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Wage earner statistics

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Hi,

Where would I find statistics about which % of the population you are in for a particular income.

For example, if I earned in round figures $100,000 would I be in the top 20%? 10%? 5%? Where would I find the latest information on that?

Thanks
BK
 

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Cat. No. 2068.0 - 2006 Census Tables
2006 Census of Population and Housing
Australia (Australia)
GROSS INDIVIDUAL INCOME (WEEKLY- INCLUDING ANNUAL RANGES)(a)
Count of persons aged 15 years and over
Based on place of usual residence


Persons

Negative Income 77,826
Nil Income 1,062,674
$1-$149 ($1-$7,799) 1,103,113
$150-$249 ($7,800-$12,999) 2,220,044
$250-$399 ($13,000-$20,799) 2,063,609
$400-$599 ($20,800-$31,199) 2,171,002
$600-$799 ($31,200-$41,599) 1,692,280
$800-$999 ($41,600-$51,999) 1,257,550
$1,000-$1,299 ($52,000-$67,599) 1,230,053
$1,300-$1,599 ($67,600-$83,199) 675,681
$1,600-$1,999 ($83,200-$103,999) 395,580
$2,000 or more ($104,000 or more) 551,753
Not stated 1,416,911
Total 15,918,076

(a) Includes the gross income (including pensions and allowances) that the person usually receives each week.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2007


Don't know if this helps - quite out of date now of course, I was hoping that the most recent census info would be available, but no.
http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/ABSNavigation/prenav/ViewData?breadcrumb=POTLD&method=Place of Usual Residence&subaction=-1&issue=2006&producttype=Census Tables&documentproductno=0&textversion=false&documenttype=Details&collection=Census&javascript=true&topic=Income (Personal - Family %26 Household)&action=404&productlabel=Gross Individual Income (weekly - including annual ranges)&order=1&period=2006&tabname=Details&areacode=0&navmapdisplayed=true&
 
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Brad, does it really matter? Would it make you feel so much better if you were at the 10% mark compared to the 15% mark? If you were to know the exact percentage, is it something that you then intend to brag about? No-one will CARE.

If you're on 6 figures (and good onya if you are) then all you need to know is that you are earning above the average. Isn't that good enough?
 
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Brad, does it really matter? Would it make you feel so much better if you were at the 10% mark compared to the 15% mark? If you were to know the exact percentage, is it something that you then intend to brag about? No-one will CARE.

If you're on 6 figures (and good onya if you are) then all you need to know is that you are earning above the average. Isn't that good enough?

Hi Eager, dont be so eager to assume why I am asking. They are purely pragmatic reasons... I was speaking with a friend today who was lamenting her wage, and I asked her what she was on... $105,000 she said! and I said, 'WHAT! the!' ... you are much better than 20% of the population... and I thought... errr... maybe 5%... errr maybe 10%... hell, hang on, 'I'll find out!

And that is genuine. It's not like me going into the pharmacy and saying, 'Hey, so I have this FRIEND of mine, who has a nasty rash on his nasties... and I'd like some cream to help him clear it up'...

And so, here I am :)

Brad
 
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One thing I've noticed is that high income earners in general tend to overstate what an "average" wage is. Just something I've noticed over the years, and I dare say that a few on here will be somewhat surprised by how low the income of a large section of the population really is. :2twocents
 
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It really doesn't matter if you are on $100K or $50K as long as your spending is less than your income and your investments are positively geared, you will do fine.
Eventually your investments should realise a capital gain and you aren't going into debt with your spending.
The proviso is you keep your job and don't get too stressed.:D
 
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It really doesn't matter if you are on $100K or $50K as long as your spending is less than your income and your investments are positively geared, you will do fine.
Eventually your investments should realise a capital gain and you aren't going into debt with your spending.
The proviso is you keep your job and don't get too stressed.:D
Agreed with what you're saying but $50K is wealthy compared to the situation faced by many.

The wealth divide is much greater than many imagine and I say that as someone who has personally experienced both sides of it.:2twocents
 
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Agreed with what you're saying but $50K is wealthy compared to the situation faced by many.

The wealth divide is much greater than many imagine and I say that as someone who has personally experienced both sides of it.:2twocents

Mate I have arrived at a town in the NW of WA with a wife and two kids in tow and $60 in my pocket in the early 80's. That was after a construction job where we were on strike more than we worked. Great wages but you lost it all and more with the strikes.
Had to go to the company and demand they give me some reimbursement or I would have to move on.
We baby boomers have all had to do it tough, despite what the media would have you believe.
There is opportunity out there for those who want it.
 
