Australian (ASX) Stock Market Forum

A message to all you unregistered lurkers out there...

Joe Blow

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Welcome to all our newly registered ASF members! There were a few more new registrations than usual yesterday. I wonder if this thread was responsible? Perhaps we can do it again today.

To those who have recently registered, here are a few brief pointers to get you started:

1. Don't be afraid to post. If you are a beginner to the stock market and feel you don't yet have anything of substance to contribute, sometimes even asking a simple question can generate a lot of discussion. So if you have a question or a comment, please just go ahead and start posting.

2. Use the site search function. With nearly 21,000 threads here at ASF, there is a wealth of knowledge and information out there. For a more detailed description about using the ASF site search, take a look at this thread: Tips on using ASF's search function.

3. Please be nice to others and obey the forum rules. At the bottom of every page, you will see a link to the Code of Conduct and the ASF Posting Guidelines. These two documents provide a detailed description of what is expected of all ASF members. However, for a brief overview, take a look at The Five Commandments of Aussie Stock Forums.

4. If you have any suggestions, complaints or feedback, please feel free to let me know by posting in this thread: Give me your suggestions, complaints and feedback! I am always interested in what people think will improve ASF and make it a better experience for all. Alternatively, you can contact me by private message if you prefer.

Thank you for taking the time to register and becoming a part of the ASF community. :)
 

Julia

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Hello sydbod and getbetter: Maybe whilst you're waiting a bit to contribute to stock threads, you might like to join some of the 'General Chat' discussions?

Some fresh input would be really welcome.:)
 
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This really is the longest running thread I have ever seen but it has worked and I have now joined.
It's all about the numbers, hey Joe.

Numbers of members and numbers of beers!
 
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It could be that many, like myself at times, visit ASF but do not bother to sign in. Or maybe it's a combination of shocking performances in the mining sector, and more recently the oil sector, that has frightened many away from investing in Australia. The weak Aussie may be a turning point though, however, calling how low is a gamble too far for most.
I do suspect however that the Aussie ASIC is far more intrusive and feared in Australia than the UKs FCA.

Probably the only way to go forward is for ASF to allow much shorter posts on its stock threads. Looking at ADVFN in the UK the short posts do just one thing, they create more posts and do generate more sensible posts amongst these - maybe they are rubbish but no one cares all that much, after all, if someone becomes a pain in the neck they can be filtered.

So what I'm suggesting is, that ASF give it a try by allowing shorter posts just to see how it works out. Also dropping the requirement to give an explanation; if ADVFN brought in rules as in ASF if would collapse or a more favorite term 'hit the wall'.
 

Joe Blow

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It could be that many, like myself at times, visit ASF but do not bother to sign in. Or maybe it's a combination of shocking performances in the mining sector, and more recently the oil sector, that has frightened many away from investing in Australia. The weak Aussie may be a turning point though, however, calling how low is a gamble too far for most.

Hi noirua, I agree that the downturn in commodities prices and the subsequent collapse of mining stocks across the board has made the stock market look very risky and unappealing, especially when real estate prices seem to be going in only one direction: up.

The reality is that property is still the hot market in Australia, and the stock market has suffered, particularly with retail investors, as available investment capital gets thrown into residential real estate.

Probably the only way to go forward is for ASF to allow much shorter posts on its stock threads. Looking at ADVFN in the UK the short posts do just one thing, they create more posts and do generate more sensible posts amongst these - maybe they are rubbish but no one cares all that much, after all, if someone becomes a pain in the neck they can be filtered.

So what I'm suggesting is, that ASF give it a try by allowing shorter posts just to see how it works out. Also dropping the requirement to give an explanation; if ADVFN brought in rules as in ASF if would collapse or a more favorite term 'hit the wall'.

Restrictions on the length of posts in stock threads have been gone for almost five years now. Of course, I would prefer that more content be posted than less, but it is no longer mandatory that posts in stock threads contain a minimum amount of content.

I think the slowdown in posting in recent times is largely due to a general disinterest in the stock market. Real estate investment has become a bit of a national obsession and the stock market has gone off the boil, firstly due to the GFC and then to the global collapse in commodities prices. Meanwhile, the media articles on real estate appear almost daily; "Australia's Most Undervalued Suburbs", "Real Estate Prices: How Has Your Suburb Performed?", "The Nation's Cheapest Beachside Real Estate", and so on.

All bubbles eventually end, and when the global economy finally gains some traction I think that more people will turn back to the stock market and away from the overheated property market. If you are looking for capital gains, I think that the stock market offers far more opportunity at the moment than property. So many sectors are beaten down and unloved, just waiting for sentiment to turn to bounce back. I think that people need to be cautious about picking particular stocks, but these days there are so many ETFs available that it is possible to diversify very easily and with limited capital.

IMO the current attitude to the stock market feels a little like it did back in 2002 after the dot com bust. Then, in 2003, things started to turn around. I have absolutely no doubt that they will again.
 
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Hi noirua, I agree that the downturn in commodities prices and the subsequent collapse of mining stocks across the board has made the stock market look very risky and unappealing, especially when real estate prices seem to be going in only one direction: up.

The reality is that property is still the hot market in Australia, and the stock market has suffered, particularly with retail investors, as available investment capital gets thrown into residential real estate.



Restrictions on the length of posts in stock threads have been gone for almost five years now. Of course, I would prefer that more content be posted than less, but it is no longer mandatory that posts in stock threads contain a minimum amount of content.

I think the slowdown in posting in recent times is largely due to a general disinterest in the stock market. Real estate investment has become a bit of a national obsession and the stock market has gone off the boil, firstly due to the GFC and then to the global collapse in commodities prices. Meanwhile, the media articles on real estate appear almost daily; "Australia's Most Undervalued Suburbs", "Real Estate Prices: How Has Your Suburb Performed?", "The Nation's Cheapest Beachside Real Estate", and so on.

All bubbles eventually end, and when the global economy finally gains some traction I think that more people will turn back to the stock market and away from the overheated property market. If you are looking for capital gains, I think that the stock market offers far more opportunity at the moment than property. So many sectors are beaten down and unloved, just waiting for sentiment to turn to bounce back. I think that people need to be cautious about picking particular stocks, but these days there are so many ETFs available that it is possible to diversify very easily and with limited capital.

IMO the current attitude to the stock market feels a little like it did back in 2002 after the dot com bust. Then, in 2003, things started to turn around. I have absolutely no doubt that they will again.

Whoah. Nice level of confidence there Joe. 2002. :xyxthumbs
 
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