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Ethnic names struggle in job search

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Ethnic names' struggle in job search


Or Yes, we are Racist, now bugger off Sol :eek:



New research by the Australian National University shows job applicants with 'ethnic' names find it tougher to get an interview than those with Anglo-Saxon names.

Economists at the university, Professors Alison Booth and Andrew Leigh, disseminated 4000 fake CVs to job advertisers in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney to test the level of discrimination.

Researchers found that applicants with Chinese names were more likely to be knocked back than applicants with Anglo-Saxon names.

Job seekers with Italian, Middle Eastern and Indigenous names also had a lower chance of being called in for an interview.

All the fake CVs, regardless of the ethnicity of the names, stated the applicant had studied in Australia.

"By varying the names on the CVs, we were able to estimate precisely the extent of hiring discrimination," Professor Booth says.

"Because all other characteristics are held constant, we can be sure that we are actually measuring discrimination."

Professor Leigh says minorities would fare better in the labour market if they Anglicised their names.

"It certainly suggests Anglicising your name increases the chance of getting a job interview," Prof Leigh told reporters in Canberra.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Ethnic names' struggle in job search


Or Yes, we are Racist, now bugger off Sol :eek:



New research by the Australian National University shows job applicants with 'ethnic' names find it tougher to get an interview than those with Anglo-Saxon names.

Economists at the university, Professors Alison Booth and Andrew Leigh, disseminated 4000 fake CVs to job advertisers in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney to test the level of discrimination.

Researchers found that applicants with Chinese names were more likely to be knocked back than applicants with Anglo-Saxon names.

Job seekers with Italian, Middle Eastern and Indigenous names also had a lower chance of being called in for an interview.

All the fake CVs, regardless of the ethnicity of the names, stated the applicant had studied in Australia.

"By varying the names on the CVs, we were able to estimate precisely the extent of hiring discrimination," Professor Booth says.

"Because all other characteristics are held constant, we can be sure that we are actually measuring discrimination."

Professor Leigh says minorities would fare better in the labour market if they Anglicised their names.

"It certainly suggests Anglicising your name increases the chance of getting a job interview," Prof Leigh told reporters in Canberra.
Well Duh.

Of course I am not going to get any jobs in chinatown, nor "family businesses". We are all guilty of this, PLEASE do not let journalists like this feed the media and do-gooders so that there is imbalances going back the other way too..... a bit like how the women's movement has started to get out of control ( maternity leave, devaluing mothers who stay at home and raise children, equal pay requests for less work etc )

PS - my business had approximately 20% ethnic staff, and the problem isn't that I am racist ( far from, I am very open minded ) It is the CUSTOMERS who are, and businesses need customers to survive.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

I believe many European immigrants anglicised their names when they came to Australia from Poland, Italy, Holland, Germany, Greece etc... circa 1950's
 

Julia

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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

It is the CUSTOMERS who are, and businesses need customers to survive.
In the account I heard of this study on ABC Radio, this point was clearly made.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

In the account I heard of this study on ABC Radio, this point was clearly made.
That's good, so I hope that helps moderate people's beliefs that Australians are more racist than they actually are.

It would be like opening up a shop in chinatown fully staffed by caucasians... not going to work. Racist? not sure. I can understand the business owner only employing asians.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

well the customers dont know their names..

Its appearance then...

Aussies just shorten names anyways..
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

i agree.

as a customer i cant stand it if a west african or indian is not driving a cab i use in melbourne..

and what is forgotten is that these corporations are also employing thousands of ethnics in their call centres, so to stack the ethnic numbers higher and have more new imigrants or chinese names on their payrolls is very hard for them to justify, a balance that is obviously needed in favor of anglo ethnic employees also, and it is not unethical i assume to employ one..

customers are always right.. its all about what the customers wants..
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

It makes sense. Employers have a better chance to get someone who can speak English (if not read and write it) by avoiding ethnic names. We would have the same problem in a non-English speaking country.

