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CEOs Sleeping Rough for a Night

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Julia, Jun 21, 2012.

  1. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    Tonight apparently some business and government leaders will be making their token gesture toward recognising the plight of the homeless by snuggling into their feather sleeping bags and camping outside for the night.

    What is your feeling about this?

    Is it a genuine attempt to draw attention to the misery of thousands of Australians who sleep on the streets every night?

    Or is it a patronising gesture which actually rather demeans the reality and dignity of those homeless people when we all know it's just a publicity stunt and the great leaders will be a bit uncomfortable for a few hours but then go home to their warm comfortable homes and their secure incomes.

    Perhaps it's better than nothing, and I'm being unreasonably critical. What's your view?
     
  2. Garpal Gumnut

    Garpal Gumnut

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    I think that historians of the future will view these fattened feys as akin to clerics of the Middle Ages who fasted.

    Let us hope they do not go blind sinning in the middle of the night in their Kathmandu bags.

    gg
     
  3. Tightwad

    Tightwad

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    There should be a vote as to which CEO's we'd like to see doing it
     
  4. disarray

    disarray

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    the CEO of my arm of a multinational is doing it, and he sent out an email asking for donations. he's aimed for $5,000 and the money goes to vinnies. at last check the CEO of commonwealth bank was already sponsored for $166,000 to do it and gail kelly was at $122,000.

    so yeah if it was just a big show i'd be cynical, but vinnies stands to make some serious money out of this event (donations are currently at $4.7 million nationwide) so you can't really argue with that.

    CEO Sleepout
     
  5. basilio

    basilio

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    Great idea and great result.

    And of all nights to be sleeping rough tonight has to be one of the best/worst.

    ________________________________________________________

    Just had a look at the website and it really was a very clever way to get the competitive juices flowing amongst the CEO's. The CEO is the flag bearer for the company and each of them is effectively trying to raise the most money through his/her staff and friends. (Mine is bigger than yours...)

    I can see that in black way many staff members would like to see their CEO sleep rough for a night and kick in a few bucks to keep them there ;)
     
  6. DB008

    DB008

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  7. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    Yes, I hadn't realised donations were involved. That puts a quite different light on it.
    ABC Local Radio covered it all night last night, talking to CEOs, politicians and homeless people themselves from 2am to 5am across the country. Really impressive and I'd say effective.
    Homelessness in Australia is something that does really concern me and this was definitely heightened by the ABC coverage.

    I retract my initial cynicism.

    Good point. I don't think it was too bad in Darwin, but obviously pretty tough going in the rain in Melbourne and Canberra.
     
  8. Garpal Gumnut

    Garpal Gumnut

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    +1

    gg
     
  9. McLovin

    McLovin

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    +1

    Our school had a weekly volunteering thing there, which I did pretty regularly. Those guys who run it do amazing work.
     
  10. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    It's a good way to raise awareness in my opinion, donations collected being a worthwhile bonus.

    I assume the choice of timing is because it's the shortest day.
     
  11. Miss Hale

    Miss Hale

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    I think these sort of things are good as a one off but once they have been done a few times the novelty wears off a bit IMO. It's a bit like those nude calenders; great idea the first time but then everyone started doing them - I mean how many calenders of naked geriatric bowling club members/CWA members/Firemen etc. can you fit on your laundry walls? ;). However, if they are still raising large amounts of money via these things then it's hard to argue against it.
     
  12. Gringotts Bank

    Gringotts Bank

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    Let's encourage politicians to get in on the act. I'd like to pair up Gina Rhinehart and Kevin Rudd to share a blanket and a bowl of soup. Let's make it more realistic.... say one month.
     
  13. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    Malcolm Turnbull and Kevin Rudd did participate last night. Also Tim Nicholls, Qld Treasurer, the SA Treasurer, amongst others. There were also people from various NGOs, Housing initiatives etc.
    The whole thing seemed very well organised.

    Good for St Vinnies. They're a great example, along with the Salvos, of religion doing something really worthwhile on an ongoing and non-judgmental basis.
     
  14. Gringotts Bank

    Gringotts Bank

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    Well I don't like it. If people want to help, then volunteer at a shelter, give money or open up your house to a homeless person. Sleeping on the street for one night is a patronizing stunt. It's like going without food for a few days and thinking that this somehow helps starving Africans.
     
  15. prawn_86

    prawn_86 Mod: Call me Dendrobranchiata

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    They have given money, and lots of it. Its no different that those who run a marathon and raise money to give to charity or something like that imo. It's easier to say 'sponsor me to do this' rather than just say 'give me some money so i can donate it instead of you donating it directly'...
     
  16. Gringotts Bank

    Gringotts Bank

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    "Sponsor me to do this" = giving away other people's money.

    Why are they asking anyone for anything? If they have the heart to give their own money, or a spare room in their own house, then that's great.

    If someone wants to run a marathon, then run a marathon.
     
  17. prawn_86

    prawn_86 Mod: Call me Dendrobranchiata

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    Totally agree, however it is a proven way of raising money. Australias Greatest Shave is another example
     
  18. Calliope

    Calliope

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    As I understand it, it is to put pressure on the Gillard government to extend their commitment "that no illegal immigrant will go homeless" to the commitment "that no Australian will go homeless," especially indigenous Australians.

    Just joking.:D

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ_MfzT-iRe9AVomfAiDPNdG7lJMp3vny3f7vkMC-I96lPPo4z8.jpg
     
  19. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Because it seems that people will only donate if they are asked and get something themselves in return for donating.

    It's the same with raffle tickets, those charity chocolates and all the rest. You pay an excessive price for something, with the profits going to the charity in question. Eg you pay $2 for a chocolate bar that would normally cost half that amount (and which cost the charity even less). You get an overpriced chocolate, the charity gets (I'm guessing) two thirds of the price you paid and the manufacturer probably ends up selling more chocolates than they otherwise would. Everyone wins. Sure, you could just donate the money directly and not get anything in return but it seems that giving people something back is a means of encouraging them to donate. So be it - those who disagree could simply put their money in the box and not take any chocolates. I doubt that many do so however.

    I donate to worthwhile causes but I actively avoid situations where I am pursued by charity collectors. I find that far more irritating than someone sleeping outside, running a marathon, not eating or whatever as a means to encourage people to donate.:2twocents
     
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