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Renewable energy news

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by BIG BWACULL, May 26, 2007.

  1. BIG BWACULL

    BIG BWACULL

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    Propel B99 In Use Study Finds Biodiesel Runs Equal to, if not Better than, Petro-Diesel
    6 September 2008


    Results of a 13-week test of delivery vehicles fueled with B99 biodiesel showed that the vehicles had no mechanical issues, ran smoother, and had reduced emissions compared to vehicles fueled with petroleum diesel.

    Propel, a renewable fuels retailer, and Seattle-based The Essential Baking Company jointly performed the study. During the 13-week trial, six Essential Baking vehicles fueled with strictly B99 blend biodiesel from Propel’s Clean Fuel Points, traveled approximately 37,000 miles on 2,500 gallons of B99, with one vehicle logging more than 14,000 miles.

    Vehicles selected varied in model, types of routes, and mileage driven. No vehicle failures and no operational issues were experienced. Cold weather proved not to be a problem for the vehicles, even with 32 days when the daily low temperature was below 35 ° F. The majority of drivers reported that the vehicles ran smoother and quieter on B99 than on petro-diesel.

    Propel’s CleanDrive service, an integrated carbon emission reduction tracking platform, automatically tracked gallons used and calculated the fleet’s reduction of CO2 and other pollutants. The results indicated that the delivery vehicles:

    * Reduced their output of CO2 by more than 43,000 pounds;
    * Displaced 1,553 gallons of petroleum oil;
    * Reduced particulate matter (PM) by 78%;
    * Reduced air toxins by 60 to 90%; and
    * Eliminated 100 percent of sulfur compounds from vehicle exhaust.
     
  2. Nashezz

    Nashezz

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    Gee whiz.

    I have to say any study performed by the vested interest has to be taken with a 100kg grain of salt. Doesn't mean their product isn't good nor that it doesn't do what they are saying but I wouldn't be believing a word unless an independent study was done.
     
  3. BIG BWACULL

    BIG BWACULL

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    Yes true but considering the original diesel engine was made to run on biofuels it wouldnt be hard to believe that these findings are somewhat true. Lets make it 50kgs of Salt ok ;)
     
  4. BIG BWACULL

    BIG BWACULL

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    Japan Launching Eco-Rigs to Provide Food, Power
    All we need is kevin costner to make this waterworld a reality lol:D
     
  5. BIG BWACULL

    BIG BWACULL

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  6. BIG BWACULL

    BIG BWACULL

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    A new Crime wave:eek:

    Solar panels are new hot property for thieves

    Glenda Hoffman has an answer for the thieves, should they choose to return to her home in Desert Hot Springs, California. "I have a shotgun right next to the bed and a .22 under my pillow."

    Hoffman was the victim of a theft that one industry professional has dubbed "the crime of the future". Another observer has come up with the term "grand theft solar" to describe the spate of recent burglaries in sunny California.

    In May Hoffman lost 16 solar panels from her roof in three separate burglaries, one while she slept below. Happily for Hoffman her insurers have agreed to pay the $95,000 (£48,000) cost of replacing the panels. But as energy prices soar, and solar power takes off - at least in California - so opportunistic thieves have turned to the lucrative, and complicated, business of dismantling solar panels.

    "I wouldn't say it's pervasive, but it's going on," California Solar Energy Industries Association executive director Sue Kateley told the Valley Times.

    California is the leader for solar installations, with 33,000 across the state. Unsurprisingly, it is also the market leader for thefts of solar installations, although figures are hard to come by.

    "The solar panel thing is pretty new," said Contra Costa county sheriff's office spokesman Jimmy Lee. "We're seeing an increasing number of cases."

    One night in late August, 26 solar panels with a value of $20,000 were stolen from California's first certified organic farm, Star Route Farms in Bolinas, 20 miles up the coast from San Francisco.

    "It's probably easier to steal a $20,000 car," Rob Erlichman, president of Sunlight Electric, which sold the panels to the farm in 2006, told the Point Reyes Light. "To steal that many panels you need a truck and you need guys."

    A few miles inland, in Lafayette, a truck and some guys is just what the thieves had. A resident came home during the day to find three men on the roof of his house and five of his solar panels in the back of a rented truck. The men fled, leaving behind the truck and the panels.

    Ken Martin, who runs a real estate company in Santa Rosa, California, found one day this spring that thieves had removed 58 panels with a value of $75,000 from an office building he owns. His proposed solution is to paint his solar panels bright pink. "At least if someone comes across them and they're painted, they'll know that's my colour," he said.

    Law enforcement and the solar industry suggest other approaches to crime prevention.

    Many companies now sell secure fastenings for solar panels, while some police departments are urging solar power users to inscribe their driving licence number on the panels.

