Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

Politics has become a soap opera

Joined
Jul 3, 2009
Posts
15,683
Reactions
6,702
With the advent of social media and 24/7 T.V, politics has become a soap opera.
The media want to cut costs, so they are desperate for headline grabbing news, rather than slow expensive investigative reporting.
The public want fast news clips, so it doesn't interfere with their gaming or social media time.
The politicians are just as bad, with the ridiculous tweeting, rather than getting on with the bloody job.
Why the hell can't politicians just get on with putting the Country first, rather than their personal rating, or facebook likes.
Jeez politics have become a second rate soap opera, it is bloody sad.
The last twelve months have been filled with, SSM, politicians citizenship and now Barnaby Joyce's love life.
When the F@ck will they just get on with running the Country, that would be novel.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-...-as-political-weapons-dimish-them-all/9495030

My rant, I haven't had one for a while.
 
Joined
Aug 3, 2008
Posts
192
Reactions
23
another good analogy might be "pro wrestling". Everyone (or at least some) knows it's fake, but they (or some) keep on watching and voting anyway.

"When the F@ck will they just get on with running the Country?"
they don't, they're there to give the impression they do.
Most are black mailed, bribed or both.
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Love the title of this thread sptrawler. I needed to find an appropriate thread for this interesting article. It is not about micro politics but more a macro political view of where we might be heading socially.

The Slogan that Unleashed this Hell

In 1969, the salad days of New Left activism, a writer named Carol Hanisch penned an essay that the editor called “The Personal Is Political.” She was seeking to explain the ethos of the women’s therapy sessions she was running. The point was not to improve psychological well being. The point was “political therapy;” that is to motivate people to political action. The idea is that one’s own grievances ought to be turned into political action. “There are no personal solutions at this time,” she wrote. “There is only collective action for a collective solution.”

Let’s leave aside the case for or against her brand of politics. The slogan itself was fire. It spread to every cause, every group, every nook and cranny of life. If you experience dissatisfaction in your life, don’t look within for a personal solution; get active, join a collective, and demand a political solution. Think of this as the left-wing application of the Schmittian principle that only through politics do we find meaning (the very opposite point that has become the main theme of Jordan Peterson’s work).

Fifty years later, I’ve been following the meltdown of a number of “social justice” organizations and causes over the past months, as they turn in on themselves, purge themselves of their own self-defined evil and ultimately crumble based on their own inner contradictions. This happened to the Women’s March. It has happened to the US Congress. It has happened to the most well-funded social justice activist organization in the country. It’s happened in Hollywood, which faces the problem that the more it complies with the identitarian code, the less profitable are its films.

There seems to be no end to the feeding frenzy caused by the politicization of every personal tick. A new entrant into the Democratic Party presidential race cannot even give a public speech without spending the week wailing mea maxima culpa for all the ways in which he violated the canon, however inadvertently. There are no penances sufficient to put one back in the good graces of the moral police of the left.

There are other absurdities, such as the candidate Elizabeth Warren’s alarming dalliance with genetic testing to verify family lore that she is part Native American and thus entitled to sympathy as a victim of oppression. The test not only failed to verify her lore; it produced outrage among tribal groups who clarified that their collective identity is cultural and social, not genetic.

When politics becomes so driven by personal identity that candidates imagine that DNA testing can garner them votes, we’ve reached not a moral high but a low that compares with some of the worst political experiments of the past (see Eugenics).

What’s happening here? The attempt to turn every subjectively felt personal issue into a collective cause with a collective action has hatched a brutal form of identity politics that has generated no end to social conflict, with vast carnage along the way. More....

 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
...and then books get banned and challenged if they don't suit a certain social or political agenda. This is a list from the US, sadly I can't find a more recent list, I am sure there are many more additions to this ten year old list.

Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling
2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
11. Fallen Angels, by Walter Dean Myers
12. It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris
13. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
15. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
16. Forever, by Judy Blume
17. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
18. Go Ask Alice, by Anonymous
19. Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
20. King and King, by Linda de Haan
21. To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
22. Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily von Ziegesar
23. The Giver, by Lois Lowry
24. In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak
25. Killing Mr. Griffen, by Lois Duncan
26. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
27. My Brother Sam Is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier
28. Bridge To Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson
29. The Face on the Milk Carton, by Caroline B. Cooney
30. We All Fall Down, by Robert Cormier
31. What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones
32. Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
33. Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson
34. The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things, by Carolyn Mackler
35. Angus, Thongs, and Full Frontal Snogging, by Louise Rennison
36. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
37. It’s So Amazing, by Robie Harris
38. Arming America, by Michael Bellasiles
39. Kaffir Boy, by Mark Mathabane
40. Life is Funny, by E.R. Frank
41. Whale Talk, by Chris Crutcher
42. The Fighting Ground, by Avi
43. Blubber, by Judy Blume
44. Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher
45. Crazy Lady, by Jane Leslie Conly
46. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
47. The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby: The First Graphic Novel by George Beard and Harold Hutchins, the creators of Captain Underpants, by Dav Pilkey
48. Rainbow Boys, by Alex Sanchez
49. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
50. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
51. Daughters of Eve, by Lois Duncan
52. The Great Gilly Hopkins, by Katherine Paterson
53. You Hear Me?, by Betsy Franco
54. The Facts Speak for Themselves, by Brock Cole
55. Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green
56. When Dad Killed Mom, by Julius Lester
57. Blood and Chocolate, by Annette Curtis Klause
58. Fat Kid Rules the World, by K.L. Going
59. Olive’s Ocean, by Kevin Henkes
60. Speak, by Laurie Halse Anderson
61. Draw Me A Star, by Eric Carle
62. The Stupids (series), by Harry Allard
63. The Terrorist, by Caroline B. Cooney
64. Mick Harte Was Here, by Barbara Park
65. The Things They Carried, by Tim O’Brien
66. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred Taylor
67. A Time to Kill, by John Grisham
68. Always Running, by Luis Rodriguez
69. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
70. Harris and Me, by Gary Paulsen
71. Junie B. Jones (series), by Barbara Park
72. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
73. What’s Happening to My Body Book, by Lynda Madaras
74. The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold
75. Anastasia (series), by Lois Lowry
76. A Prayer for Owen Meany, by John Irving
77. Crazy: A Novel, by Benjamin Lebert
78. The Joy of Gay Sex, by Dr. Charles Silverstein
79. The Upstairs Room, by Johanna Reiss
80. A Day No Pigs Would Die, by Robert Newton Peck
81. Black Boy, by Richard Wright
82. Deal With It!, by Esther Drill
83. Detour for Emmy, by Marilyn Reynolds
84. So Far From the Bamboo Grove, by Yoko Watkins
85. Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes, by Chris Crutcher
86. Cut, by Patricia McCormick
87. Tiger Eyes, by Judy Blume
88. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
89. Friday Night Lights, by H.G. Bissenger
90. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle
91. Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George
92. The Boy Who Lost His Face, by Louis Sachar
93. Bumps in the Night, by Harry Allard
94. Goosebumps (series), by R.L. Stine
95. Shade’s Children, by Garth Nix
96. Grendel, by John Gardner
97. The House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende
98. I Saw Esau, by Iona Opte
99. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, by Judy Blume
100. America: A Novel, by E.R. Frank


CENSORED: The Story of Five Banned Books

Banned & Challenged Classics

....and don't think we in Australia are faring much better....

Banned books at ANU Library among others:


List of authors banned in Nazi Germany
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Posts
6,006
Reactions
5,597
Ann,
...and then books get banned and challenged if they don't suit a certain social or political agenda. This is a list from the US, sadly I can't find a more recent list, I am sure there are many more additions to this ten year old list.

Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

1. Harry Potter (series), by J.K. Rowling

2. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
3. The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier
4. And Tango Makes Three, by Justin Richardson/Peter Parnell
5. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck
6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou
7. Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz
8. His Dark Materials (series), by Philip Pullman
9. ttyl; ttfn; l8r g8r (series), by Lauren Myracle
10. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
11. Fallen Angels, by Walter Dean Myers
12. It’s Perfectly Normal, by Robie Harris
13. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
14. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
15. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
16. Forever, by Judy Blume
17. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
18. Go Ask Alice, by Anonymous
19. Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
20. King and King, by Linda de Haan
21. To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
22. Gossip Girl (series), by Cecily von Ziegesar
23. The Giver, by Lois Lowry
24. In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak
25. Killing Mr. Griffen, by Lois Duncan
26. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
27. My Brother Sam Is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier
28. Bridge To Terabithia, by Katherine Paterson
29. The Face on the Milk Carton, by Caroline B. Cooney
30. We All Fall Down, by Robert Cormier
31. What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones
32. Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
33. Snow Falling on Cedars, by David Guterson
34. The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things, by Carolyn Mackler
35. Angus, Thongs, and Full Frontal Snogging, by Louise Rennison
36. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
37. It’s So Amazing, by Robie Harris
38. Arming America, by Michael Bellasiles
39. Kaffir Boy, by Mark Mathabane
40. Life is Funny, by E.R. Frank
41. Whale Talk, by Chris Crutcher
42. The Fighting Ground, by Avi
43. Blubber, by Judy Blume
44. Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher
45. Crazy Lady, by Jane Leslie Conly
46. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
47. The Adventures of Super Diaper Baby: The First Graphic Novel by George Beard and Harold Hutchins, the creators of Captain Underpants, by Dav Pilkey
48. Rainbow Boys, by Alex Sanchez
49. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
50. The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini
51. Daughters of Eve, by Lois Duncan
52. The Great Gilly Hopkins, by Katherine Paterson
53. You Hear Me?, by Betsy Franco
54. The Facts Speak for Themselves, by Brock Cole
55. Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green
56. When Dad Killed Mom, by Julius Lester
57. Blood and Chocolate, by Annette Curtis Klause
58. Fat Kid Rules the World, by K.L. Going
59. Olive’s Ocean, by Kevin Henkes
60. Speak, by Laurie Halse Anderson
61. Draw Me A Star, by Eric Carle
62. The Stupids (series), by Harry Allard
63. The Terrorist, by Caroline B. Cooney
64. Mick Harte Was Here, by Barbara Park
65. The Things They Carried, by Tim O’Brien
66. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, by Mildred Taylor
67. A Time to Kill, by John Grisham
68. Always Running, by Luis Rodriguez
69. Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury
70. Harris and Me, by Gary Paulsen
71. Junie B. Jones (series), by Barbara Park
72. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
73. What’s Happening to My Body Book, by Lynda Madaras
74. The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold
75. Anastasia (series), by Lois Lowry
76. A Prayer for Owen Meany, by John Irving
77. Crazy: A Novel, by Benjamin Lebert
78. The Joy of Gay Sex, by Dr. Charles Silverstein
79. The Upstairs Room, by Johanna Reiss
80. A Day No Pigs Would Die, by Robert Newton Peck
81. Black Boy, by Richard Wright
82. Deal With It!, by Esther Drill
83. Detour for Emmy, by Marilyn Reynolds
84. So Far From the Bamboo Grove, by Yoko Watkins
85. Staying Fat for Sarah Byrnes, by Chris Crutcher
86. Cut, by Patricia McCormick
87. Tiger Eyes, by Judy Blume
88. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood
89. Friday Night Lights, by H.G. Bissenger
90. A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle
91. Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George
92. The Boy Who Lost His Face, by Louis Sachar
93. Bumps in the Night, by Harry Allard
94. Goosebumps (series), by R.L. Stine
95. Shade’s Children, by Garth Nix
96. Grendel, by John Gardner
97. The House of the Spirits, by Isabel Allende
98. I Saw Esau, by Iona Opte
99. Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret, by Judy Blume
100. America: A Novel, by E.R. Frank

CENSORED: The Story of Five Banned Books

Banned & Challenged Classics

....and don't think we in Australia are faring much better....

Banned books at ANU Library among others:


List of authors banned in Nazi Germany
Is that true these bans at ANU, seems incredible?
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Posts
10,071
Reactions
2,726
Ann it would be useful to see the source of your "Banned books".

When I checked out the links it was quite interesting. Certainly worth understanding how peoples concern about poverty, race behaviour has had an impact. To kill a Mockingbird has been banned in many, many places because of it's depiction of the railroading of a negro for an assault he never committed.

By the way those you listed as banned in ACU are not in fact banned there at all.

If you check out the link you will find that they are part of a special showcase on Banned Books week to show people books that have been banned elsewhere in the world. It opens up the conversation about why certain books are banned in different countries.

https://anulib.anu.edu.au/news-events/news/banned-books-anu-library
http://bannedbooksweek.weebly.com/books-banned-globally.html
http://www.dorrancepublishing.com/censored-story-five-banned-books/
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Ann,

Is that true these bans at ANU, seems incredible?
It seems not qldfrog, Bas pointed out if you read the whole article, the headline pronounces "Banned Books at ANU Library", you need to actually read the article as the heading is profoundly misleading...

"Thankfully, in Australia we all have the freedom to read. This is a privilege but also a responsibility – we should read things with an open mind, ask questions, seek answers and allow ourselves to grow.
ANU Library is marking this week by highlighting a number of books in our collection that have been banned, or are still banned, around the world."


