Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

The Reset and its implications for your finances: how to profit from it?

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You would fit perfectly Rob, Seriously: you should consider it
Perfect food and landscape, and ideology 100% within your line

So obviously not missing it, the less i know about it the less i want to cry..
And from anger, not sorrow or homesickness
I have absolutely loved staying in the French countryside in numerous overseas holidays there since the 1980s, so I am a long time convert. Would you believe when my father and I stayed at a French hotel in the middle of the WW1 battlefields where Australia lost many lives, the locals at the pub sang "Waltzing Matilda" to us when they learned we were Australians and not Poms!
But this is very off-topic comment and there are complaints elsewhere!
On topic, I posted my thoughts in this thread earlier.
Whether or not you are a trader or investor, ultimately its your assets that will be affected no matter what form or class those assets belong to.
The trick will be to work out which tangible assets will continue to be demand.
I don't own crystal balls.
 

Dona Ferentes

NEMO SIBI NASCITVR
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Don't know about profiting from the reset, but there's a certain amount of distrust/ empowerment/ desire to control one's own affairs at play:
Almost $42bn will be withdrawn from workers’ retirement savings, exceeding initial forecasts by nearly 50 per cent and fuelling concerns among superannuation funds that the government is misusing the system to help it navigate the coronavirus crisis.

Treasury has revised its estimate about how much money will be withdrawn from the super system from $29.5bn to $41.9bn in light of the take-up of the early release scheme[&]d to extend it until the end of the year

This represents about 1.5 per cent of the $2.7 trillion superannuation system, with more than 2.6 million Australians having taken up the program to help support themselves through the pandemic.

Government analysis of banking sector data has indicated the “vast majority” of the early release payments are being saved, placed in offset accounts to reduce mortgage interest payments or put towards debt repayment.

About 58 per cent of early release payments are classified as “saved/unspent” and remain in workers’ accounts.
- more like battening down for a rainy day, individually and collectively, rather than letting the 'entitlement brigade' (by how much did their pay reduce, lately?) take their clip
 
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Don't know about profiting from the reset, but there's a certain amount of distrust/ empowerment/ desire to control one's own affairs at play:- more like battening down for a rainy day, individually and collectively, rather than letting the 'entitlement brigade' (by how much did their pay reduce, lately?) take their clip
Absolutely spot on.:xyxthumbs
We are looking after your future "trust us".
 
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Don't forget not all the people who lost their jobs got Jobseeker/keeper !

Those left out such as casual workers, part-timers, artists and musicians etc would be the ones really feeling the pain and drawing on their Super for survival purposes. Not the full timers who lost work and getting Jobkeeper and using the Super as a luxury ATM or for pulling funds out and keeping it at hand for a "rainy day" in case the rules change and can't access Super again.
 
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I have a personal very negative view on what is happening but realise how futile resistance is.
Truely astonished by even reasonably intelligent and educated able to be manipulated so easily whereas facts and figures are available for all to see
So how do you/ I navigate this sad new world and avoid becoming an economic casualty, potentially even profiting from it
The pillars of economic wellness:in our new world:
Income: jobkeeper/jobseeker
Knowledge: education:in trading,languages for escape
Investment: silver PM and unseizable assets
Compounding returns..well not in term deposit or bonds
Diversification : well ,have to take that with a grain of salt, but currencies at least
Using other people money:
Loans.. so hard for me to do that.need to unlearn
Last ones: enjoy but do not own
Lease,company or trust structure.

Family stability. Lockdown does not help

What am i missing?
No, you are spot on. I think in a similar way. It's tempting to go deep into loans and load up to your eye-balls as lenders are waving the carrot on a stick with ~2% offers. I'll pass, because this new world will also meet reality... some day.
 
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Don't forget not all the people who lost their jobs got Jobseeker/keeper !

Those left out such as casual workers, part-timers, artists and musicians etc would be the ones really feeling the pain and drawing on their Super for survival purposes. Not the full timers who lost work and getting Jobkeeper and using the Super as a luxury ATM or for pulling funds out and keeping it at hand for a "rainy day" in case the rules change and can't access Super again.
Jobkeeper jobseeker as a shortcut to fake jobs
Straight welfare or PS/fake economy jobs, subsidized or created ones
 
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Absolutely spot on.:xyxthumbs
We are looking after your future "trust us".
I had my doubt after the CC bull**** but there are always potential chances that a prudent attitude can be taken, the ultimate need to go more self suficient and renewable, if we want to scare the people into following the line with CC; why not;
But here we are really taken on a ride worldwide; by the very same people who have no trouble to overfeed us crap with bad food killing millions a year.
Absolutely no trust whatsoever: real question, what do they really want?
 
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