• Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

Hello and welcome to Aussie Stock Forums!

To gain full access you must register. Registration is free and takes only a few seconds to complete.

Already a member? Log in here.

Conversations with ex-military

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by wayneL, Jul 10, 2019.

sentifi.com

Aussie Stock Forum Sentifi Top themes and market attention on:

  1. wayneL

    wayneL Rotaredom

    Posts:
    17,464
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    I've never served, but my Dad did in ww2. He was horrifically injured so never let his sons go anywhere near it. He never spoke about it, ever.

    I guess because I never got to hear his story, I find it fascinating to hear the stories of others. Just spent 5 hours (was supposed to be somewhere else, but nevermind) talking to a special forces guy who served in Afghanistan. To say I was riveted is an understatement. It helps me to understand my father, vicariously through them. Geez I've got enough material over the years from various grunts, SAS, and a guy who was a submariner during the Cold War to write a book.

    Anyway, the recurring theme is the difference between our guys and the Americans. Emblematic of that difference is the regard of the North Vietnamese...

    They still seethe about the Americans, yet have great respect for our guys.

    Anyway, depending if this thread develops, I think it it would be interesting to share some of those stories... not to glorify war, but to honour what these people did.
     
  2. satanoperca

    satanoperca

    Posts:
    1,425
    Likes Received:
    382
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    As someone who has spent a bit of time in both North and South Vietnam, all I can say is the chemical legacy the USA has left is disgusting. I don't blame the North Vietnamese hating the Americans.

    Some little facts
    It is estimated that over 7 1/2 million tons of bombs were dropped on Indochina, the vast majority on North Vietnam. Compared to less that 2 1/4 million tons in all of WW2, and the 1.5 million tons droppedon Germany and it's held territories in Europe.

    If we take into account area, total area of Vietnam 330K km2, the figures change upwards even more dramatically. Approx 22 ton of bombs per km2.

    Agent Orange was the most widely used herbicide in Vietnam, and the most potent. ... More than 13 million gallons of Agent Orange was used in Vietnam, or almost two-thirds of the total amount of herbicides used during the entire Vietnam War.

    Then research the long terms effect of this chemical agent and the amount of compensation paid by govnuts and produces.


    It is f---king disgusting.

     
    Garpal Gumnut likes this.
  3. IFocus

    IFocus You are arguing with a Galah

    Posts:
    4,256
    Likes Received:
    676
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Both grand fathers served in the trenches of France one lost a leg only survivor of 15 when the shell landed in their trench he never received a pension unfortunately both passed away before I was born.

    One of my in-laws served in Vietnam (conscript) really nice bloke and is the typically affected veteran as are most of the guys who served with him.

    Tells a good story about a young officer who joined their armoured carrier (in-law was a driver) and gives the order that they head down the road to shoot up the VC that had a road block happening.
    The in-law and the Corporal say no the VC do that after they have mined the road we will get blown up.
    Officer starts talking about getting a chopper out to fly them back for court martial.

    Mean while a South Viet truck loaded with South Viet troops heads of down the road.
    The explosion was that big from the mine it blew the motor out of the truck for a 100 mts killing all on board with not to many remains to be found.

    All talk of court martial vanished :).

    Mines were a problem for the carriers as they did the mail runs and acted in support of the troops in the field blowing the floor of the carrier flat to the roof right where the driver sits seen a few photos also because the carriers did the field support they stayed in the field longer and saw more action.
     
    wayneL likes this.
  4. wayneL

    wayneL Rotaredom

    Posts:
    17,464
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Chatting with my new friend again this morning...

    I guess its a touchy subject many don't want to talk about (thanks for the input @satanoperca & @IFocus )

    Regailed with a few more stories of Afghanistan. Special forces are required by law to see a shrink once a year, ol'mate reckons he tells us much more than he tells his shrink... feel pretty privilaged to be trusted with that, of which those details will never be passed on.

    I try to imagine myself in those circumstances... Can't... Would I be a coward or would I stump up... and how would I psychologically survive the trauma? Just dunno.

    I had a good friend that served in the Australian Navy as a Submariner during the Cold War. Unfortunately he is now deceased from lung cancer, a non-smoker, makes you wonder.

    There is a lot of crap that went on underwater back then that you and I never ever knew about.... scary shxt.

    It certainly messed his head up that is for sure. The very least I could do is lend an ear and let him download.

    We owe a lot to these people.
     
    Garpal Gumnut, IFocus and SirRumpole like this.
  5. sptrawler

    sptrawler

    Posts:
    11,930
    Likes Received:
    2,556
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2009
    My Grandfather was a sea Captain in WW2 transporting troops between India and Singapore, he didn't talk much about his time at sea, I don't think he had fond memories.
     
    wayneL, Garpal Gumnut and IFocus like this.
  6. satanoperca

    satanoperca

    Posts:
    1,425
    Likes Received:
    382
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Wayne, I have a closer story to heart.

    My Uncle (really a very close family friend) had a massive scar over his face. No family member would every answer my question as a young boy, why does he have the massive scar, even my Auntie only new it was when he was in the war.

    He never spoke about it, but my curiosity got the better of me, I wanted to know, so I made up a little lie, I told my Uncle I had to complete an assignment at school and could he help me, I needed some insight into what it was like to be a soldier in a war, he agreed.

    I was young and foolish, I should have never have asked, but I did. He was old at the time, 68 I believe.
    We sat down, I asked him some broad questions, he answered, after a few hours, I plucked up the courage to ask him, what happened to your face, I question I wish I never asked.

    He then told me he had told no one, not his wife nor his children, he was to ashamed. At that instance, I failed to understand what I was about to be told and the burden a good man had carried all his life.

    He explained that a land mind had gone off, which caused the damage to his face and then to be shown to his torso. At the time, I tried to understand why he was crying, trying to comfort him that was not something to be ashamed off, **** happens in war.

    But alias, that was not the reason why he never spoke about it. The land mind did go off, but his best friend from early childhood was the one that stood on it. While his mate survived the initial impact, he lost all of his body from the wast down, his guts spilling out. My uncles best friend, looked up at him and asked him one simple request, please end my life now. My Uncle had no other choice, but as he told the story, raised his rifle, placing on his best friends forehead and pulled the trigger, ending his best friends life.

    We cried together for the next few hours, the emotion was incredible, I had no words to say, I could have never imagined the pain my Uncle suffered for his life knowing that he did the right thing, but he still had to take the life of his best friend.

    I left his house that night after putting him to sleep, I was an emotional wreck, just 16 years of age at the time.

    My auntie called me 2 days later, asking me what we had talked about, I could not tell he, as my Uncle had made me swear not to tell a sole until he was in the grave. I found this hard, but a promise is a promise as much as she demanded to know what we had talk about. I asked why she was so persistent, she only replied that he husband of 1/2 a century was different, calm and at peace.

    He passed away 3 days later. At the time I felt responsible, I shouldn't have asked, but the day before the funeral i sat down with my Auntie and told her what we discussed and what happened, apologizing that I was responsible for he husbands death.

    She held me in her arms and thank me for letting he husband/best friend finally rest and was thankful to at least know what he husband could never talk about to her or their children for over 50 years. He died finally at piece.

    The moral of this story is F---K WAR, no one WINS.
     
Loading...

Share This Page