For the moment we may have these freedoms but it may not last.
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Ann it would be useful to see the source of your "Banned books".
Sorry Bas, I got sidetracked part of the way through while I was writing the post.
Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books: 2000-2009

By the way those you listed as banned in ACU are not in fact banned there at all.
Thanks for pointing this out, it was a very misleading headline from the ANU
"Banned books at ANU Library"

I don't think we will be immune from censorship for much longer once we have a centralized world government in charge.
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
These days politics is about pandering to public opinion, not what is true or for the best interests of the country. In the years past, good countries had a good public service with vast experience of the ways of the world and were able to steer the politicians into certain steady directions which were best for the country and the people. In their wisdom or lack of it, political parties decimated the old guard public servants and brought in their own sycophants to advise them. Now interest groups with the loudest voices are the ones that sway governments and government policy.
Recently we have had a massive upheaval of children taking to the streets to protest and demand the government fix climate change. Why were the streets filled with children and not adults? Kids are more gullible than most adults. The problem comes when the political agenda of the day is influenced by manipulated children.

So who is doing the manipulating one might ask? Well surely it is the teachers. So who is manipulating the teachers? Teachers are people who value learning and a good teacher will remain a student for life. Where were the classic places to sit and learn? The libraries were full of reference books filled with historical knowledge. In universities there were educated arguments from all opines on any and all subjects. There was open debate in colleges and universities on a range of subjects of classic or current interest. It left the debate audiences with an opportunity to assess the value of each argument and come to their own conclusions.

There is no debate allowed on climate change as there is the totalitarian view that the science is settled and no further debate will be entertained. Anyone who dares question the authoritarian status quo will be vilified, ostracized and eventually expelled from the group.

How on earth did this profound and dangerous censorship come about one might ask?

Look to your local library, do you see the massive volumes of reference material that used to fill their shelves? No! What you see are a lot more computers and desks with computer connections for your own PC. We are getting our knowledge from the ether from all those who fill it. Well there are not a whole lot that fill the ether, there are basically two main sources for information Google and Facebook. Think for a minute about these two organizations and how they can filter the information they wish to promote. Want to look at some unbiased reference material? You won't find unbiased material on Wikipedia.

We are being force fed an agenda, teachers and academics are not aware of the ability of others to manipulate and fool them as their lives walk different paths from those who have had experience in business and all the bullsh!t that goes with that. That is why Amway targets universities and academic institutions for their 'sales people'. No self-respecting sales person would touch the stuff, they know bullsh!t when they hear it, sadly academics are very gullible and easy targets for manipulation.

This not just about climate change, this is about any and all information being fed to us via the media and online. This is a time when we all need to be extra vigilant and question what we are being told and about why we hold certain opinions ourselves. How did we arrive at those opinions? Was it impossible to find an equal balance of argument on both sides of a subject? Was there a bias? Do you only feel good when your own opinions are substantiated? If you answer yes to the preceding, then you need to question whether you are being manipulated by an agenda.

This is an interesting read, the bold type aside, note the chart feature only takes into account Google and Facebook's % as at 2015, what on earth will it be now? We may have a problem folks! :)

When Are We Going to Tackle the For-Profit Monopolies Which Censored RussiaGate Skeptics?




It appears so much of what we see, hear and believe may be driven entirely by profit. Good news is bad news. Bad news is great, wars, corrupt presidents, crashing stock markets, earth burning to a crisp in twelve years, devastating weather conditions, all great news, don't worry if it is true or not, embellish it and then sell it. The media can always plead they were just reporting the facts as they knew it. In the meantime we are being fed bullsh!t and lies.

 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Then of course we now have the suggestion Google is filtering information to suit their own agenda perhaps? It is something I have noticed about Climate Change/Warming there is virtually no alternate arguments from reputable sources other than the crazies who inhabit the extremes of any debate. I have seen there is no balance whatever in Climate Change facts online it is virtually all propagandized and sensationalized. It makes sensible debate impossible. I am sure that is what any political agenda would want, close down sensible debate, get rid of any opposition to their cause and fill the children, our next generation, with one sided biased information. We may have a problem folks! :)
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Posts
10,071
Reactions
2,726
Then of course we now have the suggestion Google is filtering information to suit their own agenda perhaps? It is something I have noticed about Climate Change/Warming there is virtually no alternate arguments from reputable sources other than the crazies who inhabit the extremes of any debate. I have seen there is no balance whatever in Climate Change facts online it is virtually all propagandized and sensationalized. It makes sensible debate impossible. I am sure that is what any political agenda would want, close down sensible debate, get rid of any opposition to their cause and fill the children, our next generation, with one sided biased information. We may have a problem folks! :)
Ann this is just ridiculous. Climate science is about what is happening to our world as understood by the scientific community and physical observations by meteorologists.

The overwhelming majority of scientists have shown and accepted that our climate is now warming rapidly overwhelmingly as a consequence of human produced greenhouse gases.

