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Australian Federal Election - 2019

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Wysiwyg, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. Wysiwyg

    Wysiwyg Everyone wants money

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    The BS has started to flow freely.

    1) Tax sugary and alcoholic drinks to raise $3 billion to tackle obesity and health issues.

    My thought - don't tell people what they can or cannot do with their bodies.

    2) Labor - Tackle online accommodation duopoly Booking..com and Expedia..com by having people choose direct booking. Claim was the online booking agents charge up to 30% more.

    My thought - I fact checked a random Gold Coast resort (Sheraton Grand Mirage) with same dates and room and adults and found Booking..com was exactly the same price as booking direct throught Sheraton. The Labor preacher lied.

    3) Labor - Apprentice numbers have fallen away since the Coalition held Government.

    My thought - Did Bill 'I promise a budget deficit' Shorten ever consider manufacturing automation has taken many trade jobs and will continue to do so.

    What is noticable is the pollies and lobbiest assume people are stupid and while some are, the rest should not have to bear consequence. As I said, the BS is starting to flow freely.
     
    qldfrog likes this.
  2. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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    My thought, don't tax me to treat heart disease, diabetes and strokes when they can be prevented.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2019
    Wysiwyg likes this.
  3. Wysiwyg

    Wysiwyg Everyone wants money

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    Yeah Health will be big as usual. Charging the tax payers more while the Health Industry adjust charges upward. Don't people realise dentists and doctors charge the maximum they can get away with. They incorporate Private Health Insurance into their charges.

    Like any Government contracts or rebates or support, the system gets squeezed hard.
     
    qldfrog likes this.
  4. Miss Hale

    Miss Hale

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    I don't drink sugary drinks and not much alcohol so if they jacked up the price of both of them it would not really affect me. I agree with @Wysiwyg though to a degree, I mean if these things are sooo bad, why not just ban them? Same goes for cigarettes. Obvious reason, govt want to cash in tax wise.

    Re the booking companies, I think it the accommodation places that really suffer as some have told me that they lose a lot of money using the booking agencies. For big hotel chains I suppose it's not a big deal but for small operations it can make a big difference. Same goes for Uber Eats. The restaurants hate it but they can't not do it because it's so widely used.
     
  5. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    It's a pretty decent % cut that the booking agencies take. I can't remember the figures but we're talking 10's of % not just some token fee.

    Presumably that's then built-in to the rates charged by hotels meaning everyone's paying for this privately collected "booking tax" regardless of how they actually book.
     
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  6. Logique

    Logique Investor

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    Who's next on your hit list of those undeserving of public medicine? ...smokers, drinkers, sun melanomas, the industrially deaf and headphone deaf...contact sport participants?
     
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  7. sptrawler

    sptrawler

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    I use booking.com quite a lot, from my experience the price you pay on their site, in most cases is cheaper than dealing direct with the provider.
    I don't know why or how they do it, but most times I have checked, that has been the case.
    One example that comes to mind was while we were doing the Mundi Biddi bike ride,I booked accommodation in Manjimup, it was a lot cheaper on line than direct. Maybe the rack rate is working on the premise that you will take it, rather than shop around.
     
  8. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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    Prevention is better than cure, that's all.
     
  9. PZ99

    PZ99 ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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    Education is the key IMV.
     
  10. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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    You can try, but it's expensive and people forget. eg the "Be in it" campaign.
     
  11. basilio

    basilio

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    Well the first big bribes oops policy initiatives are being rolled out.

    ScoMo is offering pensioners $75 a single /$125 a pair for their votes oops power bill gift.

    Cheap as Chops is the old boy. What really gets up my nose is that the absolute poorest and most desperate of welfare recipients , the unemployed , won't get a zac. Zilch. Nuthing . Clearly don't need it and not worth it.

    The man is a creep. Can't even bribe straight. I hope this latest dribble gets treated with the contempt it deserves by the electorate.
    ______________________________________
    Again on policies. Finally Labour comes out with something resembling a thoughtful way to move us to a clean, electric future powered by renewable energy. Then some dimwit Energy Minister tries to say the Tradies will be unable to use their wheels. Industry has turned on him and told him to wake up and smell the roses. Electric vehicles are coming because they are better and make sense.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/po...l-leave-tradies-stranded-20190401-p519q2.html
     
  12. SirRumpole

    SirRumpole

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    Not convinced yet. They are certainly a good way for power companies to increase their profits.