    But some warn that the thieves are too sophisticated to be troubled by such primitive deterrents. Tom McCalmont, who runs Regrid Power in Campbell, close to California's Silicon Valley, said that the sophistication shown by thieves suggests that industry insiders are behind many of the thefts, a suspicion bolstered by supply difficulties with new solar panels.

    McCalmont has experience of solar panel thefts: his own company lost $30,000-worth of panels to burglars this summer. "They knew which wires to cut, which not to cut," he said. "This showed a level of expertise that indicated that whoever did it was from the solar industry."
     
  7. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Solar panel theft is already a big problem. I won't say how we stop it (there's a way that usually works) but those wanting to steal them certainly do go to some fairly extreme lengths to get them. I've replaced a few that have been stolen though.

    But then someone did try and steal a more conventional (hydro) power station not that long ago too. They tried messing with a small one and got a nasty shock (ended up in hospital). And the day he was released from hospital, still in bandages, he tried messing with a bigger one. Some people don't learn... Thankfully he's being kept in prison now, safely away from turbines and switchyards.
     
  8. mullman

    mullman

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    For those of you who may not be aware a good speculative geothermal consideration is GDY Geodynamics. It has major farm ins from Origin Energy and Tata. Ought to be 6-8 weeks out from proof of concept and approx 12 months out from producing energy for Innaminka.
     
  9. Belrose

    Belrose

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    Of course those delightful coal fired power stations look just charming against the landscape spewing out black smoke for kilometers up into the sky ... I understand completely why people wouldn't want those hideous looking solar panels on their roofs or wind turbines in their fields ...

    The world is mad :)
     
  10. Happy

    Happy

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    Eifel Tower was considered ugly too, suppose we have to grow to accept our renewable energy sources or make them more appealing.

    I heard of solar panel with beads instead of flat surface allowing it to maximise solar energy capture without the need for tracking arrangement.

    Wind turbines in a form of cylinders snuggling for example mobile phone towers will be effectively invisible or at least improving appearance of those towers.

    Also why worry about aesthetics if our existence is at stake?
     
  11. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Totally agreed that we shouldn't worry about aesthetics. I'd quite happily put wind turbines where they belong - on the tops of hills and along vast stretches of the coastline. And I've got absolutely no problem with the transmission lines needed to connect them.

    But it's a reality that mainstream environmental lobby groups have successfully opposed rather a lot of renewable (and other) energy projects and it's almost always on the basis of either aesthetics or a high moral principled stand that we shouldn't do anything with even a tiny impact on the environment, visual environment included. End result = more coal burnt.

    I've said it many times on this forum. Develop geothermal flat out, including the water pipelines and large dams that will be needed to make it work. Build solar thermal plants in good locations (inland) and put wind farms where they work too (along the Vic coastline is a truly great location). And build some big hydro (pumped storage) schemes to provide storage and balance the system. And, of course, there's a lot of great big transmission lines to go with all that.

    There's your 100% renewable electricity grid - now all we have to do is use electricity in preference to other fuels and our emissions will be reduced dramatically.

    That's a very different direction to what the so-called environmentalists generally call for however...
     
  12. Buddy

    Buddy

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    Not sure why we keep calling them "environmentalists". Must be some sort of godbothering term, as Garpal G would say. I prefer to use the term "Luddites".
     
  13. noosajohn

    noosajohn

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    Quote "I've said it many times on this forum. Develop geothermal flat out, including the water pipelines and large dams that will be needed to make it work. " Unquote

    Geothermal as per GDY is a closed system. The only thing being removed is heat. No need for water, or dams.

    I hold GDY
     
  14. Elliot

    Elliot

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    Hi All,

    Does anyone else believe that its time to start Investing in Renewable Energy Stocks such as Geothermal, Solar, Wind farms, etc.... Is this the start of a boom for Clean Energy Stocks ?
     
  15. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Dams as in pumped storage hydro.

    Geothermal for baseload (constant output - not technically essential but highly desirable given the capital cost) and pumped storage hydro to balance supply and demand on the grid and also providing backup against the risk of long distance transmission line failure (which may take longer to fix than your average blackout due to remoteness).

    There are numerous sites in SE Australia suitable for such pumped storage schemes.
     
  16. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Two words - sovereign risk.

    The carbon tax makes renewable energy attractive - but that could well change if the government changes. Given the lifespan of renewable energy infrastructure (25 - 90 years), the odds of a policy change during that period are almost certain with the only questions being when and of what magnitude.
     
  17. Wysiwyg

    Wysiwyg Everyone wants money

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    Yet as you mentioned the other day, we have a solar panel manufacturer in Australia that is overcome by Chinese products.
    This government is fulla c-r-a-p.
     
  18. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    At the risk of reviving an old thread for some blatant promotion..... :D:D

    Musselroe wind farm in Tasmania is now generating power into the grid. It is not formally "open" as such, but everything is now on site and some of the turbines are in operation. When complete, it will have 56 turbines each of 3MW capacity.

