week he’d put a halt to negotiations on stimulus, even though economists and the chair of the Federal Reserve say the economic recovery likely needs it. He then backed a set of more limited programs before admonishing negotiators at the end of the week to “Go Big!” His administration unveiled its latest, increased proposal to House Democrats, valued at about $1.8 trillion, but it was rejected by Democrats over the weekend.

Investors have been agitating for more stimulus since the expiration of extra unemployment benefits for laid-off workers and other support for the economy approved by Congress earlier this year. Even if Washington can’t deliver the aid soon, some investors have been building up their expectations that it may arrive in 2021.

ASX 200 expected to storm higher.

It looks set to be another very positive day of trade for the Australian share market on Tuesday. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is poised to open the day 44 points or 0.7% higher this morning. This follows a strong start to the week on Wall Street, which in late trade sees the Dow Jones up 0.9%, the S&P 500 1.6% higher, and the Nasdaq index a sizeable 2.5% higher.


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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...ostly-higher-after-us-rally-aid-package-hopes

Strong Gains for Technology Stocks Send Wall Street Higher

Solid gains for technology stocks pushed Wall Street higher Monday, tacking more gains onto last week’s rally.

By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 12, 2020, at 4:35 p.m.

The S&P 500 rose 1.6%, following up on strengthening in stock markets around the world. Big Tech stocks, including Apple and Microsoft, powered much of the gains. Their businesses have proven to be practically impervious to the pandemic, unlike companies that would benefit from a strengthening economy.

The market's latest upward push came as Wall Street appeared to largely shrug off the latest signs that Democrats and Republicans are no closer to reaching a deal on more aid for the economy, which remains hobbled by the pandemic. Over the weekend, Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi criticized the latest offer from the Trump administration on a stimulus package as “one step forward, two steps back,” while the president's fellow Republicans called it too expensive.

Investors may be betting that Congress will deliver a more generous aid bill after the election, should Democrats regain the majority in Congress, as some polls suggest.

“The market is expressing some comfort with Democrats taking the White House and the Senate, if it means that there will be more stimulus,” said Willie Delwiche, investment strategist at Baird. “But the reality is it’s several months away before anything could get passed. It does raise a question in my mind whether or not some of this is too much, too soon in terms of the market anticipating stimulus at this point.”

The S&P 500 rose 57.09 points to 3,534.22. The benchmark index is on a four-day winning streak and is now within 1.4% of its all-time high set Sept. 2. The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 250.62 points, or 0.9%, to 28,837.52. The Nasdaq composite, which is heavily weighted with technology stocks, gained 296.32 points, or 2.6%, to 11,876.26.

Apple climbed 6.4% and alone accounted for a quarter of the S&P 500’s rise. The iPhone maker also was the index's biggest gainer. Amazon rose 4.8%. Both companies have events coming up this week, with Apple expected to unveil its latest batch of iPhones on Tuesday and Amazon holding its Prime Day on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Microsoft also closed higher, rising 2.6%, Facebook added 4.3% and Google’s parent company gained 3.6%.

The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks, which tends to move more with expectations for the economy’s strength than Big Tech companies, notched more modest gains than the rest of the market. The index picked up 11.51 points, or 0.7%, to 1,649.05.

Mondays gains add to last week’s 3.8% rally for the S&P 500, which came amid a dizzying 360-degree spin on expectations for Congress and the White House to be able to deliver more aid for the economy.

President Donald Trump said early in the week he’d put a halt to negotiations on stimulus, even though economists and the chair of the Federal Reserve say the economic recovery likely needs it. He then backed a set of more limited programs before admonishing negotiators at the end of the week to “Go Big!” His administration unveiled its latest, increased proposal to House Democrats, valued at about $1.8 trillion, but it was rejected by Democrats over the weekend.

Investors have been agitating for more stimulus since the expiration of extra unemployment benefits for laid-off workers and other support for the economy approved by Congress earlier this year. Even if Washington can’t deliver the aid soon, some investors have been building up their expectations that it may arrive in 2021.

Rising poll numbers for Democrats are raising the odds for a sweep of the White House, Senate and House of Representatives. If that were to happen, investors say it would also increase the likelihood for a big stimulus package after the election. That could offset the drag on corporate profits that investors expect a Democratic-controlled Washington would create through higher taxes and tighter regulations.

This week also marks the start of earnings reporting season for big U.S. companies, where CEOs will tell investors how they fared from July through September. Analysts are forecasting another quarter of weaker profits, with S&P 500 earnings expected to be down 20.5% from a year earlier, according to FactSet.

But that’s not as bad as analysts were forecasting a few months ago, and it’s not as bad as the 31.6% drop that S&P 500 companies reported for the spring quarter. As widespread lockdowns eased across the country, companies have been able to feel a bit of increasing momentum.

This week will feature earnings reports from many of the nation’s biggest banks, and how they fare “could give a clearer picture into just how far we’ve come in terms of economic recovery,” said Chris Larkin, managing director at E-Trade Financial.

In European markets, indexes rose in France and Germany but slipped in Britain. Asian markets closed broadly higher, except in Japan, where they fell slightly.

U.S. bond trading was closed for a holiday.
 

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bigdog

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Banks and technology companies led a broad slide for stocks on Wall Street Tuesday, snapping the market's four-day winning streak.

The S&P 500 lost 0.6%, giving back some of its gains from a day earlier. The pullback came as many forces are pushing and pulling on markets simultaneously. Coronavirus counts are rising at a worrying rate in many countries around the world, a trend that's increasing the urgency behind efforts to develop treatments.

On Tuesday, independent monitors paused enrollment in a study testing the COVID-19 antiviral drug remdesivir plus an experimental antibody therapy being developed by Eli Lilly. The company said the study was paused “out of an abundance of caution.” The news followed a disclosure late Monday by Johnson & Johnson, which said it had to temporarily pause a late-stage study of a potential COVID-19 vaccine “due to an unexplained illness in a study participant.”

Meanwhile, uncertainty about the prospects for more stimulus for the economy from Washington continues to hang over markets.

