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The single most decisive factor why you will vote for who you do

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Eager, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Eager

    Eager Well-Known Member

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    Forget about the combination of broken promises, asylum seekers, pink batts, women, or on the other side Abbott, Abbott, Abbott and Abbott ”“ what is the single most important issue that will compel you to vote one way or the other in November 2013?

    What is more important to you policy-wise over all else?

    I lean left, but have swung, and I am not scared of the implementation of the carbon tax. At the end of the day the most important thing to do is to look out for #1, and the very best way I can do that is to do my level best to stay in my job above all else. It sustains my family and my lifestyle! My workplace is carbon neutral despite choofing huge amounts of visible emissions, my house is energy efficient and generates some of its own requirements, and combined tax cuts will actually make us richer despite rising energy costs. I work in manufacturing but our foreign owners continue to heavily invest here in their quest to become a major regional player. I am not concerned by people from overseas lobbing here by boat; I do not fear them, and as a compassionate human being, if a family of them moved next door I would probably go over and give them a hug. Pink batts were not an issue for me and I will always maintain my opinion that it was a brilliant scheme poorly implemented and managed, and taken advantage of by rogues.

    I fully understand the increasing collapse in the Labor vote. A lot has gone wrong. Even I am not as steadfast as I once was. But the single biggest issue for me, which will no doubt not come to light until October 2013, is workplace relations.

    During the ill-conceived coalition Work Choices proposal from several years ago, my employer (different owner but same managers) addressed the workforce directly with a promise to (actual words) “Screw us to the wall” in an effort to increase profits. That is what I am most fearful of. I don’t deserve that - in over 30 years I have never struck in a push for higher pay; the only time ever lost has been in direct response to the employer being in breach of the agreement, riding roughshod, and has only totalled a handful of days over the decades. Why should employers be given free licence to strip away everything that makes a job in a hot and noisy factory bearable?

    I feel for retail and hospitality workers. Because the boss is unable to compete with the internet, he expects his workers to work casually, split or double-split shifts for single time on any day of the week, public, I repeat public holidays included. There is a reason for penalty rates - it is designed to be a penalty after all. If it is not viable to open the shop on certain days, then DON’T.

    I genuinely look forward to the next election to see if a viable alternative to the present government exists, but my vote will hinge solely on workplace relations.

    Please, stick to a single policy issue ”“ what will decide your vote?
     
  2. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    Good thread, Eager, and a good post to start it.

    You concede you will mainly look to what is going to most benefit you. I think we all do this but many cloak this fundamental need for self preservation with altruistic sounding adornment.

    Because the workplace isn't a concern for me and because I'm financially OK, I think I'd say the biggest single issue for me is the Nanny State.

    It's why I'm philosphically a liberal in that the small 'l' liberal believes in individuals largely taking responsibility for their own outcomes.

    Obviously a society has to cater for those who are unable to do this, i.e. the physically and mentally disabled, but those folk aside, it's my belief that a better society results from encouraging individuals to make valid decisions for themselves.

    Socialist governments, on the other hand, want to blanket everyone together in a highly rule-driven society. This stifles creativity. individual strength of mind, and entrepreneurism.

    Interested to hear what others regard as their biggest single issue.
     
  3. Bill M

    Bill M Self Funded Retiree

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    I will vote for any single party that will promise and support the completion of the NBN project, as it is currently planned and in it's entirety. Any party against it won't get my vote.
     
  4. Tightwad

    Tightwad Well-Known Member

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    None of the issues doing the rounds have appealed to me in previous elections.. I've worked with people with disabilities and know that people who are carers are at their wits end, anything useful done in this area would get my vote.

    Re the nanny state - I think both sides are guilty of introducing their share of harsh rules.
     
  5. skyQuake

    skyQuake Well-Known Member

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    nice try Eager... or should I say JULIA?
     
  6. cynic

    cynic Well-Known Member

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    Freedom of speech.

    Defamatory and bigotry considerations aside, I have the utmost contempt for any party that attempts to remove or unduly inhibit this basic human right.
     
  7. Sitar

    Sitar Member

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    For me, the biggest voting factor is protection of our environment. This supports all of us - every aspect of our lives depends on a healthy environment.
     
  8. wayneL

    wayneL Rotaredom

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    (If I still lived in Oz)

    For me it is about basic platforms, the root ideology. None of the major parties suit me perfectly (The right hand side of Social Liberalism with a yearning for Classical Liberalism).

    It's a matter of choosing the best fit and/or eliminating those most offensive to me.

    That drops Labor and The Greens Straight off the bat. That leaves the Liberals... and that's about all have to say about them at the moment.
     
  9. craft

    craft Can't re Member

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    I would vote for a big picture person whose ideology is close to mine. They don’t come along very often. Leaves you wondering who to vote for in-between times.

    I would vote for a big picture person whose ideology is close to mine. They don’t come along very often. Leaves you wondering who to vote for in-between times.

    Both major parties lean centre enough for me that I could vote either way depending on the calibre of the leader (leadership team).

    Maybe we are going to need a darker day to see a true leader emerge from the wings.

