Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

Renewable energy news

Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
Thought i'd start a thread on a topic that will effect us and our childrens future, Here you can post anything that relates to renewables, from links to companies, photos, discussion or whatever O.K Sweet:D (oh i finally found the start a thread button, Can i get a woohoo) I start with a pic or two

EVM or enviromission plan to build some of these solar towers
 

Attachments

Joined
May 6, 2007
Posts
197
Reactions
0
gday,

i hope our kids can thank us in the future for what we do now.
i believe safe nuclear plants, augmented by renewables, say, 30-40 percent, is the future. trouble is, the big boys dont make money off the sun or wind etc so they will fight tooth and nail to keep themselves in the green stuff. how hard the rest of us fight will determine the uptake.
i have ede, dye, arw, and slx. once power becomes more expensive, as t flannery was saying the other night, renew's are competitive. we western consumers are obliged to pay more for power, after all, only the very selfish would deny we are part of the problem. if my dog shiits in the park, i clean it up.
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
Wave generators basically how they work.
Oscillating Water Column

The Oscillating Water Column (OWC) generates electricity in a two step process. As a wave enters the column, it forces the air in the column past a turbine and increases the pressure within the column. As the wave retreats, the air is drawn back past the turbine due to the reduced air pressure on the ocean side of the turbine (see Figures 1a and 1b). Irrespective of the airflow direction, the turbine (referred to as a Wells turbine, after its inventor) turns in the same direction and drives a generator to produce electricity.
 

Attachments

Joined
May 6, 2007
Posts
197
Reactions
0
not a big fan of these things. im assuming its the energtech design. they look like a mutant hermit crab... too ugly and intrusive. if they move them further out its only further to transmit the energy. ceto looks interesting though. (i dont have shares in energtech or carnegie)
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Posts
11,227
Reactions
6,420
not a big fan of these things. im assuming its the energtech design. they look like a mutant hermit crab... too ugly and intrusive. if they move them further out its only further to transmit the energy. ceto looks interesting though. (i dont have shares in energtech or carnegie)
Aesthetics versus sustainability. The exact same argument often used against practically all renewable energy sources, especially wind, hydro and solar which account for virtually all non-firewood renewble energy use in developed countries.
 
Joined
May 27, 2007
Posts
210
Reactions
0
Wave generators basically how they work.
Oscillating Water Column

The Oscillating Water Column (OWC) generates electricity in a two step process. As a wave enters the column, it forces the air in the column past a turbine and increases the pressure within the column. As the wave retreats, the air is drawn back past the turbine due to the reduced air pressure on the ocean side of the turbine (see Figures 1a and 1b). Irrespective of the airflow direction, the turbine (referred to as a Wells turbine, after its inventor) turns in the same direction and drives a generator to produce electricity.
They are testing this system in the US to power up desal plants, as they use alot of electricity, nearly more than a aluminium refinary plant.
Linc energy, Arrow energy, etc are the companies that will do well in this climate change era as big mining companies look to reduce CO2.
To fix alot of the CO2 problem, CARS!
It will take a long time to fix this problem, affects too many people. Black gold to important!
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
Even the small players get kicked in the teeth its sad to see that many that want to make a difference cant get past the red tape :banghead: If i looked next door and saw a wind turbine spinning, knowing it was making clean green power i'd sit back and go F#%K yeah look a that, i gotta get one, who cares about aesthetics when we know if we don't start now there wont be anything to look at years down the track anyhow. SAD SAD SAD :mad:

An orange flag marks where Gary Lisle planned to put up a 33-foot windmill behind his house. But that's about as far as his green idea got in this Dallas suburb.

Denied a building permit in March, Lisle joined the growing ranks of frustrated homeowners across the U.S. whose hopes of harvesting wind energy in their backyards have been dashed.

Standoffs between cities and green-minded homeowners are becoming more common as interest grows in residential turbines. Backyard windmills are already an $18 million-a-year industry in the U.S., and manufacturers think that could triple if wind got the same local acceptance and federal incentives as solar energy systems, which typically involve nothing more intrusive than panels on the roof.
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=3213383
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
not a big fan of these things. im assuming its the energtech design. they look like a mutant hermit crab... too ugly and intrusive. if they move them further out its only further to transmit the energy. ceto looks interesting though. (i dont have shares in energtech or carnegie)
I am a fan of anything that produces no emissions regardless of what it looks like, or if it intrudes on peoples million dollar views, Below is a link to a video the ceto model, must admit it is less intrusive. Carnegie corp, asx: CNM

http://www.abc.net.au/tv/australiawide/video/default.htm?program=austwide&pres=20070518_1510&story=1
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
WAVE ENERGY Check this little monster out

A company called Ocean Power Delivery are developing a method of offshore wave energy collection, using a floating tube called "Pelamis".