“Absent of getting any kind of fiscal stimulus, we've already seeing a leveling off in economic growth and some weakening under the surface, ” Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab. “There's concern that without that additional fiscal stimulus the economy could run into a little bit of trouble here.”

The S&P 500 fell 22.29 points to 3,511.93. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 157.71 points, or 0.6%, to 28,679.81. The Nasdaq composite gave up an early gain, slipping 12.36 points, or 0.1%, to 11,863.90.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month. Already the major stock indexes have recouped their losses from September's market swoon.

Tuesday's market slide came as the third-quarter earnings reporting season got underway. Investors will be looking for some measure of clarity over the next several weeks as CEOs line up to report how their companies fared during the summer. Wall Street is expecting another sharp drop in profits for the third quarter, nearly 21% for S&P 500 earnings per share from a year earlier. But if that proves correct, it would not be as bad as the nearly 32% plunge for the spring, according to FactSet.

Several companies kicked the season off on Tuesday with better-than-expected reports. JPMorgan Chase, Johnson & Johnson, Citigroup and BlackRock all reported stronger results for the summer than analysts had forecast.

Their stocks, though, closed mixed. BlackRock rose 3.9%, while JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup gave up initial gains and fell 1.6% and 4.8%, respectively. Johnson & Johnson dropped 2.3% and Eli Lilly fell 2.9%.

ASX 200 expected to drop lower.

The ASX 200 looks set to finally end its winning streak on Wednesday. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is poised to open the day 55 points or 0.9% lower this morning. This follows a mixed night on Wall Street. In late trade the Dow Jones is down 0.5%, the S&P 500 is 0.6% lower, and the Nasdaq is edging slightly higher


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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...mixed-as-china-reports-faster-growth-in-trade

Stocks End Lower as Wall Street Pauses After a 4-Day Rally

Stocks ended lower as Wall Street took a pause after a four-day winning streak.

By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 13, 2020, at 5:10 p.m.

By STAN CHOE and ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writers

Banks and technology companies led a broad slide for stocks on Wall Street Tuesday, snapping the market's four-day winning streak.

The S&P 500 lost 0.6%, giving back some of its gains from a day earlier. The pullback came as many forces are pushing and pulling on markets simultaneously. Coronavirus counts are rising at a worrying rate in many countries around the world, a trend that's increasing the urgency behind efforts to develop treatments.

On Tuesday, independent monitors paused enrollment in a study testing the COVID-19 antiviral drug remdesivir plus an experimental antibody therapy being developed by Eli Lilly. The company said the study was paused “out of an abundance of caution.” The news followed a disclosure late Monday by Johnson & Johnson, which said it had to temporarily pause a late-stage study of a potential COVID-19 vaccine “due to an unexplained illness in a study participant.”

Meanwhile, uncertainty about the prospects for more stimulus for the economy from Washington continues to hang over markets.

“Absent of getting any kind of fiscal stimulus, we've already seeing a leveling off in economic growth and some weakening under the surface, ” Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab. “There's concern that without that additional fiscal stimulus the economy could run into a little bit of trouble here.”

The S&P 500 fell 22.29 points to 3,511.93. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 157.71 points, or 0.6%, to 28,679.81. The Nasdaq composite gave up an early gain, slipping 12.36 points, or 0.1%, to 11,863.90.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month. Already the major stock indexes have recouped their losses from September's market swoon.

Tuesday's market slide came as the third-quarter earnings reporting season got underway. Investors will be looking for some measure of clarity over the next several weeks as CEOs line up to report how their companies fared during the summer. Wall Street is expecting another sharp drop in profits for the third quarter, nearly 21% for S&P 500 earnings per share from a year earlier. But if that proves correct, it would not be as bad as the nearly 32% plunge for the spring, according to FactSet.

Several companies kicked the season off on Tuesday with better-than-expected reports. JPMorgan Chase, Johnson & Johnson, Citigroup and BlackRock all reported stronger results for the summer than analysts had forecast.

Their stocks, though, closed mixed. BlackRock rose 3.9%, while JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup gave up initial gains and fell 1.6% and 4.8%, respectively. Johnson & Johnson dropped 2.3% and Eli Lilly fell 2.9%.

Delta Air Lines reported a worse loss than Wall Street had forecast, as the pandemic keeps many fliers grounded, and its shares slid 2.7%.

Other airlines and travel-related companies were also weak, and Royal Caribbean dropped 13.2% for the biggest loss in the S&P 500. The cruise operator said it will sell up to $575 million of stock to raise cash.

On the winning side was The Walt Disney Co., which climbed 3.2% for one of the bigger gains in the S&P 500 after it announced a major reorganization of its company to focus on Disney Plus and its other streaming services.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 0.72% from 0.79% late Friday. Treasury markets were closed Monday for a holiday.

A government report showed that prices for consumers were 0.2% higher in September than August. That matched economists’ expectations, and it also showed that month-over-month inflation has slowed since strengthening in the summer.

Lower inflation gives the Federal Reserve more leeway to keep interest rates low, though it has said it may keep its benchmark rate at nearly zero even if inflation tops its 2% target.

While the Federal Reserve keeps the accelerator floored on its support for the economy and markets, a deep partisan divide has Congress and the White House struggling to deliver more aid of their own. Extra unemployment benefits for laid-off workers and other stimulus that Congress approved earlier this year has already expired.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he’s scheduling a vote on a scaled-back GOP coronavirus relief bill for Oct. 19. Democrats filibustered a GOP-drafted aid bill last month and recent talks on a larger deal with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., fell apart this past weekend. In a letter to colleagues Tuesday, Pelosi called the White House’s latest proposal insufficient and said significant changes are needed.

President Donald Trump has said that Capitol Hill Republicans should “go big” rather than the limited approach they’ve been advocating. If stimulus can’t arrive before the election, some investors have gotten more optimistic about the chances of a big support package next year if Democrats sweep the upcoming election.

