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Abolishing Abortion in the US

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The US Supreme Court has overturned Wade vs Roe and allowed half of the US States to immediately halt abortions at will. In the most egregious situations State laws enable bounty hunters to sue women who seek abortions as well as anyone who helps them in any way. There is $10,000 on the table for these abortion bounty hunters and free legal costs to pursue their claims.

So what will happen to the hundred/thousands of children who fall pregnant to family abuse ? For example the 9, 10,12 year old girls turning up with child in Texas?
Check out this story for one of darkest consequences of this disastrous decision.

The most innocent victims of Texas abortion ban: Children forced to carry their abuser’s baby

“This is never the story these families had written for themselves.” The Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center handles the county’s toughest cases.​

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Amid a supply closet filled with clothes and toys, a shelf of "court/coping bags" is a stark reminder of why children and their caregivers wind up at the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center, which works with the county's most heinous criminal sexual assault cases. The "coping bags" are filled with snacks and quiet distractions to help victims feel as relaxed as possible during courtroom proceedings.(Shelby Tauber / Special Contributor)
By Sharon Grigsby
9:19 AM on Oct 15, 2021 GMT-5


Update: This story has been updated following the June 24, 2022 Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade.
The Dallas County mother sensed something wasn’t right with her young daughter. A trip to the doctor revealed the truth: The 11-year-old was pregnant.
The girl was too young to comprehend her medical condition — or to understand that the terrifying and secretive “game” that her father had inflicted on her for months was rape.

It’s understandable if you feel you can’t bear to read any further, but this 11-year-old and the many others like her deserve our attention now more than ever. The Supreme Court has decided that the right to abortion, upheld for the last almost 50 years, no longer exists.
Related:Abortion gave Texas women a voice. Will ending Roe v. Wade silence us?

Already exploited by their rapists, these children now also suffer the consequences of Texas’ so-called “heartbeat” law, which bans almost all abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy even in cases of rape, sexual abuse and incest.
Having suffered the worst possible violence, these girls must carry and deliver their rapist’s child. They’ll endure the physical and emotional trauma involved in pregnancy, birth and a lifetime of ensuing consequences that can be as awful as the initial sexual abuse.

That’s an unjust fate for all women, but today I want to focus on these youngest victims whom most people aren’t even aware of.
In just one recent month, seven pregnant 12-year-olds and their caregivers sought help at the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center, which handles the most serious criminal sexual abuse cases in the county and where victims first share the atrocities in which they have been trapped.
“You go down and meet with them for the first time and they look every bit 12 years old,” Mindy Jackson, director of support services. told me. “They’re small, young, in a cute little T-shirt and rainbow shoelaces.”
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All families dealing with a rape-induced pregnancy “already have an additional bucket of awful they have to work through,” says Katrina Cook, director of clinical services at the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center.(Shelby Tauber / Special Contributor)

The center doesn’t release overall pregnancy statistics, out of concern of further stigmatizing those it helps. But staff members told me of recent pregnant rape victims as young as 9 years old.
“It’s been the same with a lot of 10-year-olds and even more 11- and 12-year-olds,” said Katrina Cook, director of clinical services.

The Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center can’t afford the time or potential fallout to get caught up in political debates. Its job is to support victims and their families from the moment of that first forensic interview with the child until the family’s ”graduation day” from therapy.
But this is also a staff committed to healing children’s trauma by offering as many options and resources as possible — and the new Texas abortion law creates only limitations.

 
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Only in America..:(

New Texas law opens up abortion bounty hunting

By
Nicole Goodkind
July 10, 2021 8:07 AM GMT+10


Subscribe to Fortune Daily to get essential business stories straight to your inbox each morning.

An antiabortion law in Texas will soon allow any U.S. citizen to sue Texas-based abortion clinics, doctors, and anyone who aids in an abortion. If successful, the petitioner, who does not have to reside in Texas, will receive an $10,000 award and the cost for attorney’s fees. Pro-choice advocates worry that this cash prize may create a new cottage industry of aggressive antiabortion bounty hunters.