This long, hinged tube (about the size of 5 railway carriages) bobs up and down in the waves, as the hinges bend they pump hydraulic fluid which drives generators. Three Pelamis wave energy converters will be installed off the coast of Portugal in the first ever commercial application of wave power. Another 30 units could be installed by the end of next year
 

Attachments

Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
Last Update: Monday, May 7, 2007. 11:37am (AEST)
Lake Cargelligo chosen as solar energy project trial site

Lake Cargelligo, in central western New South Wales, has been chosen as a trial site to demonstrate more efficient ways of storing solar energy.

Lloyd Energy Systems has received $5 million in federal funding to install solar energy storage systems.

The company will install a high concentration solar tower at its factory in Cooma, and a 16 tower solar array at Lake Cargelligo.

Each solar array will include mirror panels which track and direct sunlight into a 10 tonne graphite block.

It will absorb the heat which can then drive a three megawatt steam turbine to generate electricity.

It is hoped the project will show that high levels of solar thermal energy can be delivered on demand with low storage losses.

The Commonwealth has awarded almost $18 million funding to five projects under its Advanced Electricity Storage Technologies program.
The heat storage technology accepts heat in any form as it stores it in high purity graphite. Due to the unique properties of high purity graphite, the heat when stored remains available for use for many days/weeks depending on the rate of energy extraction to the rate of energy replacement.

The storage blocks can accept energy from the grid, wind, wave or thermal systems and convert this electrical energy to heat energy to heat up the block.

The block once heated can then transfer the heat energy to a conventional steam raising system by the embedded heat exchangers. The direct contact method of heat transfer employed is very effective giving rise to one of the most efficient steam raises yet designed.

The steam energy can be used on its own as a boiler replacement or used in conjunction with conventional steam turbines and generators, to produce electricity. This electricity can be either consumed locally or sent to the grid.
 

Attachments

chops_a_must

Printing My Own Money
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Posts
4,636
Reactions
0
Thought plugging this was appropriate, seeing as it invloves my department at UNI. :D

Uni sets up alternative fuel research centre

Tuesday, 29 May 2007

A NEW research centre is being established at Murdoch University in Western Australia to accelerate the development of alternative transport fuels and technologies.

The Centre for Research into Energy for Sustainable Transport (CREST) has received a $2.3 million state government grant to provide WA-specific research, education, testing and commercialisation services over the next five years.

CREST director David Harries said the centre would encourage more alternative fuel production companies to set up shop in WA.

"Increasing the production of alternative fuels in the state – especially fuels produced from local feedstock such as biodiesel and ethanol – will reduce the state's future need to rely on imported oil," he said.

The centre is expected to have an operating budget of more than $15 million over five years, bringing together the state's leading researchers in transport fuels and technologies.

CREST's partners will include the Planning and Transport Research Centre, the Department of Planning and Infrastructure, CSIRO and key energy industry members.

CREST is set to begin operating later this year, based at the university's Research Institute for Sustainable Energies.

Curtin University will partner with Murdoch to provide major support and expertise for the project.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2007
Posts
3
Reactions
0
You certainly seem to have a lot of information there. Something you did not show or talk about. Solar thermal power using cheap flat mirrors and associated storage by splitting ammonia and recombining it to produce the heat during night and cloudy weather. This method enables base power, medium, or peak on demand. Unfortunately our scientists have had to go to the States to get funding for this in venture capital. A giga watt plant is being built using this method. When we in Australia have so much renewable energy potential e.g. an area 50x50km somewhere in the desert can supply all of Australia’s energy requirements including the production of hydrogen for motor vehicles and it can be done right now as it is based on mature available technology and will produce no CO2 and the energy is available forever without having to did it up transport or refine it (as in the case of uranium) and is not a terrorist threat why are we trying to go down the nuclear path? Are we all mad? Why do we not invest in it? I can see no safe way we will be able to run the nuclear industry as we live in a world that is entrenched in crazy ideologies. Those who invest in renewables and get in on the ground floor now will be very rich indeed as renewables will be the only way to go. And by the way; where did this fictitious figure of $40/ton of CO2 carbon trading come from for renewables to be come competitive? Solar thermal is set to be the cheapest power source yet available as it is already nearing the price of coal power in the USA and will soon beat it. Further info on solar thermal power can be seen at www.trec.net.au and http://www.trec-uk.org.uk
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Posts
11,227
Reactions
6,420
When we in Australia have so much renewable energy potential e.g. an area 50x50km somewhere in the desert can supply all of Australia’s energy requirements including the production of hydrogen for motor vehicles and it can be done right now as it is based on mature available technology and will produce no CO2 and the energy is available forever
No CO2? What about the huge amounts of fossil fuels needed to build it? We're talking about lots of energy intensive materials here, the production of which will release CO2. That's not an argument against the idea since overall it would be low enough not to matter (as with wind, geothermal and most hydro), but I think "less" would be a better description than "no".