“There’s a greater likelihood for a stimulus package, and an even bigger one, should we get a Blue Wave," said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at CFRA. “And investors are probably responding to the poll numbers that are implying that we won't have a contested election.”

Smaller stocks, which tend to move more with investors' expectations for the economy than the biggest stocks, were weakening more than the rest of the market. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks fell 12.21 points, or 0.7%, to 1,636.85.

European markets ended lower, while Asian markets were mixed.
 

bigdog

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Stocks gave up early gains and closed lower Wednesday, adding to Wall Street's losses from a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.7% after spending the morning swaying between small gains and losses. Companies that rely on consumer spending, banks and technology and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Trading in stock markets overseas was subdued as coronavirus counts climb around the world, raising the risk of more government restrictions on businesses. Treasury yields fell, while prices for crude oil and gold rose.

The decline came as talks between Democrats and Republicans in Washington over another economic stimulus package continued to drag on, dimming investors' hopes for a deal that can deliver more aid for the U.S. economy in the near term.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi spoke by phone again Wednesday morning but didn’t reach an agreement, Pelosi aide Drew Hammill tweeted, adding that the two plan to speak again Thursday. Mnuchin said at a conference sponsored by the Milken Institute that it would be “difficult” to get a deal done before the presidential election next month.

“The time for being able to pull this off is now coming to a close,” said Rod von Lipsey, managing director at UBS Private Wealth Management. “The market has been listless because it understands that it’s probably not going to happen.”

Investors are still anticipating some kind of an aid package eventually passing, he said, but it will now likely wait until after the election.

The S&P 500 fell 23.26 points to 3,488.67. The benchmark index broke a strong four-day winning streak on Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 165.81 points, or 0.6%, to 28,514. The pullback knocked the Dow back into the red for the year. The Nasdaq composite slid 95.17 points, or 0.8%, to 11,768.73. At one point it had been up 0.6%.

Small company stocks, the biggest gainers so far this month, also fell. The Russell 2000 small-caps index gave up 15.20 points, or 0.9%, to 1,621.65.

Despite the market's two-day slide, stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month. About halfway through October, the major stock indexes have recouped most of their losses from last month's market swoon.

Even so, this week’s kick-off to earnings reporting season is painting a mixed picture for investors.

Big banks are traditionally the first companies to tell investors how much profit they made in the prior quarter, and Bank of America and Wells Fargo fell following the release of their reports, posting the biggest losses in the S&P 500. Bank of America sank 5.3% after its revenue fell short of analysts’ forecast, while Wells Fargo dropped 6% after its earnings were lower than Wall Street expected.

Goldman Sachs rose 0.2% after reporting stronger profit than analysts expected. U.S. Bancorp was fell 0.4% after giving up an early gain following its earnings report, which was also stronger than analysts expected.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

ASX 200 futures pointing slightly lower.

The Australian share market is expected to edge lower on Thursday after a weak night of trade on Wall Street. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is poised to open the day 1 point lower this morning. In late trade on Wall Street the Dow Jones is down 0.3%, the S&P 500 has fallen 0.4% lower, and the Nasdaq is down 0.5%.


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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...track-wall-street-decline-on-pandemic-jitters

Stocks Fall on Wall Street as Hopes Fade for Stimulus Deal

Stocks are closing lower on Wall Street Wednesday, extending the market's losses from a day earlier, as talks drag on in Washington over another economic stimulus package.

By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 14, 2020, at 4:48 p.m.

By STAN CHOE, DAMIAN J. TROISE and ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writers

Stocks gave up early gains and closed lower Wednesday, adding to Wall Street's losses from a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.7% after spending the morning swaying between small gains and losses. Companies that rely on consumer spending, banks and technology and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Trading in stock markets overseas was subdued as coronavirus counts climb around the world, raising the risk of more government restrictions on businesses. Treasury yields fell, while prices for crude oil and gold rose.

The decline came as talks between Democrats and Republicans in Washington over another economic stimulus package continued to drag on, dimming investors' hopes for a deal that can deliver more aid for the U.S. economy in the near term.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi spoke by phone again Wednesday morning but didn’t reach an agreement, Pelosi aide Drew Hammill tweeted, adding that the two plan to speak again Thursday. Mnuchin said at a conference sponsored by the Milken Institute that it would be “difficult” to get a deal done before the presidential election next month.

“The time for being able to pull this off is now coming to a close,” said Rod von Lipsey, managing director at UBS Private Wealth Management. “The market has been listless because it understands that it’s probably not going to happen.”

Investors are still anticipating some kind of an aid package eventually passing, he said, but it will now likely wait until after the election.

The S&P 500 fell 23.26 points to 3,488.67. The benchmark index broke a strong four-day winning streak on Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 165.81 points, or 0.6%, to 28,514. The pullback knocked the Dow back into the red for the year. The Nasdaq composite slid 95.17 points, or 0.8%, to 11,768.73. At one point it had been up 0.6%.

Small company stocks, the biggest gainers so far this month, also fell. The Russell 2000 small-caps index gave up 15.20 points, or 0.9%, to 1,621.65.

Despite the market's two-day slide, stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month. About halfway through October, the major stock indexes have recouped most of their losses from last month's market swoon.

Even so, this week’s kick-off to earnings reporting season is painting a mixed picture for investors.

Big banks are traditionally the first companies to tell investors how much profit they made in the prior quarter, and Bank of America and Wells Fargo fell following the release of their reports, posting the biggest losses in the S&P 500. Bank of America sank 5.3% after its revenue fell short of analysts’ forecast, while Wells Fargo dropped 6% after its earnings were lower than Wall Street expected.

Goldman Sachs rose 0.2% after reporting stronger profit than analysts expected. U.S. Bancorp was fell 0.4% after giving up an early gain following its earnings report, which was also stronger than analysts expected.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

The sharpest profit drops for the quarter are expected to come from energy stocks, but the sector rose Wednesday to some of the biggest gains among the 11 that make up the S&P 500 index. A 2.1% rise for crude oil prices helped. So did a report that ConocoPhillips is in talks to buy Concho Resources. Concho jumped 10.2%, the biggest gainer in the S&P 500, following the report from Bloomberg News.

