• Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

Hello and welcome to Aussie Stock Forums!

To gain full access you must register. Registration is free and takes only a few seconds to complete.

Already a member? Log in here.

Investment implications of Climate Change

Discussion in 'Business, Investment and Economics' started by SirRumpole, Sep 17, 2019.

sentifi.com

Aussie Stock Forum Sentifi Top themes and market attention on:

  1. sptrawler

    sptrawler

    Posts:
    11,954
    Likes Received:
    2,586
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    I've still got a Panasonic 50" plasma in the holiday unit, takes two to carry it, so if someone wants to steal it they deserve it. :roflmao:
    The picture did go all red a few years ago, so I took the back off cleaned it out, disconnected all the board connector and cleaned them that was about 5 years ago.:xyxthumbs
    When it dies, I will go upto Aldi 65" $699, can't complain at that.
     
    Jack Aubrey likes this.
  2. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    Seems Labor has worked out that renewables may be an opportunity for Australia (der)

    Anthony Albanese today highlighted

    "..... potential export opportunities of lithium, rare earths, iron and titanium as the “key ingredients” of the renewables revolution, saying the minerals would be in high demand in a low-carbon future."

    How iron got a mention and not nickel seems a bit odd to me, but at least they aren't just talking about coal.

    Apparently. he also talked about fast recharge technology and I've seen tweets from some Labor members highlighting hydrogen tech as part of the mix.

    The speech also had a bit to say about education, training and immigration (work visas).

    Thankfully, this wasn't an election speech. Otherwise the Government would feel compelled to oppose everything in it and scare the tradies. Of course they might do that anyway but, hopefully, they will realise that we are not all Quiet (or near dead) Australians and have a stake in the future direction (and diversity) of the economy.
     
  3. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

    Posts:
    12,838
    Likes Received:
    2,383
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Yes , good to see Labor hitting the gov't where it hurts, their lack of vision and "nation building" policies.

    Three years seems a long time, but with only a one seat majority, all it takes is a couple of heart attacks or the need to spend time with family in marginal seats and there could be a change of government.
    :D
     
    Jack Aubrey likes this.
  4. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    Maybe we've got this energy thing all wrong. While we are chasing new and sophisticated forms of power, we have been ignoring the perpetual motion machines all around us.

     
    SirRumpole and qldfrog like this.
  5. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
  6. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
  7. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

    Posts:
    12,838
    Likes Received:
    2,383
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Jack Aubrey likes this.
  8. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    Strange - I got it OK and I have not given a Murdoch company any money for at least 10 years!
     
  9. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

    Posts:
    12,838
    Likes Received:
    2,383
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Can you copy it to here or give a summary ?
     
  10. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    Went back and I'm blocked! Damn those Murdochs!

    Anyway, Kohler argues that energy and transport sector emission reductions are already on-track to very low levels by 2050 due to new technologies and markets. Steel-making and concrete emissions however make up 10% of national (and global) emissions and are much harder to reduce. He says that Hydrogen is a promising reducing agent in steel fabrication (Thyssenkrupp has a pilot plant). There are no known ways to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in cement production but alternatives to cement are being researched. Kohler thinks this would be good area for Australia (CSIRO) to lead on, with substantial downstream industry payoffs.

    Being in the Australian, the comments section of the article is full of denier BS, predictions of economic doom if Australia was to do anything, and the usual conspiracy theories, but the article itself seems quite positive and well-reasoned.
     
    SirRumpole likes this.
  11. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

    Posts:
    12,838
    Likes Received:
    2,383
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2014
    Thanks for that.

    Alan Kohler always seems to have a lot of commonsense and business nous, it will be interesting to hear what he has to say on 7:30 this week.
     