However employers should, at least, interview these people. They might be surprised at how many ethnics are more proficient in the three Rs than those of us who know no other language.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

i agree.

as a customer i cant stand it if a west african or indian is not driving a cab i use in melbourne..

and what is forgotten is that these corporations are also employing thousands of ethnics in their call centres, so to stack the ethnic numbers higher and have more new imigrants or chinese names on their payrolls is very hard for them to justify, a balance that is obviously needed in favor of anglo ethnic employees also, and it is not unethical i assume to employ one..

customers are always right.. its all about what the customers wants..
btw i am being sarcastic here

its really a shame the ability for this silent racism to remain

canada has the same issues..

Canadians with Asian names face a daunting level of hidden discrimination when searching for a job, University of B.C. economics professor Paul Oreopoulos has found.

“In some cases, applicants are being turned down for an interview because of their name, even if they are the better hire,” he said.

Oreopoulos sent out 6,699 fake resumes to Toronto-area employers in 2008, changing up the applicant’s name, educational background and country of work experience.

Even when applicants had identical Canadian work experiences and educational backgrounds, every 100 resumes with English names resulted in roughly 16 calls from employers. For every 100 resumes with Asian names, only 11 generated calls from employers. That means a resume with an English name was 40-per-cent more likely to generate a call back.

“In cases where the employer requires the hire to be very good at English, then consciously or unconsciously, they may have a concern when looking at their resume,” said Oreopoulos. “The other possibility is preference-based discrimination: the employer, consciously or unconsciously, prefers to have applicants of the same ethnicity working for them.”

Oreopoulos said both explanations are likely factors.

“There is definitely an amount of unfairness, no matter what’s underlying this result,” he said.

“I’m not surprised one bit,” said Terry Johal, president of the Indo-Canadian Business Association of B.C.

“I guarantee you discrimination is there. We all know it’s there, but how do you recognize it?”

Johal said some Indo-Canadians ”” himself included ”” adopt an English name to make communication easier. But he cautioned that anglicizing foreign names will not solve the problem.

“If you change your name and send a fake resume, at the end of the day you”ve got to go for an interview,” he said.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Yep Calliope I agree

English is a universal language - they learn english, plus their own countries

Also, coz they live so close to other countries, spend alot of holiday time there, they learn that as well..
By the end, they know about 5
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

its really a shame the ability for this silent racism to remain
Like I said, the door swings both ways.

I would be hard pressed to get a job in an asian convenience store. As a previous poster said, trying to apply in any country with potential barriers causes problems. If I have to interview 25 people I want the ones I think, from using the information they have provided will be the most suitable, time is money.

There are aspects of this everywhere, sexism is the other one, unfortunately we have gone too far and now women are probably getting the better deal in a lot of cases ( government, paid maternity leave, equal pay for less experience pressures etc )
 

Julia

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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Once upon a time, employers could simply hire whomever they wanted.

It was considered their right in terms of having the capacity to choose who they considered would most benefit their business.

And no one told them they shouldn't. Or that they were being unfair, unreasonable or racist.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Luckily in Australia there are some exceptions, with jobs for Aboriginals only.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Once upon a time, employers could simply hire whomever they wanted.

It was considered their right in terms of having the capacity to choose who they considered would most benefit their business.

And no one told them they shouldn't. Or that they were being unfair, unreasonable or racist.
As should a business owner have every right to. The business owner invests their money into the business and finding the right fit should be their right, and nothing to do with the socialists and communists.

Just on hiring people with non-anglo names. What about the banks etc? They hire many foreigners en masse in their call centres.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

its really a shame the ability for this silent racism to remain
That's being creative for a another word: choice.

If the policy of multiculturalism was changed the people with other names would be naturally integrating and the general populace would be more accomodating. unfortunately, due to current policies what we are faced with are centres with other names as the majority etc. where it is very hard for an English named person to even have a sniff of survival.

That silent racism - choice - comes from those centres too.
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Yeah it is a shame Agent - but I suppose it depends on the job..

Most of the big companies wouldnt be like that as they have so much to do with international anyways, so they would be going for the best CV..
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

I would be p#ssed off if someone sent me fake CV's and wasted my time as an employer - just so some academic could get their Phd.
 

rub92me

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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

I declare from now on, every human being on the planet will be called Joe Blow.
There, problem solved. :cool:
 
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Re: Ethnic names' struggle in job search

Just because someone has a ethnic last name doesn't mean they weren't born here, and aren't just as Australian as you are.
 

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