Tech stocks fell, weighing down the broader S&P 500. Amazon fell 2.3% and Microsoft slid 0.9%. Apple bounced back from an early slide and eked out a 0.1% gain.

Because of their massive size, the movements of Big Tech stocks have an outsized effect on the S&P 500 and other indexes.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 0.72% from 0.74% late Tuesday despite a report showing that inflation at the wholesale level strengthened more than economists expected last month.

Prices for producers rose 0.4% last month from August, double economists’ expectations. But even though inflation firmed, economists say it’s still subdued amid a weakened economy.

The Federal Reserve has also indicated that it will keep interest rates at nearly zero for a while to support the economy, even if inflation hits its target level.

Aid for the economy from elsewhere in Washington, though, has been harder to come by. Hopes are fading that Congress and the White House can agree on another round of support any time soon.

“The cold reality that markets have refused to countenance is that even if an agreement was reached, its chances of being enacted before the November election are about zero,” said Jeffrey Halley of Oanda. “Still, this is 2020, the year where markets never let reality get in the way of a good story.”

Economists and the head of the Federal Reserve have said the economy will likely need such stimulus. Earlier benefits for laid-off workers and other support that Congress approved earlier this year have expired.

The rate at which Americans save money spiked earlier this year as the pandemic-related business shutdowns limited where people could shop. Thus far, that extra savings cushion has helped people who lost their job weather the loss of extra unemployment benefits, said Elyse Ausenbaugh, global market strategist at J.P. Morgan Private Bank.

“It’s not going to last forever, especially with the unemployment rate so high,” she said. "That really underscores the need for the government to gas the economy.”

European and Aisian markets ended mixed.
 

bigdog

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U.S. stock indexes erased much of their early losses and closed modestly lower Thursday, extending the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after having been down 1.4%. Technology, health care and communications stocks accounted for most of the selling, outweighing slight gains in banks and elsewhere in the market.

Wall Street has turned cautious this week amid a confluence of worrisome trends for the economy, which is still hampered by the pandemic. Coronavirus infections are rising in Europe, prompting governments in France and Britain to impose new measures to contain the outbreak. European stock indexes fell broadly Thursday as traders pulled money out of riskier investments.

In the U.S., investor optimism that the Trump administration and Congress will soon reach a deal on another round of stimulus for the economy has waned. And the government said Thursday that the number of Americans seeking unemployment aid increased more than expected last week.

“The stimulus talk continues to be a little negative, and the virus outbreak in Europe that’s going to probably cause more shutdowns in various cities and countries, that’s a little bit of a negative, too,” said Scott Wren, senior global market strategist, Wells Fargo Investment Institute.

Still, Wren added, the market is expecting Washington will deliver another round of stimulus at some point, and continues to expect that various efforts to develop COVID-19 treatments and vaccines will pan out, eventually. If that wasn’t the case, the recent pullback in stocks would be much more severe, he said.

“The market is still pretty convinced we’re going to see good news on both fronts, it’s just not sure when,” Wren said.

The S&P 500 fell 5.33 points to 3,483.34. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 19.80 points, or 0.1%, to 28,494.20. It had been down 332 points in the early going. The Nasdaq composite gave up 54.86 points, or 0.5%, to 11,713.87.

Smaller company stocks fared better than the broader market. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks bounced back from an early slide and rose 17.23 points, or 1.1%, to 1,638.88.

Stocks have been mostly climbing this month, but have pulled back this week as ongoing talks between Democrats and Republicans on an economic stimulus package have failed to deliver results. Investors have been hoping that Washington would provide more financial support for the economy since July, when a $600-a-week extra benefit for the unemployed expired.

The government's latest weekly tally of unemployment claims underscores how the economy continues to be hobbled by the pandemic and recession that erupted seven months ago. The Labor Department said Thursday that the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 898,000, a historically high number that exceeds analysts forecasts.

The report follows recent data that have signaled a slowdown in hiring. The economy is still roughly 10.7 million jobs short of recovering all the 22 million jobs that were lost when the pandemic struck in early spring.

The 10-year Treasury yield held steady at 0.73%.

Investors continued to weigh the latest batch of earnings reports from major U.S. companies. Several reports so far have been better than expected, but the health crisis continues to cloud the outlook.

United Airlines slumped 3.8% Thursday after reporting that its revenue plummeted over the summer. Morgan Stanley rose 1.3% after the investment bank said its third-quarter profit jumped 25%, thanks to a surge in trading revenue and higher fees. Walgreens Boots Alliance gained 4.8% after the drugstore chain's latest quarterly results topped Wall Street's forecasts.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

ASX 200 futures pointing lower.

The ASX 200 is expected to edge lower on Friday after a soft night of trade on Wall Street. According to the latest SPI futures, the benchmark index is poised to open the day 2 points lower this morning. In late trade in the United States the Dow Jones is down 0.05%, the S&P 500 is 0.15% lower, and the Nasdaq is down 0.4%.


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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...s-follow-wall-st-lower-as-stimulus-hopes-fade

Stocks Fall on Wall Street as Coronavirus Spreads in Europe
Stocks are ending mostly lower on Wall Street, giving the S&P 500 its third straight loss this week.
By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 15, 2020, at 4:48 p.m.

By ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writer

U.S. stock indexes erased much of their early losses and closed modestly lower Thursday, extending the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after having been down 1.4%. Technology, health care and communications stocks accounted for most of the selling, outweighing slight gains in banks and elsewhere in the market.

Wall Street has turned cautious this week amid a confluence of worrisome trends for the economy, which is still hampered by the pandemic. Coronavirus infections are rising in Europe, prompting governments in France and Britain to impose new measures to contain the outbreak. European stock indexes fell broadly Thursday as traders pulled money out of riskier investments.

In the U.S., investor optimism that the Trump administration and Congress will soon reach a deal on another round of stimulus for the economy has waned. And the government said Thursday that the number of Americans seeking unemployment aid increased more than expected last week.