    We should be looking at hybrids before going all electric.
     
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  13. sptrawler

    sptrawler

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    There is way too much dreaming, fairy dust and blue sky rhetoric, going on in the electric car space. IMO
     
  14. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976

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    Something I've noticed about debates concerning electric vehicles is that they tend to be derailed by those who insist on perfection. An argument that says if we can't have 100% EV's then we shouldn't have any. Like what the government is saying about Labor's policy.

    Just because someone charging their EV in the middle of nowhere will be using power from a diesel generator isn't actually a problem. Nor is it a problem to have a mix of vehicles on the road, it's not as though EV's need separate roads or something like that.

    Where government does have a role is getting around the "chicken or the egg" problem of publicly available charging infrastructure. In short, we need to ensure that if someone wishes to travel from Darwin to Hobart via Perth WA then they can do so and find adequate opportunities for recharging along the way.

    Fast chargers are one thing. Encouraging motels, car parks and so on to install chargers is another (motels being particularly relevant for those traveling long distances - they'll be staying somewhere overnight). And so on. We need infrastructure for EV's.

    Now someone will probably argue that some of these remote area EV chargers won't be profitable. Indeed they won't be, just like the road it sits beside is also unprofitable due to the low volume of traffic on it but I don't hear too many calls to rip up rural roads.:2twocents
     
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  15. bellenuit

    bellenuit

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    What is taking off, particularly in Europe and China, is micro-mobility: electric bicycles and the like. I have read figures that suggest that there are 10 of these category of vehicle sold for every electric car.







     
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  16. PZ99

    PZ99 ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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    This is the unbelievable offer... what can go wrong? Everybody should have one!

    Renault ZOE > https://myelectriccar.com.au/renault-main/renault-zoe/

    Specs:

    Range – 300 kms (NEDC range 400kms)
    Acceleration – 0 to 100kph approx 13.5 secs

    Top Speed – 135 kph
    Rear Cargo Space – 338 litre
    Seats – 5 Seater
    NCAP – 5 Star Rating

    Pure Electric
    Battery Pack – 41kWh
    Charge Time – 7KW single phase 32A – 7hours 30mins
    Charge Time – 22KW three phase 32A -2hours 40mins
    Rapid Charge 50kW – 0-80% in 60 mins
    65kW electric motor
    Drivetrain – front wheel drive
    Free Wall Mounted Charger

    Price: AUD $51,000 drive away

    Bill Shorten / NRMA want people to throw $50K down this toilet ?

    Great for a place like King Island - a bloody joke on the mainland.
     
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  17. basilio

    basilio

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    Or perhaps a Hybrid Corolla?
    2019 Toyota Corolla ZR hybrid review
    Kez Casey
    Road Tester
    06 October 2018

    [​IMG]
    $24,610 – $29,260 Dealer

    • Fuel Economy
      4.2L
    Engine Power
    • 72kW
    • CO2 Emissions
      97g
    • ANCAP Rating
      5Stars
    More Toyota Corolla
    News & Reviews

    Visit our Toyota Showroom
    Tech like a Prius, but at a much sharper price and in a much sharper suit. A hybrid might not be the first thing you think of when looking for a small car, but the Corolla hybrid makes a compelling case for itself.
    https://www.caradvice.com.au/688928/2018-toyota-corolla-zr-hybrid-review/
     
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  18. Junior

    Junior

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    I could respond by posting the specs for an overpriced, petrol powered vehicle. But what's the point?
     
  19. sptrawler

    sptrawler

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    The problem the hybrid has, it isn't as vote catching as full electric, despite its obvious advantages at this point in time.
    Whatever you do, don't get between a politician and the truth, when there are votes involved.
     
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  20. PZ99

    PZ99 ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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    The point is you could equally post the details for a petrol "Nanna" vehicle with far better specs and practicability for less than half the price of the Zoe electric.

    But if NRMA had their way, you wouldn't be able to buy one in a few years which then extends to less available parts and more expensive servicing. Exactly what they want.

    It sums up NRMA pretty well - they charge ridiculous prices for their services so it's no surprise why they believe that any old nanna can just lift out $50k from nowhere and be forced into a vehicle with inferior performance.
     
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