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Violence... The New Face of Australia

Tisme

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Well we all know about the kid who was killed by two thugs recently who thought hitting him uber hard in the head was funny;

then the drunk in Mt Isa who took out a woman door steward

and the latest:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/ne...ictim-in-surgery/story-fni0cx12-1227701627933


What a great country we are now living in.

I'd like to see how many of the perps are homegrown or if we have indeed imported a disease.
 
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Well we all know about the kid who was killed by two thugs recently who thought hitting him uber hard in the head was funny;

then the drunk in Mt Isa who took out a woman door steward

and the latest:

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/ne...ictim-in-surgery/story-fni0cx12-1227701627933


What a great country we are now living in.

I'd like to see how many of the perps are homegrown or if we have indeed imported a disease.

As I see it there are a number of causes of our violent society.

* alcohol and drug abuse and a "larrikan" approach to alcohol fuelled by alcohol advertising and easy availability of alcohol in supermarkets,

* inadequate regulation of under age drinking

* the wrong people having children because it is now profitable to do so via family payments.

* an over desire by family authorities to "keep families together" rather than removing children from abusive environments and therefore children inherit that abuse and pass it on to their own children.

* lax penalties for domestic and drug/alcohol induced violence and a view from some police administration that DV in particular is not their problem.

* unwillingness of politicians to be seen as nanny state proponents.

* lack of pre marriage guidance and counselling or any general relationship counselling in schools.

* I don't see any politicians except maybe Fred Nile willing to crack down on the alcohol giants because most pollies are in the company's pockets.
 
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As I see it there are a number of causes of our violent society.

* alcohol and drug abuse and a "larrikan" approach to alcohol fuelled by alcohol advertising and easy availability of alcohol in supermarkets,

* inadequate regulation of under age drinking

* the wrong people having children because it is now profitable to do so via family payments.

* an over desire by family authorities to "keep families together" rather than removing children from abusive environments and therefore children inherit that abuse and pass it on to their own children.

* lax penalties for domestic and drug/alcohol induced violence and a view from some police administration that DV in particular is not their problem.

* unwillingness of politicians to be seen as nanny state proponents.

* lack of pre marriage guidance and counselling or any general relationship counselling in schools.

* I don't see any politicians except maybe Fred Nile willing to crack down on the alcohol giants because most pollies are in the company's pockets.
Good post SirRumpole. I agree with all your points.
 

skc

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As I see it there are a number of causes of our violent society.
Prevalence of smart phones and other CCTV video recordings along with easy distribution on social media probably increases the number of incidences brought to the public's attention.
 

Ves

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Prevalence of smart phones and other CCTV video recordings along with easy distribution on social media probably increases the number of incidences brought to the public's attention.
I agree and would also include the 24/7 media cycle.

I would be very surprised if the crime statistics for violent crime are at their highest point in recorded history, let alone significantly above (which most of the media uproar lately seems to imply).

I recall in the past years up to around 2014 (when I last looked) they were actually in a down-trend since about 1999-2000.
 

explod

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I agree and would also include the 24/7 media cycle.

I would be very surprised if the crime statistics for violent crime are at their highest point in recorded history, let alone significantly above (which most of the media uproar lately seems to imply).

I recall in the past years up to around 2014 (when I last looked) they were actually in a down-trend since about 1999-2000.
One apon a time 12 year old Johnny went with his Dad and all the other members of the tribe up into the hills and valleys hunting for the evining feast. Young Mary and her Mum picked berries and collected honey nearby and then tidied the cave. And this over millions of years, its in our jeans.

When I was 14 I left school and worked on our farm, at 15 shearing sheds, 16 a builders laborer and most of my other mates all did the same. We worked hard, tired in the evening then slept well. Never had a drink till I was 18. And you could walk into a job anywhere.

The world has changed and in my view its not the fault of the young it is the way we have the world today.

How do we fix it?
 

Ves

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These http://www.aic.gov.au/dataTools/facts/vicViolentRate.html figures show the trends in certain crimes, these http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current series/rip/21-40/rip29.html show trends for violent assaults which have increased over the period of the stats.
There's data that goes back a long, long way, but it's probably never been put together in one report and compared. I'm not sure if 1993 was a low point, but I assume the crime statistics are pretty cyclical, looking at the graph in those links you provided.

Unfortunately it's almost impossible to find anything depicted on a 100 year graph or a similarly long period. You could probably patch together a lot of the academic research reports from the early 1990s (that review the prior 20 years), but I don't really have the time.

Until I see this it's pretty hard to say how bad our current time is compared to history. It's definitely better than the early 2000s?
 