  12. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
  13. qldfrog

    qldfrog

    Posts:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    I do not really know why, I can not believe in hydrogen, maybe because it is too similar to the current oil scheme: big manufacturing/distribution networks, centralised vs electricity which can be pretty self sufficient now with solar/batteries.I was also maybe tainted by my chemistry lessons where hydrogen was seen as a nasty gas always ready to escape, destroying metal containers and with somewhat less intrinsic energy than other hydrocarbons..from memory, do not trust me on that one
    But if it can work, like the beauty of water as exhaust
    why not just use hydrogen cells as battery? in a cycle..I am sure chemists are working hard to achieve that if they can..
     
    Jack Aubrey likes this.
  14. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    I certainly see your point about centralised/corporate control of the supply chain. It really does seem too neat that companies controlling one resources (oil and gas) could easily slip into controlling another and continue happily on their market-manipulating way. Strangely perhaps (as I am now a card carrying inner-city elitist/leftist/greenie) I think it is a good thing that current "bad" companies transform themselves. I also think it is good that there are many options being pursued in the market, including nuclear, stored hydro, different battery technologies and hydrogen. Even carbon capture storage gets a tick from me.

    From an investment point of view, it is REALLY HARD to see where this might go - but that's what makes it an interesting discussion. Government policy (and lack of policy) makes it even harder.
     
    SirRumpole and qldfrog like this.
  15. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    This is interesting and relevant in its own right but also contains a summary of where the other major banks (apart from Westpac, which is busy with Other Things right now) are at with their fossil fuel risk assessments.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12...oal-projects-leaked-document-reveals/11764898

    I am sure this will provoke even more tsk tsking from the Commonwealth Government.

    After the smoke has settled from the current fires and drought (sorry), I am pretty sure we'll see some risk re-rating of agriculture in more marginal areas too.

    The other big news this week about the Russia-China gas pipeline will also, IMO, eventually have a huge impact on Australia's coal and gas sectors.

    (Disclaimer: I hold a small parcel of ASX:EXR which is exploring for gas in Mongolia with the aim of supplying the domestic market there and also piping gas to China as a replacement for coal in energy production)
     
    qldfrog likes this.
  16. qldfrog

    qldfrog

    Posts:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    For what it is worth, while in China, it was clear Russia was building up as their new resource partner, and with Russia lead, the resources mines and fields are not sold to China company, just using them as customers.win win
    With CC, vast areas of resources are opening in the North and both Russia and China are leveraging these to deliver cleaner resources..no one there cares about co2 but they care about the smog and air pollution, and the new gas and oil fields of Siberia
    are the key.
     
    Jack Aubrey likes this.
  17. Knobby22

    Knobby22 Mmmmmm 2nd breakfast

    Posts:
    5,417
    Likes Received:
    662
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Also eventually Antarctica will open up.
    The question was asked what minerals would be expected there. The answer was look to Australia. They are geologically similar.
    You can see why the Chinese are setting up so many bases (5) in the Australian Antarctic Territory which they don't recognise. Australia only has 3. They are always thinking long term.
     
    qldfrog likes this.
  18. Jack Aubrey

    Jack Aubrey Very inexperienced trader

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    196
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2019
    Coal exit policies have now been announced by 17 of the world’s biggest insurers

    As we have discussed before, this is fast becoming a stranded assets issue - a game of pass the parcel where small investors and taxpayers are targeted as the "bigger fools". I am confident that Ms Rinehart and Mr Adani will not be picking up the tab for their failed investments.

    Knobby22 said:
    Also eventually Antarctica will open up.
    The question was asked what minerals would be expected there. The answer was look to Australia. They are geologically similar.
    You can see why the Chinese are setting up so many bases (5) in the Australian Antarctic Territory which they don't recognise. Australia only has 3. They are always thinking long term.


    I really hope that is a VERY long term prospect. I worked for the Australian Antarctic Division many years ago and the risks of even normal materials handling and personnel safety there are enormous.

    But I do agree that we underestimate the Chinese capacity for long term strategy.
     
    qldfrog likes this.
  19. qldfrog

    qldfrog

    Posts:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    1,352
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2008
    I do not underestimate them or the Russians as they both work for what they see is the best interest of their country, a bit like the US used to up to the 60ies
     
Loading...

Share This Page