    For anyone who wants to have a look inside one of these machines, or the site generally, "up close" there's an open day this Saturday 18th May 2013. Buses depart Gladstone (North-East Tas) every 15 minutes 10:30 am to 2:30 pm. No bookings required, just turn up on the day and follow the signs to the buses. Details here. http://www.hydro.com.au/system/files/documents/CommunityOpenDay_A4_singleSided.pdf

    And the next day Sunday 19th May 2013 the doors will be open to the public at Tarraleah power station as part of the Tasmanian Heritage Festival. This is a real working power station still in full use (it is a base load plant running 24/7) despite being 75 years old. Bookings advised for this tour since numbers are limited. Details here. http://www.hydro.com.au/system/files/documents/2013_HeritageFestival.pdf

    :)
     
  19. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    A milestone has been achieved on King Island, with 100% renewable energy into the grid for a sustained period.

    http://www.kingislandrenewableenergy.com.au/news/2013/kireip-reaches-renewable-energy-milestone

    The project technical details are on the website. Still under construction is more energy storage and the smart grid (central control of consumer loads eg water heating) which will further increase the use of renewables (wind and solar) on King Island. This should be up and running later this year.

    Historically, King Island was reliant on diesel for 100% of its' electricity supply. Then some wind turbines were added, then more wind and solar plus the big flywheel and control systems. There was also a large battery although that bit didn't work out too well unfortunately.

    A unique aspect of the King Island system, apart from the technology, is that everything is on the one site. The original diesel power station, flywheel, wind turbines, solar panels and control room are all at the power station rather than being scattered around the place.

    Right now it's sitting on about 75% wind, 25% diesel into the King Island grid. There is also 100% renewable energy (hydro and wind) feeding into the main Tasmanian grid at the moment. :)
     
  20. sydboy007

    sydboy007

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    from thebull newsletter earlier this month

    Dyesol Limited (DYE) is another clean technology company with a potentially revolutionary technology. Since its inception in 2004 the company has been working on commercial applications for something called Dye Solar Cells.

    Dye Solar Cell Technology is third generation solar technology that could replace the silicon based solar cells currently in use. The technology is difficult for the layperson to comprehend but it is something like photosynthesis in nature, using nanotechnology principles, meaning really tiny. A sensitising dye is applied on a membrane to absorb the light and produce electricity.

    Dyesol is not the only organisation pursuing the technology nor did they invent it; but they are considered a leader in offering practical applications for industrial use. The company manufactures the chemicals and equipment that other researchers as well as manufacturers use in their work. India’s Tata steel is working with Dyesol to make steel roofing materials with dye solar cells built in.

    Dyesol on 08 May announced a technical breakthrough that could be a game changer. Although the traditional dye solar cell had the advantage of production efficiency and low cost, the use of liquid electrolytes in the process made the cells less than fully effective in certain weather conditions. Solid state dyes as of 2010 were yielding dye solar cell performance of 5%, far lower than liquid based cells. Dyesol’s announcement claims the company has achieved solid-state DSC efficiency of 11.3% at full sun – more than twice as efficient.

    The company went on to say that efficiencies of 10% in actual industrial use are possible due to the simplicity of working with solid-state systems. Dyesol's technology allows the production of solar energy at a lower cost than traditional solar cells and operates more efficiently in low light conditions. Think of the potential of glass panels and metal sheets in construction use with the ability to generate electricity.

    On 28 May the company was out with another announcement. The Photovoltaic Industry sets a standard for solar cell durability and Dyesol’s current liquid based systems exceeded that standard by 400%. The company is planning similar evaluations for its solid-state systems. Dyesol will continue its work with both liquid based and solid state technologies since each has qualities that lead to better performance in specific industrial applications.

    ------------------

    Ocean waves are alternative energy sources that do not generate the same excitement amongst investors as do solar and wind. Carnegie Wave Energy (CWE) is an alternative energy company with a patented technology that can not only turn ocean waves into energy, but into desalinated water as well. The company has over 67 patents on its CETO technology, which unlike others makes use of submerged wave power systems. Submersible power generators give this technology a significant advantage over wind and solar with its small and unobtrusive footprint. The public is hungry for clean affordable power from wind and solar, but few people relish the thought of living in the vicinity of a vast solar or wind farm. In addition, unlike the wind, wave power is ever present.

    CWE has a licensing agreement with French energy company EDF and will continue its efforts towards global commercialisation of CETO technology through such licensing arrangements. The company has a demonstration project underway in Perth which upon completion will be the first large scale CETO system directly connected to the Grid in the world. Carnegie has similar projects underway in conjunction with its French partner EDF as well as in Canada, Bermuda, and Ireland.
     
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