The provision, which passed the Texas state legislature this spring, is part of a larger antiabortion bill which will ban all abortions after a doctor detects a fetal heartbeat, usually around the six-week mark.

Many don’t know they are pregnant before six weeks. For most people, a six-week ban would stop access to abortion just two weeks after a missed period.

 

moXJO

menace to society
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It's not our problem.

The US is a democracy, they can solve their own problems.

However it does say something about the appointment of judges both in the US and Australia.

Having politicians appoint them does not seem to be the best option.
Or the states can vote out Republicans at the state level.
Personally I think this hurts Republicans more than it helps them.
 

wayneL

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However it does say something about the appointment of judges both in the US and Australia.

Having politicians appoint them does not seem to be the best option.
Nup.

As distasteful as the outcome some may find, the decision was correct, constitutionally. Therefore the process has worked as intended.

As you pointed out, it is now up to each states voters to vote to either uphold or repeal their own laws in this regard.

As Mo said, probably going to work against the 'pubs in some states.
 
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Nup.

As distasteful as the outcome some may find, the decision was correct, constitutionally. Therefore the process has worked as intended.

As you pointed out, it is now up to each states voters to vote to either uphold or repeal their own laws in this regard.

As Mo said, probably going to work against the 'pubs in some states.
Theoretically ... If there was a fair election.
But that isn't going to happen is it ?

And in which xxxxing universe was this decision "constitutionally correct" :rolleyes:

The Repubs have been very busy
1) Gerrymandering the electorates
2) Changing election laws to ensure more of the right people vote and less of the non right
3) Giving State legislatures power to make decisions that override election results
4) Creating byzantine abortion laws that can't be effectively challenged
5) Getting the Supreme Court to validate local control of all elections

Their game plan is very, very good and most of it is in place.

 
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And in which xxxxing universe was this decision "constitutionally correct" :rolleyes:
Well I'm not an expert in American law, but if the US Constitution says that the States have the right to determine their ow laws in regards to abortion, then that was the judgement of the Supreme Court which and was Constitutionally correct.
 
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Where Texas is regarding abortion.

Texas lawmakers test how far their threats against abortions can reach

Letters warning of felony charges for firms who offer funds could set up a showdown over constitutional rights

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A clinic escort for the Houston Women’s Clinic walks a patient into the building on 1 October 2021. Republican lawmakers have threatened Texas firms who offer to fund out-of-state travel for abortions. Photograph: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

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Poppy Noor

@PoppyNoor
Sun 24 Jul 2022 07.00 BSTLast modified on Sun 24 Jul 2022 07.02 BST


Republican lawmakers have sent legal threats to Texas organizations that offer to fund out-of-state travel for abortions, potentially setting up a showdown between abortion law and long-held constitutional rights such as freedom of association and freedom of travel.

The Texas Freedom Caucus, a conservative faction of Republicans in the state legislature, sent a letter on 7 July to a law firm that offered to cover employees’ expenses if they travelled for abortion. It threatened Sidley LLP with felony charges, claiming Texas can criminalize anyone who “furnishes the means” for an abortion, regardless of where the abortion occurs. The letter cites a 1925 law which was not formally repealed after the supreme court codified the right to abortion in Roe v Wade in 1973; last week, the Texas supreme court confirmed the 1925 law can be applied.



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House approves legislation to protect abortion access across US

Read more
The lawmakers also outlined proposed legislation that would allow individuals to sue anyone who financially assists with a Texan’s abortion, regardless of where the abortion occurs. The law proposes that such assistance be considered criminal even if a Texan travelled out of state for a medication abortion and took part of the drug in Texas.

Texas already allows individuals to bring civil cases on abortion, potentially costing defendants tens of thousands of dollars; the proposed new legislation would build on it, making defendants liable for actions that happen out-of-state, even where abortion is still legal.


The letter is just the latest move by rightwing lawmakers, lawyers and activists to crack down on abortion provision in Texas. Last week, the state’s attorney general, Ken Paxton, sued the Biden administration for mandating that states provide abortions in medical emergencies. In March, a state legislator, Briscoe Cain, sent a cease and desist letter to Citibank, who had announced a policy to pay for employees’ out of state abortion expenses.

 
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