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Investment implications of Climate Change

Jack Aubrey

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Rising sea levels and 20 story beach side apartments. A match made in purgatory and then hell.

The collapse of the Champlain Towers condo in Florida a few weeks ago has focused attention on the immediate reality of rising sea levels. The move is on and once fashionable condos are being deserted and the new investment focus is surprise, surprise, buying up inland properties that are currently poor, cheap and have 10 feet more elevation than coast side condos.

I'm not sure how orderly this movement will be and how the old condos will actually be sold or insurable in a few years

Excellent in depth story.

As an interesting (possibly) aside, I did a desktop study a few years ago on what impact a 1 metre sea level rise would have on the area of the southern NSW coast around Tuross Lake (I was interested in buying into the area). It is not (yet) an area where there are many multi-storey buildings at all. While only a handful of properties would suffer permanent inundation, many more would have been critically affected by storm surge. The big issue however was infrastructure. Access roads would be cut at several points, leaving the whole settlement as a "stranded asset". I doubt the area would generate enough in rates and taxes to cover the cost of substantial new roads and bridges - which would be true of many areas directly affected by even a modest sea-level rise.

A similar exercise is possible with maps already supplied by the planners for Brisbane using the past few major levels as a guide. Many street in many low-lying suburbs would be toast (soggy toast, anyway).
 
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As an interesting (possibly) aside, I did a desktop study a few years ago on what impact a 1 metre sea level rise would have on the area of the southern NSW coast around Tuross Lake (I was interested in buying into the area). It is not (yet) an area where there are many multi-storey buildings at all. While only a handful of properties would suffer permanent inundation, many more would have been critically affected by storm surge. The big issue however was infrastructure. Access roads would be cut at several points, leaving the whole settlement as a "stranded asset". I doubt the area would generate enough in rates and taxes to cover the cost of substantial new roads and bridges - which would be true of many areas directly affected by even a modest sea-level rise.

A similar exercise is possible with maps already supplied by the planners for Brisbane using the past few major levels as a guide. Many street in many low-lying suburbs would be toast (soggy toast, anyway).

Absolutely. I don't lay awake at night thinking about the "stranded assets " issue of rising sea levels any more. Frankly it's too ugly. But realistically, not thinking about it won't make it go away.

As you note Jack, storm surge will affect properties and their economic viability way before inundation. The collapse of critical infrastructure in low lying areas will impact the liveability of whole cities.

For example I have not yet heard of a realistic solution to the effects of rising sea levels on sewage plants which by definition are at sea level. There are plenty of papers that identify and research the issue. But realistic solutions ? Particularly when sea levels will continue to rise ?

 
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MIning Industry getting creative.

They are trying to work out how t electrify their mining processes. So any budding/experienced engineers out there - Hop to it.!

 
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Came across an analysis of how we can move very swiftly to 90% reduction of carbon emissions world wide by 2035. o_O
What is fascinating from an investment POV is the way we can achieve this goal through technology that is already available. The story outlines the new investment areas that will be critical in this move.

Also saw a recent presentation from Elon Musk on CC. Doesn't pull any punches. Obviously he is intent on being a key mover in electrification and developing renewable energy .

 
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Part of the critical conversations about moving Australia rapidly to a post carbon future is
1) How will all the pieces fit together ?
2) Where will our future jobs come from ?
3) What are the new investment opportunities we need to pursue ?

In outback Queensland there is a renewable energy hub being developed which addresses these issues. Really excellent analysis of the land, energy,conservation and farming issues we need to address and how this project can create a powerful synergy.

Should be well appreciated by National farmer networks looking to keep their busineses thriving.

 
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This is a fascinating story. Essentially details a Swedish city that is largely built using plywood. The focus is a 20 Story skyscraper built from wood.

The engineering details are impressive. It is also a highly practical build that seems well sorted techniclaly and very caapble of being easily replicated.

Isn’t it good, Swedish plywood: the miraculous eco-town with a 20-storey wooden skyscraper

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Stronger than steel … the Sara Cultural Centre topped with the Wood Hotel. Photograph: Jonas Westling
Skellefteå has wooden schools, bridges, even car parks. And now it has one of the world’s tallest wooden buildings. We visit Sweden to see what a climate-conscious future looks like

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Oliver Wainwright

@ollywainwright
Thu 14 Oct 2021 16.00 AEDT
https://www.theguardian.com/artandd...rey-wooden-skyscraper-worlds-tallest#comments
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As you come in to land at Skellefteå airport in the far north of Sweden, you are greeted by a wooden air traffic control tower poking up from an endless forest of pine and spruce. After boarding a biogas bus into town, you glide past wooden apartment blocks and wooden schools, cross a wooden road bridge and pass a wooden multistorey car park, before finally reaching the centre, now home to one of the tallest new wooden buildings in the world.
“We are not the wood Taliban,” says Bo Wikström, from Skellefteå’s tourism agency, as he leads a group of visitors on a “wood safari” of its buildings. “Other materials are allowed.” But why build in anything else – when you’re surrounded by 480,000 hectares of forest?

 

Knobby22

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The EU has decided to forge ahead with border carbon tarriffs - easy to see who they are thinking of targeting.
Dan Tehan is aggressively warning the NATs that we will be in trouble if they don't step up.

Could this result in the fall of the $A?
 
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Twiggy Forrest isn't the only business tycoon pushing rapid de carbonisation industries.

Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes sells economic benefits of green investment with $1.5b pledge

ABC Illawarra
/ By Justin Huntsdale
Posted 3h ago3 hours ago
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Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes will spread his investment across a number of industries.(Reuters: Daniel Munoz)
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From his home in the New South Wales Southern Highlands, Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes has his eyes firmly focused on the future of regional Australia.

Key points:​

  • Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes and his wife will invest $1.5b in an effort to help fight climate change
  • He says regional areas stand to benefit greatly from green investments that will create jobs and boost the economy
  • Mr Cannon-Brookes says private industry and individuals need to share the responsibility with the government

The chief executive of the technology giant not only sees enormous potential of environmental investments — he thinks he knows the best way to sell them.
"The decarbonisation of the planet is the biggest economic opportunity for Australia over the next 20 years," he told ABC Radio Sydney's Breakfast program.
"Things like the creation of jobs, improvement in the standard of living and growth of our economy — but we have to make changes to take advantage of that, otherwise it will be taken advantage of by other nations and economies.

 
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