Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

Electric cars?

Would you buy an electric car?

  • Already own one

    Votes: 7 4.6%
  • Yes - would definitely buy

    Votes: 38 24.8%
  • Yes - preferred over petrol car if price/power/convenience similar

    Votes: 66 43.1%
  • Maybe - preference for neither, only concerned with costs etc

    Votes: 28 18.3%
  • No - prefer petrol car even if electric car has same price, power and convenience

    Votes: 17 11.1%
  • No - would never buy one

    Votes: 7 4.6%

  • Total voters
    153
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If you don't believe in unicorns, then these 3 - Li Auto, Xpeng, and NIO - might give people contemplating EVs something to think about:

I don't think any of the above models are coming to Australia in 2022.
Don't be too sure.

While NIO vehicles are not yet available in the US and Australia, their newest electric cars were spotted in Mildura, Victoria. They appeared to have been camouflaged NIO ES8 SUVs driving in the scorching heat.
 
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This is more like it .i trust this morehttps://lavo.com.au/
than lithium battery to ultimately ensure a replacement of the ice fleet.
But is the aim annihilation of the ice fleet or more social engineering and removal of travel from the masses
 
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Don't be too sure.

While NIO vehicles are not yet available in the US and Australia, their newest electric cars were spotted in Mildura, Victoria. They appeared to have been camouflaged NIO ES8 SUVs driving in the scorching heat.
That was NIO's ES6...
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I heard that NIO's right hand drive versions were not going to be produced this year, which is a shame as the ES8's specs/technology are outstanding although it's not exactly pretty (like the ET7). This article suggest an Australian launch this year but all it really concludes is they will be here before 2025.
Of the affordable EVs I saw reviewed in 2021, the Ora Good Cat was my favourite.
 

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One of the policies put up by the ALP prior to the election was to remove the 5 % import tariff on electric vehicles.
One might ask why they would also not remove GST and luxury car taxes as well as some have suggested on the forum.
A cynic might suggest its because the latter will cost some real money, as distinct from the tariff plan.
With the recent signings of various trade agreements, about 70% of the currently imported vehicles would have had the tariff waived.
From Todays Australian
A key plank of Labor’s plan to accelerate electric vehicle sales is redundant, according to Energy Minister Angus Taylor, with more than 70 per cent of car imports being exempt from tariffs under free trade deals.
Mr Taylor said Labor’s plan to waive a 5 per cent import tariff on electric cars would have “close to zero impact on prices or uptake” given the vast majority of cars are already spared from the impost. “Australia’s extensive free trade agreements, entered into by the Coalition, mean that over 70 per cent of our car (electric and petrol) imports are already exempt from import tariffs,” Mr Taylor said.

Moreover, now that a free trade deal has been struck with Britain, Labor’s policy will have no impact on the cost of the five top selling electric cars in Australia.
The German-made Porsche Taycan is the only top selling electric car that is not be covered by a free-trade deal. But the Porsche’s price of $156,000 to $345,000 precludes it from being captured under Labor’s policy as it is classified as a luxury car.

When announcing its policy last year, Labor said the $50,000 Nissan Leaf would be $2000 cheaper without attracting a tariff. This is no longer the case given the tariff was waved under the free-trade deal with Britain which was signed in December
 
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One of the policies put up by the ALP prior to the election was to remove the 5 % import tariff on electric vehicles.
One might ask why they would also not remove GST and luxury car taxes as well as some have suggested on the forum.
A cynic might suggest its because the latter will cost some real money, as distinct from the tariff plan.
With the recent signings of various trade agreements, about 70% of the currently imported vehicles would have had the tariff waived.
From Todays Australian
A key plank of Labor’s plan to accelerate electric vehicle sales is redundant, according to Energy Minister Angus Taylor, with more than 70 per cent of car imports being exempt from tariffs under free trade deals.
Mr Taylor said Labor’s plan to waive a 5 per cent import tariff on electric cars would have “close to zero impact on prices or uptake” given the vast majority of cars are already spared from the impost. “Australia’s extensive free trade agreements, entered into by the Coalition, mean that over 70 per cent of our car (electric and petrol) imports are already exempt from import tariffs,” Mr Taylor said.

Moreover, now that a free trade deal has been struck with Britain, Labor’s policy will have no impact on the cost of the five top selling electric cars in Australia.
The German-made Porsche Taycan is the only top selling electric car that is not be covered by a free-trade deal. But the Porsche’s price of $156,000 to $345,000 precludes it from being captured under Labor’s policy as it is classified as a luxury car.
No mention of removing FBT though?
 
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The staement you quoted said the policy will apply to all vehicles below the luxury car tax.
so the removal of FBT will only apply to vehicles below that figure.
I guess its a a bit each way.

mick
 
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According to Reuters Tesla has delayed production of Tesla's Cyber truck (again) until early 2023.
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan 13 (Reuters) - Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) aims to start initial production of its much-anticipated Cybertruck by the end of the first quarter of 2023, pushing back its plan to begin production late this year, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters on Thursday.

The person said the delay comes as Tesla is changing features and functions of the electric pickup to make a compelling product as competition heats up in the segment.


Tesla is expected to make limited production of the Cybertruck in the first quarter of 2023 before increasing output, the source said.

Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tesla, the world's top electric car maker, makes electric sedans and sport utility vehicles but has missed out on the pickup truck segment, which is profitable and hugely popular in America.

Ford Motor Co (F.N) and Rivian Automotive (RIVN.O) are ahead of Tesla in launching electric pickups.
Both the Ford Ligtning and Rivian have already had first deliveries to the general Public.
By my count, this is the fourth push back for the Cybertruck.
Despite the first cab off the rank in announcements, back in 2019, the others have now have gone past Tesla.
At this rate , even GM may beat them out of the gate with its electric Hummer pickup due for delivery September 2022 and Hummer SUV due in early 2023.
Another postponement by Tesla would even put them behind the GMC Sierra Denali EV.
Mick
 
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Even the French can change their mind and cancel contracts, who would have thought, but when something doesn't make sense plans have to change.
 
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Today's news -

"Trucking industry: Make trucks electric to lift suburban curfews and ease congestion

Switching to electric delivery trucks rather than diesel-powered ones could mean cutting noise, congestion and pollution on suburban and city streets as freight curfews are lifted, with the trucking industry backing an energy switch that it says will save companies money.

Internal combustion engines are louder, pollute more and have higher running costs, while quiet electric engines could power trucks for nighttime deliveries around urban areas, avoiding the curfews many councils currently place on diesel trucks, reducing traffic congestion.

The Australian Trucking Association (ATA) has produced a report with the Electric Vehicle Council advocating a switch to electric vehicles to reduce health impacts and save the industry money.

“It costs about $117 to fuel a diesel truck for 300 kilometres, but just $18 for an electric truck,” ATA chairman David Smith said....
.."

 
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The vibe is spreading...

I have a few problems with this article.
Firstly, it calls the unit a carbon neutral charger.
These sort of statements puzzle me because the generator burns the oil from the deep fryer.
In burning, it releases CO2 into the atmosphere, but somehow is carbon nuetral.
Secondly, the article states that it will take about 20 litres of used cooking oil to charge a car.
At that rate they are going to have to sell hell of a lot of chips to generate sufficient capacity to charge more than 1 car per day.
It says the unit cost $75,000 and was crowd funded.
Why would they not put a series of solar panels with batteries to run the remote charger?
I may be wrong, but I seem to recall the last time I drove through there, the Caiguna roadhouse already has a solar panel array to supply the roadhouse with electricity
Just does not make a lot of sense to me.
Mick
 
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I have a few problems with this article.
Firstly, it calls the unit a carbon neutral charger.
These sort of statements puzzle me because the generator burns the oil from the deep fryer.
In burning, it releases CO2 into the atmosphere, but somehow is carbon nuetral.
Secondly, the article states that it will take about 20 litres of used cooking oil to charge a car.
At that rate they are going to have to sell hell of a lot of chips to generate sufficient capacity to charge more than 1 car per day.
It says the unit cost $75,000 and was crowd funded.
Why would they not put a series of solar panels with batteries to run the remote charger?
I may be wrong, but I seem to recall the last time I drove through there, the Caiguna roadhouse already has a solar panel array to supply the roadhouse with electricity
Just does not make a lot of sense to me.
Mick
I guess it's a 'proof of concept ' arrangement at this point rather than a commercial product.
 
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I have a few problems with this article.
Firstly, it calls the unit a carbon neutral charger.
These sort of statements puzzle me because the generator burns the oil from the deep fryer.
In burning, it releases CO2 into the atmosphere, but somehow is carbon nuetral.
Secondly, the article states that it will take about 20 litres of used cooking oil to charge a car.
At that rate they are going to have to sell hell of a lot of chips to generate sufficient capacity to charge more than 1 car per day.
It says the unit cost $75,000 and was crowd funded.
Why would they not put a series of solar panels with batteries to run the remote charger?
I may be wrong, but I seem to recall the last time I drove through there, the Caiguna roadhouse already has a solar panel array to supply the roadhouse with electricity
Just does not make a lot of sense to me.
Mick
Mike, please stop it.you are mixing technology, science, common sense and number, next you will be labelled an antivax
Obviously, to get that used oil there will be a long way for the delivery truck..or a bloody high consumption of fried goods by the local community..with the obvious health effects ...
Not to say it is not a good idea to recycle cooking oil...but even the most obvious common sense needs to be wiped from some of these green economy,CC or covid articles..
Yes solar panels would obviously be the way to go and a diesel generator running on cooking oil if you want as backup
 
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I guess it's a 'proof of concept ' arrangement at this point rather than a commercial product.
Thirty years ago there was a guy who went around the local ag shows and field days demonstrating a holden statesman running on used frying oil. Had to go through a fairly stiff filtering process or it clogged up the injectors, so its not a new process,.
Attaching the output shaft to a generator is not new, and charging stations are everywhere.
Mick
 
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Thirty years ago there was a guy who went around the local ag shows and field days demonstrating a holden statesman running on used frying oil. Had to go through a fairly stiff filtering process or it clogged up the injectors, so its not a new process,.
Attaching the output shaft to a generator is not new, and charging stations are everywhere.
Mick

Did the Statesman have a diesel engine conversion?

A mate converted his Hilux, the exhaust did give off a strange odour but smelt better than the diesel fumes. Kept it for about a year and then sold it, neve saw it again.

 
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