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Cat. No. 2068.0 - 2006 Census Tables
2006 Census of Population and Housing
Australia (Australia)
GROSS INDIVIDUAL INCOME (WEEKLY- INCLUDING ANNUAL RANGES)(a)
Count of persons aged 15 years and over
Based on place of usual residence


Persons

Negative Income 77,826
Nil Income 1,062,674
$1-$149 ($1-$7,799) 1,103,113
$150-$249 ($7,800-$12,999) 2,220,044
$250-$399 ($13,000-$20,799) 2,063,609
$400-$599 ($20,800-$31,199) 2,171,002
$600-$799 ($31,200-$41,599) 1,692,280
$800-$999 ($41,600-$51,999) 1,257,550
$1,000-$1,299 ($52,000-$67,599) 1,230,053
$1,300-$1,599 ($67,600-$83,199) 675,681
$1,600-$1,999 ($83,200-$103,999) 395,580
$2,000 or more ($104,000 or more) 551,753
Not stated 1,416,911
Total 15,918,076

(a) Includes the gross income (including pensions and allowances) that the person usually receives each week.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2007


Don't know if this helps - quite out of date now of course, I was hoping that the most recent census info would be available, but no.
http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/ABSNavigation/prenav/ViewData?breadcrumb=POTLD&method=Place of Usual Residence&subaction=-1&issue=2006&producttype=Census Tables&documentproductno=0&textversion=false&documenttype=Details&collection=Census&javascript=true&topic=Income (Personal - Family %26 Household)&action=404&productlabel=Gross Individual Income (weekly - including annual ranges)&order=1&period=2006&tabname=Details&areacode=0&navmapdisplayed=true&
That would put the average income somewhere around $20-30k gross, just a guestimate, that's a far cry from the touted $60k+ average wage. Or is the touted $60k+ figure a household income not individual income?

Cheers
 
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One thing I've noticed is that high income earners in general tend to overstate what an "average" wage is.

I agree Smurf. I know Uni graduates who are on under 40k with a full time job.

On the flip side, l also met a lot of people who graduated from uni in WA who went to work in the mines in a totally different field to what they had studied. Doubled their pay overnight washing dishes.
 

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That would put the average income somewhere around $20-30k gross, just a guestimate, that's a far cry from the touted $60k+ average wage. Or is the touted $60k+ figure a household income not individual income?

Cheers
The $20k and below would be age pensioners and the unemployed.
Also, the figures are 5 years old.
 
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Statistics say the "average wage earner" is somewhere around $60K.

Now, it's no secret that many people are earning much more than this, including many on over $100K. It therefore follows that many employed people are earning less than the average.

I'd like to believe that there is opportunity for everyone and to some extent there is. But how many bosses will even give an unemployed 50 year old an interview no matter what their skills and background? And who ever came up with that "over qualified" excuse to discriminate?

There's a lot of people doing it tough out there.
 
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Really? What fields are they working in?

My first job in investment banking (this is about 8 years ago) was ~$40k/year and we were expected to work harder than Japanese beavers. I know grads in architecture don't get much; I'd be surprised if they were earning over $40k.
 
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Hours worked is another consideration and one I've always thought the income tax system should take account of.

I just can't see that it is reasonable to apply the same rate of tax to someone who earned $100K working 12 hours a day, 7 days a week versus someone earning the same money working 9 to 5 Monday to Friday. They both have the same income, but one clearly is doing it hard relative to the other.

And before anyone says otherwise, I can assure you that there are people doing 12 hours / day every day of the week. Been there, done that...

It's also a relevant consideration in the context of graduate wages. Maybe the money isn't too bad, but who will still be there at 8 pm on a regular basis? It won't be the senior staff that's for sure...
 
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Fashion industry. Small firm. Guess she is doing the hard yards now while she is young and doesn't have too many responsibilities (i.e., mortgage etc etc).

Fashion is a desirable industry to work in - therefore less $$$ on the table for employee's. They run massive margins so don't ask me how - but it's the prestige...kind of like working in an ad agency or creative...perceived fun jobs but no real $$$ in it.

Tip the scales and work in a bank - rigid/boring style work but much better pay. Have a friend who is an assistant product manager and is on 92k :confused: ...only 23 too.
 
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