“The stimulus talk continues to be a little negative, and the virus outbreak in Europe that’s going to probably cause more shutdowns in various cities and countries, that’s a little bit of a negative, too,” said Scott Wren, senior global market strategist, Wells Fargo Investment Institute.

Still, Wren added, the market is expecting Washington will deliver another round of stimulus at some point, and continues to expect that various efforts to develop COVID-19 treatments and vaccines will pan out, eventually. If that wasn’t the case, the recent pullback in stocks would be much more severe, he said.

“The market is still pretty convinced we’re going to see good news on both fronts, it’s just not sure when,” Wren said.

The S&P 500 fell 5.33 points to 3,483.34. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 19.80 points, or 0.1%, to 28,494.20. It had been down 332 points in the early going. The Nasdaq composite gave up 54.86 points, or 0.5%, to 11,713.87.

Smaller company stocks fared better than the broader market. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks bounced back from an early slide and rose 17.23 points, or 1.1%, to 1,638.88.

Stocks have been mostly climbing this month, but have pulled back this week as ongoing talks between Democrats and Republicans on an economic stimulus package have failed to deliver results. Investors have been hoping that Washington would provide more financial support for the economy since July, when a $600-a-week extra benefit for the unemployed expired.

The government's latest weekly tally of unemployment claims underscores how the economy continues to be hobbled by the pandemic and recession that erupted seven months ago. The Labor Department said Thursday that the number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose last week to 898,000, a historically high number that exceeds analysts forecasts.

The report follows recent data that have signaled a slowdown in hiring. The economy is still roughly 10.7 million jobs short of recovering all the 22 million jobs that were lost when the pandemic struck in early spring.

The 10-year Treasury yield held steady at 0.73%.

Investors continued to weigh the latest batch of earnings reports from major U.S. companies. Several reports so far have been better than expected, but the health crisis continues to cloud the outlook.

United Airlines slumped 3.8% Thursday after reporting that its revenue plummeted over the summer. Morgan Stanley rose 1.3% after the investment bank said its third-quarter profit jumped 25%, thanks to a surge in trading revenue and higher fees. Walgreens Boots Alliance gained 4.8% after the drugstore chain's latest quarterly results topped Wall Street's forecasts.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

A resurgence in coronavirus infections in Europe has also given investors cause to turn cautious. Fears are rising that Europe is running out of chances to control the new outbreak, as infections hit record daily highs in Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy and Poland. France slapped a 9 p.m. curfew on many of its biggest cities and Londoners face new travel restrictions as governments take increasingly tough actions.

The limits on public life are not as strict as the full lockdowns imposed during the spring, but will stunt or even reverse the economy’s recovery from recession, experts say.

European markets fell broadly after France imposed a curfew on many of its biggest cities and Londoners faced new travel restrictions. Germany’s DAX lost 2.5%. The CAC 40 in France slid 2.1%. The FTSE 100 in London fell 1.7%.

In Asia, the Shanghai Composite Index lost 0.3% and the Nikkei 225 in Tokyo sank 0.7%. The Hang Seng in Hong Kong lost 2.1%.

The Kospi in Seoul shed 0.8% despite a strong market debut by the company that manages popular South Korean boy band BTS. The group faces criticism by Chinese internet users after its leader thanked Korean War veterans for their sacrifices.

Big Hit Entertainment Ltd.’s share price doubled by midday but ended the day close to its opening. Its market value after an initial public offering that raised more than $800 million was about $7.5 billion.
 

bigdog

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Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading with more of the same Friday, as a late-afternoon stumble led U.S. stock indexes to a mixed finish.

The S&P 500 ended the day just a fraction of a point higher after a burst of selling erased a 0.9% gain. Despite a three-day stretch of losses, the benchmark index still managed to finish higher for the week, its third straight weekly gain.

Big Tech and energy companies fell while health care and industrial stocks rose. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also eked out a gain, while the Nasdaq composite posted its fourth straight loss. Treasury yields were flat.

The market had been up for much of the day after the government reported that retail sales rose in September for the fifth straight month. That report appeared to overshadow new data showed U.S. industrial production had its weakest showing last month since the spring.

The market's late-day fade capped a week of volatility for stocks as companies began reporting their third-quarter results and traders' hopes for a new round of economic stimulus from Washington dimmed.

“The market is sort of bouncing around here,” said Tom Martin, senior portfolio manager with Globalt Investments. “We’ve had a lot of noise lately and that’s probably what we’re going to have over the next couple of weeks.”

The S&P 500 rose 0.47 points to 3,483.81. The Dow gained 112.11 points, or 0.4%, to 28,606.31. At one point, it had been up by 348 points. The Nasdaq fell 42.32 points, or 0.4%, to 11,671.56. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks dropped 5.08 points, or 0.3%, to 1,633.81.

Despite the market’s downbeat finish, the major stock indexes have already recouped most of their losses from September's market swoon.

Stocks have been mostly climbing this month, but trading became choppy this week as ongoing talks between Democrats and Republicans on an economic stimulus package failed to deliver results. Investors have been hoping that Washington would provide more financial support for the economy since July, when a $600-a-week extra benefit for the unemployed expired.

Traders have been watching economic data closely to see whether the loss of that beefed-up unemployment aid would lead to an overall pullback in spending. On Thursday, the government’s said the number of Americans seeking unemployment aid increased last week to 898,000, a historically high level that underscores how the economy continues to be hobbled by the pandemic and recession that erupted seven months ago.

Friday’s retail sales report provides some encouragement, suggesting Americans’ appetite for spending remained solid last month. The Commerce Department said retail sales rose 1.9% in September, the fifth straight monthly increase.


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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...ixed-amid-2nd-wave-coronavirus-election-fears

A Late Slide Erases Gains for US Indexes, Leaving Them Mixed
Stocks took a late stumble on Wall Street, erasing an early gain and leaving major indexes mixed on Friday.
By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 16, 2020, at 4:57 p.m.

By ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writer

Wall Street closed out a choppy week of trading with more of the same Friday, as a late-afternoon stumble led U.S. stock indexes to a mixed finish.

The S&P 500 ended the day just a fraction of a point higher after a burst of selling erased a 0.9% gain. Despite a three-day stretch of losses, the benchmark index still managed to finish higher for the week, its third straight weekly gain.

Big Tech and energy companies fell while health care and industrial stocks rose. The Dow Jones Industrial Average also eked out a gain, while the Nasdaq composite posted its fourth straight loss. Treasury yields were flat.

The market had been up for much of the day after the government reported that retail sales rose in September for the fifth straight month. That report appeared to overshadow new data showed U.S. industrial production had its weakest showing last month since the spring.

The market's late-day fade capped a week of volatility for stocks as companies began reporting their third-quarter results and traders' hopes for a new round of economic stimulus from Washington dimmed.

“The market is sort of bouncing around here,” said Tom Martin, senior portfolio manager with Globalt Investments. “We’ve had a lot of noise lately and that’s probably what we’re going to have over the next couple of weeks.”

The S&P 500 rose 0.47 points to 3,483.81. The Dow gained 112.11 points, or 0.4%, to 28,606.31. At one point, it had been up by 348 points. The Nasdaq fell 42.32 points, or 0.4%, to 11,671.56. The Russell 2000 index of small-cap stocks dropped 5.08 points, or 0.3%, to 1,633.81.

Despite the market’s downbeat finish, the major stock indexes have already recouped most of their losses from September's market swoon.

Stocks have been mostly climbing this month, but trading became choppy this week as ongoing talks between Democrats and Republicans on an economic stimulus package failed to deliver results. Investors have been hoping that Washington would provide more financial support for the economy since July, when a $600-a-week extra benefit for the unemployed expired.

Traders have been watching economic data closely to see whether the loss of that beefed-up unemployment aid would lead to an overall pullback in spending. On Thursday, the government’s said the number of Americans seeking unemployment aid increased last week to 898,000, a historically high level that underscores how the economy continues to be hobbled by the pandemic and recession that erupted seven months ago.

Friday’s retail sales report provides some encouragement, suggesting Americans’ appetite for spending remained solid last month. The Commerce Department said retail sales rose 1.9% in September, the fifth straight monthly increase.

“There’s a need for stimulus, even though this data is heartening in a way,” said Ross Mayfield, an investment strategist at Baird.

Still, given that the Nov. 3 election is fast approaching, the market is not expecting leadership in Washington to deliver an economic stimulus package before voters go to the polls, Mayfield said.

“Now, it’s essentially baked in that we probably won’t see anything until after the election,” he said.

The retail sales report initially juiced shares in retailers and other companies that rely on consumer spending, but most of those gains evaporated by the end of the day.

Other data point to persistent weakness in the economy. The Federal Reserve said Friday that U.S. industrial production fell 0.6% last month, the weakest showing since April’s 12.7% skid amid widespread business shutdowns due to the pandemic. Economists had been expecting an increase.

A surge in new coronavirus infections in Europe, the Americas and parts of Asia, is also giving traders reason to turn cautious. The new caseloads prompted governments in France and Britain to impose new restrictions aimed on containing the outbreak contributed to some of the selling in the market earlier this week.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring, reflecting some signs of improvement in the economy since then.

Analysts have been raising their earnings forecasts for how companies fared in the third quarter after lowering them sharply ahead of the second quarter. That means it will be tougher for companies reporting results the next couple of weeks to beat expectations.

“Those expectations have been rising all quarter,” Mayfield said. “There’s just going to be a higher hurdle to clear to impress investors.”

Credit card issuer Ally Financial rose 2.7% after it reported better-than-expected results. Logistics company J.B. Hunt Transportation Services sank 9.7%, the biggest decliner in the S&P 500, after its third-quarter results fell short of analysts’ expectations.

Several big companies report quarterly results next week, including Netflix, Coca-Cola, Tesla, Southwest Airlines and American Express.

The 10-year Treasury yield held steady at 0.74%.

Friday’s early gains on Wall Street followed a broad rally in European stock indexes, which clawed back some of their heavy losses from a day earlier. Asian markets ended mixed.
 

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ASX 200 expected to rise.

The Australian share market looks set to start the week in a positive fashion on Monday. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is expected to open the week 39 points or 0.6% higher. This follows a reasonably positive end to the week on Wall Street. On Friday night the Dow Jones rose 0.4%, the S&P 500 edged higher, and the Nasdaq dropped 0.35% lower. Wall Street was given a boost by stronger than expected U.S. retail sales data.

Gold price edges lower.
 

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Stocks gave up some of their recent gains Monday as Wall Street's hopes that Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the economy before Election Day faded.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.6%, its worst day in more than three weeks. The benchmark index had been up 0.5% in the early going following a report that China's economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter. The market’s slide was broad, though technology, health care and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Treasury yields were mixed.

The early gains evaporated by mid afternoon ahead of another round of talks between Democratic and Republican leadership over a long-sought economic stimulus bill. Wall Street is expecting that lawmakers will agree on new stimulus measures for the economy, but the odds of that happening before the Nov. 3 election have dimmed. Over the weekend, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said a deal would have to come within 48 hours — or by Tuesday — for a stimulus package to be enacted by Election Day.

Uncertainty over when more aid for the economy may arrive, signs new coronavirus infections are surging and the upcoming election will likely make for a volatile few weeks, analysts say.

“We’re in a period here in the the next couple of weeks where the market goes sideways through the election,” Terry Sandven, chief equity strategist at U.S. Bank Wealth Management.

The S&P 500 fell 56.89 points to 3,426.92. The Dow Jones Industrial Average of big blue chips dropped 410.89 points, or 1.4%, to 28,195.42. The Nasdaq composite extended its losing streak to a fifth day, losing 192.67 points, or 1.7%, to 11,478.88.

