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Think and Grow Rich

hangseng

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Possibly the best book I have ever read and have mentioned here previously in the beginners thread.

I read this book first when I was 17 and then read it every year until I was 30 after my grandfather gave me his copy with a personal message to me to "read every birthday until I turned 30". I am now 54 but still never tire of a refresher read and having lost my original copy I came across this today.

Highly recommend read to anyone of any discipline, it eventually aided significantly in changing my thoughts and along with it my life, especially chapter 3.

I attribute much of my success today to my grandfather for giving me that book with his sage words.

Think and Grow Rich
by Napoleon Hill


http://www.utopianwebstrategy.com.au/uws/wp-content/uploads/think-and-grow-rich-napoleon-hill.pdf

ps:

If you don't like Ebooks (I don't much) then go to the ASF Shop and they have it for sale as hard copy book for only $22.45. Be one of the best investments you ever made.
ASF Shop: http://www.moneybags.com.au/default.asp?d=0&t=1&id=5395&c=0&a=74
 
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Would put it up there as one of the best books that I have ever read also, wish I was 17 when I read it, though I'm not too sure it would have changed me that much then, as compared to the change it instilled in me at the age of 34..
I was amazed to discover that the stuff I somewhat inherently knew deep inside , was also shared by others.
Stuff, I couldn't have put into words myself, but here it was almost perfectly described in a book.

I was given the book by an almost stranger, a guy that used to have a small business next to where I worked at the time, I guess he must have seen the potential to change a life for the better, or at least open my eyes to the possibilities..
I haven't looked back since, and indeed he was the one that got me involved in share trading, thanks Ian....
I have passed the book on to others, some have benefited some not, and have lost seveal copies....

I am on holidays soon, so Might read it again, it's been around 17 years...!!
 

hangseng

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I have passed the book on to others, some have benefited some not,
Yes it is one of those books you can share and even if one person gets the benefit it has been worth it.

My driving force...to freely share information and knowledge...from that I to think and grow rich in more ways than one.

Some get it some don't, but when they do it is like a bright light and alarm bells going off. So simple yet so effective.
 

Julia

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With apologies for being a bit facetious, I found this on my father's bookshelf when I was 14. On one side of it was "The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders" and on the other "Lady Chatterley's Lover".

Not too many guesses regarding which held the most appeal at the time.:)
 
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Anyone remember Kiyosaki getting [rightly imo] hammered by 4 Corners over a course known as "Money and You"?
 

So_Cynical

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Possibly the best book I have ever read and have mentioned here previously in the beginners thread.

I read this book first when I was 17 and then read it every year until I was 30 after my grandfather gave me his copy with a personal message to me to "read every birthday until I turned 30". I am now 54 but still never tire of a refresher read and having lost my original copy I came across this today.
I first read it when i was about 20...i thought it was a crock of dated, feel good, think positive crap, i was living rough in the bush at the time and vaguely remember using the book as toilet paper.
 

Wysiwyg

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I first read it when i was about 20...i thought it was a crock of dated, feel good, think positive crap, i was living rough in the bush at the time and vaguely remember using the book as toilet paper.
What was the Paper Bark a bit coarse for your fat white ass back then?
 
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Would put it up there as one of the best books that I have ever read also, wish I was 17 when I read it, though I'm not too sure it would have changed me that much then, as compared to the change it instilled in me at the age of 34..
I was amazed to discover that the stuff I somewhat inherently knew deep inside , was also shared by others.
Stuff, I couldn't have put into words myself, but here it was almost perfectly described in a book.

I was given the book by an almost stranger, a guy that used to have a small business next to where I worked at the time, I guess he must have seen the potential to change a life for the better, or at least open my eyes to the possibilities..
I haven't looked back since, and indeed he was the one that got me involved in share trading, thanks Ian....
I have passed the book on to others, some have benefited some not, and have lost seveal copies....

I am on holidays soon, so Might read it again, it's been around 17 years...!!
I am reading this at the moment.. Im up to the Chapter on "How to outwit the six ghosts of fear"

What version do you read?

Has anyone gone on to read "the LAW OF SUCCESS"?


It is written at the end of the book "If i had a young son I would insist that he read every word of the Law of Success by Napoleon Hill"

"No matter whether you are rich or poor - you have one great asset as great as the richest man living - and that is ....... pg 381
 
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from Saturdays SMH:

" TYCOONS TAKE ON MISERY OF MONEY by Robert Frank.

