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Why is Australian dollar behaving like emerging market currency in 2018?

Discussion in 'Forex and Cryptocurrencies' started by helpme, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. helpme

    helpme

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    [​IMG]

    It shares the same "humiliation" as Indonesian rupiah and Indian rupee in 2018. This is quite unbelievable given that Australia is a developed country and extremely resilient economically. Its resilience can be seen by being recession-free for the past 25 years.

    What happened in 2018?
     
    noirua likes this.
  2. greggles

    greggles I'll be back!

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    Here's Morgan Stanley's explanation:
    More here: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/...lia-dollar-rba-rate-cut-morgan-stanley-2018-9
     
  3. sptrawler

    sptrawler

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    Well you would have to agree with that prognosis greggles. :xyxthumbs

    We want to have a first World currency, with a third World economy, electricity unreliable and expensive, wages high output low, debt high and becoming more unaffordable.
    Sounds like a slide to me.:roflmao:
     
  4. TheBigKangaroo

    TheBigKangaroo

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    Is it not simply because we are so small as an economy? That is a question...not a statement..
     
  5. noirua

    noirua

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    In 2016, the Australian dollar was the fifth most traded currency in the world, accounting for 6.9% of the world's daily share (down from 8.6% in 2013).[4] It trades in the world foreign exchange markets behind the US dollar, the euro, the yen and the pound sterling.[5] The Australian dollar is popular with currency traders, because of the comparatively high interest rates in Australia, the relative freedom of the foreign exchange market from government intervention, the general stability of Australia's economy and political system, and the prevailing view that the Australian dollar offers diversification benefits in a portfolio containing the major world currencies, especially because of its greater exposure to Asian economies and the commodities cycle.[6] The currency is commonly referred to by foreign-exchange traders as the "Aussie dollar".
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_dollar

    ---

    Due to being such a traded currency there is a need for greater stability. Not too long ago it was par to the United States Dollar and then it was nearly two to US currency. Unfortunately from outside Australia it is also seen as a gamble. Some wait for weakness as this signals greater profitability for mining stocks and at a certain point the world piles in. Up goes the Aussie until eventually the world piles out again.
    From this there is a need to have a fixed value against the US dollar. However, there is a need for Australia to have vast gold reserves to defend the currency at times and a flexible approach. That can only happen if a law is passed that makes gold miners have to give first option to buy gold to the Australian Government. This would also be at a discount to the market price that might annoy some miners, and flexible royalties.
     
  6. TheBigKangaroo

    TheBigKangaroo

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    Wow... I need your level of knowledge. Thanks for that
     
  7. Freevestor

    Freevestor

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    A bit of an overreaction. The RBA was jawboning weakness into the AUD for the longest time. It has not lost "status".
     
  8. tinhat

    tinhat Pocket Calculator Operator

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    Australia is a net importer of capital and has been since the establishment of the colony in New South Wales. It is trapped with national capital and current account characteristic of a developing country with little prospect of ever maturing into an economy that might pay it off.
     
  9. sptrawler

    sptrawler

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    Probably because we as a Country, own very little of the productive side of the economy, we work for Companies that are probably overseas majority owned.
    We pay taxes so the Government can supply us services and welfare, we borrow money from a Bank to buy a house, which the Bank has borrowed from overseas to lend to us.
    That is where a tax on volume of raw materials exported, is the only way we can inject outside money into our economy.
    We have nothing to sell to overseas buyers, other than raw materials, due to our fortunate position of having one of the lowest removal costs in the World.
    When that is depleted it is game over. IMO
    Until then we are a First World economy, with all the living standard trappings that go with it, until then we can pander to the "what about me" mentality.
     
  10. notting

    notting

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    Went long on the AU last night.
    I reckon it's done.
     
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