Small company stocks also fell. The Russell 2000 gave up 20.18 points, or 1.2%, to 1,613.63. The index has gained 7% so far this month, outpacing the 1.9% gain for the broader S&P 500.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month after giving back some of their big gains this year in a sudden September swoon. The benchmark S&P 500 has notched a gain in each of the past three weeks. Even so, trading often has been choppy from one day to the next, reflecting uncertainty over the timing of more stimulus for the economy, something investors have been hoping for since July, when a supplemental $600-a-week unemployment benefit package ran out.


ASX 200 expected to fall.

The Australian share market is set to give back some of yesterday’s gain after a poor start to the week on global markets. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is poised to fall 40 points or 0.65% at the open. In late trade on Wall Street the Dow Jones is down 1.4%, the S&P 500 has dropped 1.6%, and the Nasdaq is 1.6% lower. Concerns that a stimulus deal in the U.S. won’t be signed is weighing on markets.

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https://www.necn.com/news/national-...reet-as-hopes-for-new-virus-aid-fade/2337106/

Stocks Fall on Wall Street as Hopes for New Virus Aid Fade
Stocks had been up in the early going following a report that China’s economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter
By Ken Sweet, Damian J. Troise and Alex Veiga

Stocks gave up some of their recent gains Monday as Wall Street's hopes that Washington will come through with badly needed aid for the economy before Election Day faded.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.6%, its worst day in more than three weeks. The benchmark index had been up 0.5% in the early going following a report that China's economy grew at a 5% annual rate in the last quarter. The market’s slide was broad, though technology, health care and communication stocks bore the brunt of the selling. Treasury yields were mixed.

The early gains evaporated by mid afternoon ahead of another round of talks between Democratic and Republican leadership over a long-sought economic stimulus bill. Wall Street is expecting that lawmakers will agree on new stimulus measures for the economy, but the odds of that happening before the Nov. 3 election have dimmed. Over the weekend, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said a deal would have to come within 48 hours — or by Tuesday — for a stimulus package to be enacted by Election Day.

Uncertainty over when more aid for the economy may arrive, signs new coronavirus infections are surging and the upcoming election will likely make for a volatile few weeks, analysts say.

“We’re in a period here in the the next couple of weeks where the market goes sideways through the election,” Terry Sandven, chief equity strategist at U.S. Bank Wealth Management.

The S&P 500 fell 56.89 points to 3,426.92. The Dow Jones Industrial Average of big blue chips dropped 410.89 points, or 1.4%, to 28,195.42. The Nasdaq composite extended its losing streak to a fifth day, losing 192.67 points, or 1.7%, to 11,478.88.

Small company stocks also fell. The Russell 2000 gave up 20.18 points, or 1.2%, to 1,613.63. The index has gained 7% so far this month, outpacing the 1.9% gain for the broader S&P 500.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month after giving back some of their big gains this year in a sudden September swoon. The benchmark S&P 500 has notched a gain in each of the past three weeks. Even so, trading often has been choppy from one day to the next, reflecting uncertainty over the timing of more stimulus for the economy, something investors have been hoping for since July, when a supplemental $600-a-week unemployment benefit package ran out.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is expected to bring a his version of a stimulus bill to the floor of the Senate for a vote on Wednesday. However that bill is likely to get zero traction with the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives. So far, McConnell, Pelosi and President Donald Trump have not been on the same page.

Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin spoke Monday and are due to resume talks Tuesday, Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammill tweeted after the end of regular trading.

Investors were also looking ahead to another busy week of corporate earnings reports. Procter & Gamble, Netflix and American Express are a few of the companies that will reveal the extent of the virus pandemic’s impact during the most recent quarter.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

AMC Entertainment was among the few gainers Monday. Its shares jumped 16.4% after the movie theater chain said it plans to resume operations in theaters in New York State later this week.

Several airlines also rose after the Transport Security Administration said the number of passengers screened in a single day for flights in the U.S. topped one million on Sunday for the first time since the coronavirus cases began to spike in March. That compares with 2.6 million passengers screened by TSA on the same day last year, or roughly 60% fewer. United Airlines rose 3.9% and Southwest Airlines edged up 0.4%.

ConocoPhillips fell 3.2% after the oil giant announced it would buy Concho Resources for $9.7 billion. The deal is the largest in the oil industry since crude prices plummeted this year due to the COVID pandemic. Concho lost 2.8%.

European stocks closed broadly lower, and Asian markets ended mixed.
 

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Stocks closed broadly higher Tuesday as Wall Street welcomed a batch of solid earnings reports from U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.5%, recouping some of its loss from a day earlier. Technology, communication and financial stocks powered most of the gains, while household goods makers fell. Overseas markets closed mixed. Treasury yields held steady.

Traders bid up shares in several companies that reported quarterly results that were better than analysts expected, including Procter & Gamble, Regions Financial, Albertsons and Travelers. Others didn't fare as well. Netflix shares fell in after-hours trading after the streaming service reported third-quarter earnings and a tally of new subscribers that fell short of analysts' expectations.

Investors also had their eye on Washington in hopes that Democrats and Republicans will reach a deal to deliver more aid for the economy. Fading optimism that an agreement on a new relief package will be reached before the election next month led to a late-afternoon sell-off on Monday.

“We have had a decently strong recovery out of the gate, but there are signs that it is maybe starting to slow,” said Charlie Ripley, senior investment strategist for Allianz Investment Management. “Additional stimulus aid is something that will benefit the economy.”

Shares in Google's parent company rose following news that the Justice Department sued the internet giant Tuesday, claiming Google has abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

The market had been on track for a stronger finish, before losing some of its gains by the final hour of trading. The S&P 500 rose 16.20 points to 3,443.12. The Dow Jones Industrial Average of big blue chips gained 113.37 points, or 0.4%, to 28,308.79. It had been up 379 points.

The Nasdaq composite snapped a five-day losing streak, rising 37.61 points, or 0.3%, to 11,516.49.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month after giving back some of their big gains this year in a sudden September swoon. The benchmark S&P 500 has notched a gain in each of the past three weeks. Even so, trading often has been choppy from one day to the next, reflecting uncertainty over the timing of more stimulus for the economy, something investors have been hoping for since July, when a supplemental $600-a-week unemployment benefit package ran out.