Felix Dennis,the shaggy British publishing tycoon, poet and author, always seems to have wise words about getting and being rich.
In his first book, How To Get Rich, Dennis posited that anyone with $US2million to $US4million in assets is merely "comfortably poor". For him it takes $US150million to be truly rich. He also delivered some memorable (and very true) one-liners such as The richer you are and the more financial advisors you employ, the less likelihood there is that you can ever discover what you are really worth. Of spending he wrote " If it flies, floats or fornicates, always rent it."
Dennis has a new book called The Narrow Road. Most of the book is a life map for entrepreneurs but he also dispenses some advice on being rich and what money doesnt buy.
There is happiness of course but Dennis writes that wealth also breeds a kind of permanent malcontent. Large wealth, he says "is certain to impose a degree of disharmony and irritation, if not from the stress and strains involved in obtaining and protecting it, then from the guilt that inevitably accompanies its arrival.
Poverty is even less fun of course but he says the rich are not a contented tribe. The demands of others to share their wealth becomes so tiresome, so insistant, they often decide they must insulate themselves. Insulation eventually breeds a mild form of paranoia. He says the only people the rich can truly trust are the people they knew before they became wealthy."

Ithink I'll settle for being "comfortably poor".
 

Julia

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Ithink I'll settle for being "comfortably poor".
Given the definition of this above, that seems pretty insulting to those who are genuinely and heartbreakingly poor.
 
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Given the definition of this above, that seems pretty insulting to those who are genuinely and heartbreakingly poor.
?????????????

In the last two years I have "transferred"/given over half my "comfortably poorness" to some of those that were "less well off" and find your post particularly insulting (one step past "pretty" insulting). But then I am used to being insulted on ASF.
 
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?????????????

In the last two years I have "transferred"/given over half my "comfortably poorness" to some of those that were "less well off" and find your post particularly insulting (one step past "pretty" insulting). But then I am used to being insulted on ASF.
What she means is that someone with $4m claiming to be "comfortably poor" obviously isn't in the same plight as someone whose net worth depends on receiving their social security cheque each fortnight.
 

Julia

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What she means is that someone with $4m claiming to be "comfortably poor" obviously isn't in the same plight as someone whose net worth depends on receiving their social security cheque each fortnight.
Exactly right, Tyler. Thank you.

Nioka, I'd have thought my meaning quite obvious.
 

Bill M

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Poverty is even less fun of course but he says the rich are not a contented tribe. The demands of others to share their wealth becomes so tiresome, so insistant, they often decide they must insulate themselves. Insulation eventually breeds a mild form of paranoia. He says the only people the rich can truly trust are the people they knew before they became wealthy."
I have a friend who is worth $2 Million. He is so afraid to get into any long term relationship with a woman that he just lives alone. He is retired but paranoid that people are just trying to rip him off. Luckily I've been his mate for 30 years and he trusts me, your article is correct in many cases.
 
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I have a friend who is worth $2 Million. He is so afraid to get into any long term relationship with a woman that he just lives alone. He is retired but paranoid that people are just trying to rip him off. Luckily I've been his mate for 30 years and he trusts me, your article is correct in many cases.
Why not put his $$$ into a trust, run by a Pty Ltd company and sign a Cohabitation agreement with any future women? I know plenty of rich people who do this and don't have any problems with the other sex.
 

hangseng

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One thing I learnt form this book was that true "wealth", "happiness" and "success" could not be bought by money.

I get far more happiness in my life helping those in need, my personal wealth merely enables this.

I truly feel sorry for those that lock themselves away from life for fear of being ripped off by someone. They are self imposed prisoners and definitely not rich in anything but money.

If they read "Think and Grow Rich" they missed the point.
 

Julia

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I have a friend who is worth $2 Million. He is so afraid to get into any long term relationship with a woman that he just lives alone. He is retired but paranoid that people are just trying to rip him off. Luckily I've been his mate for 30 years and he trusts me, your article is correct in many cases.
That sounds like more a personal psychological block with your friend than a reflection of reality. Perhaps he just likes living alone.

If he really can't think of how to protect his $2M (which isn't that great a fortune in reality) then I'm a bit surprised he was able to acquire it in the first place.

One thing I learnt form this book was that true "wealth", "happiness" and "success" could not be bought by money.
I know what you mean, but always with this comment which comes up frequently, is the proviso that it's damn hard to be happy if you are poor in the sense of being without enough money to provide security.

I truly feel sorry for those that lock themselves away from life for fear of being ripped off by someone. They are self imposed prisoners and definitely not rich in anything but money.
Yes, agree, but don't believe it applies to very many people who would not be somewhat asocial in the first place.

To be ripped off, the so called rich person has to allow that to happen. Why would they?
 
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