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I dislike Daniel Andrews intensely

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On the Belt and Road for Victorians...

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Neil Mitchell says it’s time Australia started standing up for itself against China.

And international security analysts agree.

While China is Victoria’s largest tourism market and major trade partner, there are concerns over espionage, undue influence over politicians and hacking.

Victoria has signed a memorandum of understanding with China on the Belt and Road initiative.

“I think it’s time to tear that deal up,” Neil Mitchell said.

Michael Shoebridge, director of defence and strategy at the Strategic Policy Institute, agrees.

“I think so,” he said.

https://www.3aw.com.au/neil-mitchells-china-concerns-says-its-time-australia-stood-up-for-itself/


What is in the agreement, and what implications does it have for Victoria?
 
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It's amazingly dishonest.
They took the Ombudsman to High Court to try to stop it coming out, all on taxpayers money of course.
They got to her anyway, the report doesn't recommend charges. using public money to affect elections, is there anything lower than that in a democracy? As the Age's reporter Noel Towell states, Labor thinks it dodged a bullet. the voters might have other ideas.
Like I said in another thread, they are all as bad as one another.
 
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Sounds like Daniel has got Victoria, the home of the invincible, into a position it will end up having to live up to.
It's o.k coming into Government and cancelling contracts, then paying a $hit load of money to enact it, well leaving Australia between a China and the U.S might take it to a whole new level.:roflmao:
Apparently the U.S isn't happy with Dan's belt and road deal with China.
Might have to get the CFMEU and the MUA guys to help.:laugh:
 
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Andrews is a traitor.
Politics aside, I do see it as inappropriate for a state government to be dealing with a foreign national government in a manner that's contrary to the views of the Australian Government.

That's akin to an employee defying senior management and doing precisely what they refused to approve. By all means argue the point and make the case but ultimately authority does need to be respected and when it comes to dealings with foreign governments that properly sits with the federal government not the states.

Same goes for any state.:2twocents
 
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Politics aside, I do see it as inappropriate for a state government to be dealing with a foreign national government in a manner that's contrary to the views of the Australian Government.

That's akin to an employee defying senior management and doing precisely what they refused to approve. By all means argue the point and make the case but ultimately authority does need to be respected and when it comes to dealings with foreign governments that properly sits with the federal government not the states.


Same goes for any state.:2twocents
Yes a very awkward situation developing,it will be very interesting to watch this one unfold, could take the foreign affairs department to a whole new level.:D

It really highlights how the States can do what they like, yet the Federal Government will take the can, for what started as a State initiative.:xyxthumbs
 
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Are we at war with China?
No but from memory, borrowing money from overseas, caused Gough a lot of grief.
There appears to be an unwritten protocol, i guess it stops all the Governments from doing backdoor deals with all and sundry.:confused:
No doubt this will come to a head, sooner or later, it usually does.:xyxthumbs
 

wayneL

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The challenges of a federation, or are we a confederation, Daniel?
 

PZ99

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The issue as I see it is that international relations are a federal matter not a state matter.

If the feds were happy with it then no problem. If they're not happy with it well then that's an issue if Victoria still goes ahead. :2twocents

If the feds were not happy with it for political reasons then it voids their grievances IMO.

Especially if helps Victoria repair its budget before anyone else.
 
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Belately I find out that the attack on Andrews has been orchestrated by News Corp.No surprises there.
I'm no fan of News Corp's version of news but ultimately I do question what's going on here.

A state government doing deals with a foreign national government, and a major one at that, is somewhat akin to the office clerk deciding to defy the CEO and board and sign a contract with a company they specifically stated to not do business with. A contract which just happens to affect the entire direction of the company.

Regardless of the arguments for or against the deal and China more generally, such a matter would seem to be one for the Australian Government not any state government.

I'd be saying exactly the same thing if it were SA, NSW or Tas (all Liberal) doing a deal with the US. All fine if the Australian Government has no objection but if the feds do say no well then the state ought to respect that international relations are outside their jurisdiction.

On the other hand, in defence of Dan Andrews, it could be argued that the Australian Government has been so ineffective on all manner of things for quite some time that individuals, businesses and state governments had no real choice other than to take matters into their own hands.

There's a number of policy areas where the feds have given away control in practice simply by not doing anything, thus forcing others to act, which then usually results in the feds getting all excited and starting a fight when they realise someone else has in practice stepped in and set national policy. Listed company AGL found themselves in the firing line at one point with that one over a different issue and it dragged on for quite some time. :2twocents
 
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Well the main question is what happens if Vic default ?

Does the Commonwealth Government have a liability as a guarantor ?

If we consider that the NT has leased its harbour to China and the NT is a Commonwealth responsibility it all gets rather murky as to what is acceptable and what is not

Personally, I believe we need to be more self reliant in financing things, there is plenty of money within OZ that would happily invest in Govt Bonds.

Days gone by there were State Bonds, Federal Bonds and Infrastructure Bonds and to me that is the best way to go. Sell the Bonds to local investors first and only the shortfall being available to OS investors, repaid in OZ dollars on maturity

With the vast sums available in Super Funds surely we can finance our needs from there
 
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I'm no fan of News Corp's version of news but ultimately I do question what's going on here.

A state government doing deals with a foreign national government, and a major one at that, is somewhat akin to the office clerk deciding to defy the CEO and board and sign a contract with a company they specifically stated to not do business with. A contract which just happens to affect the entire direction of the company.

Regardless of the arguments for or against the deal and China more generally, such a matter would seem to be one for the Australian Government not any state government.

I'd be saying exactly the same thing if it were SA, NSW or Tas (all Liberal) doing a deal with the US. All fine if the Australian Government has no objection but if the feds do say no well then the state ought to respect that international relations are outside their jurisdiction.

On the other hand, in defence of Dan Andrews, it could be argued that the Australian Government has been so ineffective on all manner of things for quite some time that individuals, businesses and state governments had no real choice other than to take matters into their own hands.

There's a number of policy areas where the feds have given away control in practice simply by not doing anything, thus forcing others to act, which then usually results in the feds getting all excited and starting a fight when they realise someone else has in practice stepped in and set national policy. Listed company AGL found themselves in the firing line at one point with that one over a different issue and it dragged on for quite some time. :2twocents
Not into this much-but who do state governments borrow money from?Is it only because it is the Chinese?I know that the French own utilities in Australia-sold be state governments etc.
 

PZ99

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'Prepare for worst-case scenario': China ramps up military amid rising global tensions
China’s leader has told its military to step up its preparedness for armed combat, as relations with Australia and the US continues to deteriorate.

https://www.news.com.au/technology/...s/news-story/8f16a5da11a10ee66186146a0dcdb946
And what exactly does this have to do with Daniel Andrews ?

Are you saying it's the Victorian Govt making the CCP angry and not the federal Govt ?
 
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