“If we can't get stimulus within the next three or four months, that's going to be damaging to the U.S. economy," said Megan Horneman, director of portfolio strategy at Verdence Capital Advisors.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he’ll schedule a vote if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Trump administration are able to seal an agreement on a huge COVID-19 relief bill. Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin held talks for the second day in a row Tuesday.

On Sunday, Pelosi said that Tuesday would be the deadline for reaching a pre-election deal with the Trump administration on a new coronavirus relief package. But she clarified in an interview with Bloomberg News Tuesday that the aim is to spur the two sides to exchange their best proposals on a host of unresolved issues, not to close out all of their disagreements or have final legislative language at hand.

ASX 200 expected to edge higher.

It looks set to be a better day of trade for the ASX 200 on Wednesday. According to the latest SPI futures, the ASX 200 is poised to open the day 2 points higher. This follows a strong night on Wall Street which in late trade sees the Dow Jones up 0.55%, the S&P 500 0.65% higher, and the Nasdaq climbing 0.5%. This follows comments by Nancy Pelosi that she is optimistic that a stimulus deal will be reached.

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https://www.usnews.com/news/busines...asian-shares-mixed-as-us-virus-aid-hopes-fade

Stocks Close Higher as Companies Report Solid Earnings
Stocks are closing higher on Wall Street following several solid earnings reports from U.S. companies.

By Associated Press, Wire Service Content Oct. 20, 2020, at 4:48 p.m.

By ALEX VEIGA and DAMIAN J. TROISE, AP Business Writers

Stocks closed broadly higher Tuesday as Wall Street welcomed a batch of solid earnings reports from U.S. companies.

The S&P 500 gained 0.5%, recouping some of its loss from a day earlier. Technology, communication and financial stocks powered most of the gains, while household goods makers fell. Overseas markets closed mixed. Treasury yields held steady.

Traders bid up shares in several companies that reported quarterly results that were better than analysts expected, including Procter & Gamble, Regions Financial, Albertsons and Travelers. Others didn't fare as well. Netflix shares fell in after-hours trading after the streaming service reported third-quarter earnings and a tally of new subscribers that fell short of analysts' expectations.

Investors also had their eye on Washington in hopes that Democrats and Republicans will reach a deal to deliver more aid for the economy. Fading optimism that an agreement on a new relief package will be reached before the election next month led to a late-afternoon sell-off on Monday.

“We have had a decently strong recovery out of the gate, but there are signs that it is maybe starting to slow,” said Charlie Ripley, senior investment strategist for Allianz Investment Management. “Additional stimulus aid is something that will benefit the economy.”

Shares in Google's parent company rose following news that the Justice Department sued the internet giant Tuesday, claiming Google has abused its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and harm consumers.

The market had been on track for a stronger finish, before losing some of its gains by the final hour of trading. The S&P 500 rose 16.20 points to 3,443.12. The Dow Jones Industrial Average of big blue chips gained 113.37 points, or 0.4%, to 28,308.79. It had been up 379 points.

The Nasdaq composite snapped a five-day losing streak, rising 37.61 points, or 0.3%, to 11,516.49.

Stocks have been mostly pushing higher this month after giving back some of their big gains this year in a sudden September swoon. The benchmark S&P 500 has notched a gain in each of the past three weeks. Even so, trading often has been choppy from one day to the next, reflecting uncertainty over the timing of more stimulus for the economy, something investors have been hoping for since July, when a supplemental $600-a-week unemployment benefit package ran out.

“If we can't get stimulus within the next three or four months, that's going to be damaging to the U.S. economy," said Megan Horneman, director of portfolio strategy at Verdence Capital Advisors.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he’ll schedule a vote if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Trump administration are able to seal an agreement on a huge COVID-19 relief bill. Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin held talks for the second day in a row Tuesday.

On Sunday, Pelosi said that Tuesday would be the deadline for reaching a pre-election deal with the Trump administration on a new coronavirus relief package. But she clarified in an interview with Bloomberg News Tuesday that the aim is to spur the two sides to exchange their best proposals on a host of unresolved issues, not to close out all of their disagreements or have final legislative language at hand.

Google parent Alphabet rose 1.4% after the Justice Department sued the company for antitrust violations. The lawsuit could be an opening salvo ahead of other major government antitrust actions, given ongoing federal probes of other major tech companies, including Apple, Amazon and Facebook. Shares in Apple gained 1.5%, while Amazon added 0.3%. Facebook rose 2.4%.

The Big Tech stocks have been investor favorites this year, because the companies are expected to do well during and after the pandemic. That these companies could one day face the risk of an antitrust case is a risk investors have, or should have, long considered.

“It doesn't look like the market is too worried about it right now,” Horneman said, adding that the stocks' market-leading gains this year suggest traders are not pricing in a major regulatory risk.

Homebuilders rose broadly after the Commerce Department said U.S. home construction rose a solid 1.9% last month after having fallen in August. Applications for building permits, a good sign of future activity, also rose in September. NVR was the biggest gainer, climbing 3.5%.

Procter & Gamble rose 0.4% after the consumer products company reported solid fiscal first-quarter results and raised its earnings outlook. Insurer the Travelers Cos. gained 5.6% after its latest earnings topped Wall Street's estimates, thanks partly to lower-than-expected losses on claims.

Albertsons climbed 5.8% following its latest quarterly results. The supermarket chain benefited from a sharp increase in online and in-store sales as customers continue to stock up on groceries due to the coronavirus. Regions Financial gained 4.9% as traders cheered the bank's latest quarterly results, which included solid fee income from mortgages.

Across the S&P 500, analysts are expecting companies to report another drop in profits for the summer from year-ago levels. But they’re forecasting the decline to moderate from the nearly 32% plunge from the spring as the economy has shown signs of improvement.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 0.79 from 0.78% late Monday.
 
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