The meteorologists and earth scientists can show a million different consequences of this warming. They range from rapidly melting ice caps, rapidly increasing temperatures and weather extremes caused by the changes in climate systems because of climate change. Biologists will point to seismic changes in ecosytems , changes in biodiversity as species die out or move or take over areas.

These are realities Ann. If you want "alternative facts" you need to bring in the Fossil Fuel lobby, The NRA, The tobacco industry, the gambling industry. They will give you whatever alternative facts their

What the scientists are saying and observing is the reality Ann. Sad but true.:(
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Posts
10,071
Reactions
2,726
Ann if you want the facts on Climate Change and how it is affecting our world would you consider listening to the worlds largest re-insurance company ? A hard headed business that deals in the bottom line.

And if you think this is just a blown up story check out their website and see how much analysis they do and the effects these events are having on peoples lives and their business. It's sobering. And insurance companies don't do "alternative facts"

https://www.munichre.com/topics-online/en/climate-change-and-natural-disasters/climate-change.html

Climate change could make insurance too expensive for most people – report
Munich Re, world’s largest reinsurance firm, warns premium rises could become social issue

Arthur Neslen

Thu 21 Mar 2019 13.12 GMT Last modified on Fri 22 Mar 2019 00.45 GMT

Shares
3,678


3000.jpg

An aerial view of a neighbourhood destroyed by the 2018 wildfire in Paradise, California. Photograph: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Insurers have warned that climate change could make cover for ordinary people unaffordable after the world’s largest reinsurance firm blamed global warming for $24bn (£18bn) of losses in the Californian wildfires.

Ernst Rauch, Munich Re’s chief climatologist, told the Guardian that the costs could soon be widely felt, with premium rises already under discussion with clients holding asset concentrations in vulnerable parts of the state.

“If the risk from wildfires, flooding, storms or hail is increasing then the only sustainable option we have is to adjust our risk prices accordingly. In the long run it might become a social issue,” he said after Munich Re published a report into climate change’s impact on wildfires. “Affordability is so critical [because] some people on low and average incomes in some regions will no longer be able to buy insurance.”

https://www.theguardian.com/environ...ance-too-expensive-for-ordinary-people-report
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Munich Re, world’s largest reinsurance firm, warns premium rises could become social issue
A great excuse to raise premiums, who will doubt them after all everyone knows Climate Change is about to devastate the whole world and we will all be cinders in 12 years!

An aerial view of a neighbourhood destroyed by the 2018 wildfire in Paradise, California. Photograph: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Insurers have warned that climate change could make cover for ordinary people unaffordable after the world’s largest reinsurance firm blamed global warming for $24bn (£18bn) of losses in the Californian wildfires.
Nothing to do with Climate Change but let's not ruin a good story with all the facts.
......Despite years of fuel reduction funded by special fees, numerous wildfires ravaged wildland-urban communities. Investigations found that PG&E powerline failures during high winds caused many of the fires. Utilities have the power to disable power lines, and PG&E shut off power following the 2018 North Bay fires.[33] A policy it adopted subsequent to the North Bay fires precluded shutting off lines carrying more than 115kV because of the number of customers this shutdown had negatively impacted.[33]
Reference.
 
Joined
Jun 30, 2008
Posts
10,071
Reactions
2,726
Ann you are way off beam.

Why did Munich Re blame global warming for the Camp Fire disaster ? It wasn't because CC "started " the fire. Some other factor starts fires. What Climate Change has done has created an environment that is hotter and drier than ever and enabled fires to become firestorms vastly increasing their spread and intensity Incidentally that is what has happened in Australia as well and has caused our fire fighters to review their strategies and insist people leave rather than try and fight uncontrollable fires. And you can see these effects in the huge Canadian fires as well as the ones in Europe

Munich Re details the mounting costs of natural disasters and notes how these have been exacerbated by the extreme weather conditions. These are not excuses to raise premiums. They are facts on the table. :(
 

Ann

Joined
Dec 24, 2005
Posts
2,093
Reactions
1,042
Munich Re details the mounting costs of natural disasters and notes how these have been exacerbated by the extreme weather conditions. These are not excuses to raise premiums. They are facts on the table. :(
...as more people build more homes in high fuel areas the costs to insurance companies will rise. In earlier days there was less building density in high fuel areas so the fires caused less damage to property and there were fewer claims. Fires just burnt themselves out. It is poor planning and a greater spread of power lines into high fuel areas which will ultimately cause a rise in premiums. High temperatures and wildfires will always happen, don't build in the middle of it and expect to be safe!
 

Similar threads

Top