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Until I see this it's pretty hard to say how bad our current time is compared to history. It's definitely better than the early 2000s?
I don't think it really matters how historically bad or good the assault data is, we should aim to improve as a society.

Possibly a better measure rather than incidents reported to the police, is hospital admissions or attendances by paramedics to assaults.

Anecdotally these appear to be increasing, although whether the actual data is available I don't really know.
 

Bill M

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Lack of RESPECT for each other is a major problem. If a lady doorperson says, sorry sir you have had too much to drink then that's that, off I go home. But the young idiots can't handle that so they bash her, absolutely no RESPECT. If a cop pulls me over and says, I noticed you swerved back there for no reason so I am going to breath test you, I submit to a breath test, no problems. Some idiots do a U turn and get the Police involved in a dangerous high speed chase. There is no RESPECT for anybody these days.

I saw a 20 something idiot one day abuse an elderly lady for taking too long to back out of a parking space. In my day we were told to RESPECT your elders, these days people have no fear bashing and abusing elders.

There is also no RESPECT for property. The other morning I went out at 8 am only to see some drunks had pulled out several road signs overnight. Now we have to wait for weeks for the council to re cement them in. Graffiti is a problem in all suburbs now too.

And what's with all the littering? It is not uncommon these days to find piles of bottles and McDonald's wrappers just turfed out in car parks and green areas. I mean this is where we live and yet again no RESPECT for the environment.

It is getting worse and worse and the key could be to teach kids while they are young what RESPECT really is. In the 70's we had a rubbish problem in Australia, the Government ran a series of ads in order to clean up. Phrases like "Don't Rubbish Australia" and "Drop something Sport". Now a days nothing, just throw it in the river.

Unfortunately for my wife and I we are contemplating going into a retirement village for seniors, at least we will get security and piece and quiet in there and we won't need to deal with the idiots in the community. We don't walk around anywhere at night anymore, it just isn't worth the risk. I am saddened to see the way Australia is going.
 
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These http://www.aic.gov.au/dataTools/facts/vicViolentRate.html figures show the trends in certain crimes, these http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current series/rip/21-40/rip29.html show trends for violent assaults which have increased over the period of the stats.
*Reported* assaults have increased. As that measures domestic as well as non-domestic it's hardly surprising. Women undoubtedly feel more comfortable today reporting domestic assault than they did 25-30 years ago.

Australia is not a violent society.
 

Ves

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I don't think it really matters how historically bad or good the assault data is, we should aim to improve as a society.
It does matter, because the statistics will show the long-term trends (whether they are good, bad or static). Using this information you at least have some basis investigating what has and has not historically worked (ie. education, policing numbers and policing methods used, social initiatives). Not that it's a hugely reliable method, but it's better than random guessing.

Possibly a better measure rather than incidents reported to the police, is hospital admissions or attendances by paramedics to assaults.

Anecdotally these appear to be increasing, although whether the actual data is available I don't really know.
That'd probably show a trend of some sort as well, but like you I'm not sure these are available, or even recorded in a helpful fashion.
 

Tisme

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I have noticed an increased tendency of the local guys down the local to deck someone if they look at them wrong.

I'm told by the same locals that they don't handle the steroids and ICE all that well ... I tend to agree with them....very politely.
 

Logique

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Agree with points above, but also,

No jobs for the kids
Education almost unaffordable
Runaway house prices, unaffordable to the kids
Teachers with their hands tied, male teachers driven out
Police with their hands tied
No parent at home, both working

Who could blame the kids for the sense of hopelessness, even abandonment, that so many feel.
 
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I don't know that violence has somehow not been an integral part of Australia. We started as a convict colony for 50 years with institutionalised brutality being a large part of our reality.

In 2016 however I think one of the biggest impacts on the amount of extreme violence in the community is the effects of ice use. Police and medical staff have repeatedly made the point about just how dangerous "off their head" ice addicts are.

There are a score of media stories. I have just cited one

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-...tline-of-ice-epidemic-fear-for-safety/6549150
 
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I don't know that violence has somehow not been an integral part of Australia. We started as a convict colony for 50 years with institutionalised brutality being a large part of our reality.

In 2016 however I think one of the biggest impacts on the amount of extreme violence in the community is the effects of ice use. Police and medical staff have repeatedly made the point about just how dangerous "off their head" ice addicts are.

There are a score of media stories. I have just cited one

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-...tline-of-ice-epidemic-fear-for-safety/6549150
Maybe the paramedics will have to start carrying Tasers.
 

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