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News pronunciations - where's the consistency?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tothemax6, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. tothemax6

    tothemax6

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    Hi All,

    Just thought I'd raise this, since it really bugs me and I fancy sharing this fact :D.
    It seems that is an inconsistency in news reporting where names are pronounced either anglicized or natively. For example Bahrain - half the time they pronounce it "Bax rain" (x representing a guttural g consonant) and half the time they pronounce it in English - "bar rain". My opinion is that only the anglicized version should be used, and throwing in a native pronunciation of a foreign word in the middle of an English sentence is just code-switching for the sake of sounding clever.
    No one, for instance, pronounces "Vincent van Gogh" natively ("finchent fan xox"). Its normally Vincent van 'Goff' or 'Goe'. And no one correctly pronounced Fukushima during the tsunami news ("Fuk-oo-shii-ma" instead of the native "Fukushima".

    So what does the forum think? Should news shows use anglicized versions of foreign names, teach their anchors how to natively pronounce all foreign names involved in the stories, or not worry about consistency?
     
  2. Slipperz

    Slipperz

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    I just watched the SBS dateline report from Bahrain. The harsh reality of Bahrani life was in stark contrast from 60 minutes hard hitting report on a bloke that got nearly taken by a croc, a teenage pop star and teenage pregnancy.

    60 minutes gets closer to the tabloids every week. :p:
     
  3. tothemax6

    tothemax6

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    Um, is that related to pronunciations somehow? :confused:
     
  4. Slipperz

    Slipperz

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    No just threw my 2 cents in there. Sorry to go off topic a bit on you :)
     
  5. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    Um, Slipperz, 60 minutes IS a tabloid, and one of the worst order.

    It's an interesting point. As a New Zealander, all my life there we pronounced Maori names in an Anglicized way. Even the Maori themselves.
    Then around 1980 or so, some left leaning character decided we were denigrating the Maori by not pronouncing all these complicated place names with the original Maori pronunciations/inflections.

    Thereafter there ensued the most godawful mishmash of ill conceived pronunciations ever heard as many proceeded to be politically correct.

    My own view is that we should adopt in this country the pronunciation that is most understandable by the majority, so do not need to get all warm and fuzzy about thinking we are much better people if we include that ugly gutteral sound in the pronunciation of "Bahrain".
     
  6. wayneL

    wayneL Rotaredom

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    Yeah what is it with that?

    The weird thing is that I've heard about 4 different pronunciations of the word "Maori" itself. Words like Paraparaumu I've heard pronounced three different ways in the same sentence!

    And as some character remarked the other day, news readers will take great care with the Maori (and other foreign) pronunciations, yet are sloppy with English language place names like N' Zullun.

    My pet gripe is using foreign language titles like "Herr" Niggli, "Monsieur" Mitterand and Watanabe "San" when speaking in English.

    Excuse me? Our title is "Mister" and confers respect in English. These other title denigrate our language when speaking in English IMO.

    When I was in Germany, I was never referred to as "Mister" wayneL, always "Herr" wayneL as is correct in their language.

    When speaking English, its the Anglicized version for me.

    We Don't refer to Deutchland, Espana, Schweiz and Nippon; it's Germany, Spain, Switzerland and Japan.

    Ridiculous!

    :2twocents
     
  7. tothemax6

    tothemax6

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    Amen
     
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