Even a wind turbine emits CO2 in its manufacture (though it only comes to 20 - 30 kg/MWh versus 800+ from coal). Solar photovoltaic (not solar thermal) isn't a great deal better than CCGT when all things are considered due to the energy used in manufacture. Nuclear emits quite a bit of CO2 for much the same reasons.
I can see no safe way we will be able to run the nuclear industry as we live in a world that is entrenched in crazy ideologies.
Totally agreed there.

Natural gas is a lot more risky in this regard than many realise too both in a physical danger sense and national security implications. LNG is incredibly hazardous stuff if the tank ruptures or is attacked in some way. Likewise it is incredibly easy to disrupt the supply of gas if someone wants to inflict major economic harm.
Those who invest in renewables and get in on the ground floor now will be very rich indeed as renewables will be the only way to go.
A point noted as early as the 1950's in the context of hydro-electricity in Tasmania. If you have constant inflation (which we do) then at some point the annual revenue exceeds the entire cost of building the scheme in the first place. The only question being when. The same applies to any low maintenance long lasting source of energy.
where did this fictitious figure of $40/ton of CO2 carbon trading come from for renewables to be come competitive? Solar thermal is set to be the cheapest power source yet available as it is already nearing the price of coal power in the USA and will soon beat it.
That is the approximate cost of CO2 emission reduction using wind or other "easy" and "competitive" renewable options. They aren't a long term solution however and the options that would work are by their very nature large, not easy and don't fit well with the almighty god of "competition" (never mind that competition hasn't resulted in the promised improvement in the international competitivness of Australia's power industry - main thing it's done is reduce generation operating efficiency IMO).
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
You certainly seem to have a lot of information there. Something you did not show or talk about. Solar thermal power using cheap flat mirrors and associated storage by splitting ammonia and recombining it to produce the heat during night and cloudy weather. This method enables base power, medium, or peak on demand. Unfortunately our scientists have had to go to the States to get funding for this in venture capital. A giga watt plant is being built using this method. When we in Australia have so much renewable energy potential e.g. an area 50x50km somewhere in the desert can supply all of Australia’s energy requirements including the production of hydrogen for motor vehicles and it can be done right now as it is based on mature available technology and will produce no CO2 and the energy is available forever without having to did it up transport or refine it (as in the case of uranium) and is not a terrorist threat why are we trying to go down the nuclear path? Are we all mad? Why do we not invest in it? I can see no safe way we will be able to run the nuclear industry as we live in a world that is entrenched in crazy ideologies. Those who invest in renewables and get in on the ground floor now will be very rich indeed as renewables will be the only way to go. And by the way; where did this fictitious figure of $40/ton of CO2 carbon trading come from for renewables to be come competitive? Solar thermal is set to be the cheapest power source yet available as it is already nearing the price of coal power in the USA and will soon beat it. Further info on solar thermal power can be seen at www.trec.net.au and http://www.trec-uk.org.uk
What is the name of this cycle, I know of the kalina cycle is this the same as it also uses ammonia and water mix to improve efficiecys in powere consumption in industrys that produce a lot of waste heat. i.e smelters and even geodynamics asx GDY are using a new and improved version of this cycle
which they have patents pending on, Which theyll use to get more power out of the warmer waste water after the initial Geothermal conversion uses the super hot water.
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2006
Posts
704
Reactions
0
SUPER BIKE :eek: heh heh
Li Zhiyuan rides a paddle boat he constructed out of recycled materials including trashed wood, bottles, cans and bicycles on a river in Hefei, east China's Anhui province. Picture: Reuters
 

Attachments

Top