    This interview is worth a listen even if you hate Keating and Labor.


    http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2012/04/12/3475824.htm?site=conversations
     
  10. McLovin

    McLovin Well-Known Member

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    I vote for whoever has a plan and the drive to implement it. Unfortunately, neither side currently does. It seems that politicians are just media focused middle managers. Monday's focus group is Tuesday's policy initiative. People whinge about the Labor party but the alternative doesn't look that appealling. I actually believe that the best in the Parliament right now is my own MP, Turnbull. He's arrogant enough to look through the next news cycle and try and see the big picture and implement reforms that are needed (carrying on what Hawke/Keating did). His ideas fall pretty much in line with my own, social liberalism with fiscal conservatiness.

    The differences between the two big parties in Australia is fairly small, although they way many carry on you'd think it was communism against facism.
     
  11. Miss Hale

    Miss Hale Well-Known Member

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    Great thread! Very interesting replies :)

    For me voting isn't based on a single issue anymore (although it was when I was younger). What I am looking for is a government that will basically leave me alone to get on with my life and keeps its nose out of my business and not levy too many taxes/spend too much money. The smaller the government the better IMO, it's a necessary evil as far as I'm concerned. I don't want a government that 'does things' and the word reform sends shivers down my spine. As soon as you tinker with things in one area you have to change things somewhere else and everything ends up a big complicated and costly mess. A welfare state is a recipe for a disaster IMO (and not just economically) and it's far better if people learn to stand on their own two feet. IMO we expect things of the governement that were once provided by family, friends, community and churches but of course the government provides these things very badly and then we all complain (not surprsingly). Anyway, the only party at the moment that even comes near to what I want from a governement is the Liberals so they will get my vote. I'm not overly enamoured with the Libs but the are the best of a bad lot.
     
  12. joea

    joea Well-Known Member

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    I would probably vote for the person who goes to Church, especially if it was for PM.:D
    joea
     
  13. Calliope

    Calliope Well-Known Member

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    I would not vote for a government which has been corrupted by the Greens and crooked union officials and was elected on a lie.
     
  14. Starcraftmazter

    Starcraftmazter Well-Known Member

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    Well let's see here. Out of the 3 major parties, ALP, LNP and Greens...


    I support freedom and liberty. ALP wants to censor the Internet, Greens & LNP oppose.
    -1 ALP
    +1 LNP, Greens

    I support the free markets. None of the major parties even remotely support the free markets.
    -1 to All

    I would like a strong economy. Now this is a big one.

    Both LNP and ALP are adamant to keep the housing bubble that is destroying our economy going. The Greens have no policies on this, which is inadequate but not as bad.
    -1 to LNP and ALP

    LNP wants miners to steal our national resources. Greens want to tax them property and establish a SWF to save the riches for future generations and put downwards pressure on our currency. ALP wants to waste the money now, which is in no way helpful.
    -1 to LNP, ALP
    +1 Greens


    Most importantly I want a Federal government which possesses sovereignty over the issue of the nation's currency, instead of borrowing said currency from private institutions at interest which must be paid by the taxpayers - for the use of their own currency. Unfortunately nobody from any party understand economics near well enough to even have a clue.
    -1 to all.


    Australia has the worst infrastructure in the developed world. This mandates significant public investment in telecommunications on account of it being a natural monopoly - which means it is one of the few things government is obligated to do on account of the private sector being incapable of doing it. LNP wants us to live in the dark ages, and force people to concentrate around the CBDs of large cities creating traffic, social problems, impeding productivity and forcing up the prices of inner-city property. ALP and the Greens support Australia having only what every other developed country has, which will significantly aid the de-centralisation of cities.
    +1 ALP, greens
    -1 LNP

    I would like significant tax cuts to small and medium sized businesses. Preferably only banks and miners should have to pay tax, as it makes zero logical sense to tax any other business since every other business makes profit based on their own creations and innovations which the state has nothing to do with and thus has no right taking any part of their profit. No party supports this.
    -1 to all

    I want a small government. All major parties want a big government.
    -1 to All

    I want a neutral country living in peace and prosperity akin to Switzerland - the richest country on the planet, instead of blowing taxpayer money to fight oil wars for foreign powers. Both ALP and LNP will follow USA anywhere, never questioning whether they are morally nor ethically correct. Greens is the only major party that wants peace and neutrality.
    -1 to LNP, ALP
    +1 Greens

    I want significant reforms of both the education and healthcare systems. I do not want more money thrown at them, only to wonder later why they are performing worse. I do not want public healthcare, and I want it eliminated immediately.
    -1 to all for wanting to throw money and not reform


    I want democracy. A government of the people, by the people - representing the interests of the people. Both ALP and LNP get significantly lobbied by corporations which do not represent taxpayers, and have no right to influence public policy. Both ALP and LNP have in their time enacted legislation which was in the interests of private corporations and against the interest of Australian citizens. Do this day, both parties continue to support this method of governance. Even worse, both ALP and LNP represent the interests of foreign companies - such as US publishers, over the interests of Australians. This cannot be forgiven. On the other hand, I can not think of any instance where the Greens have supported the interests of foreign companies over the interests of Australian citizens.
    -1 to ALP and LNP


    So the totals...

    Greens: -1
    ALP: -9
    LNP: -9


    I did not add them up as I went along, so I had no idea this would be the result.

    But all in all, it confirms what I have known for some time now, that both ALP and LNP suck equally bad, and that Greens are definitively the lesser of the three evils. According to what's most important to me of course :cool:
     
  15. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976 Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting to see someone who (I assume) is a Green voter who also sees mining as the primary (only?) source of national wealth.

    I'm not saying it's wrong or right, but it's an interesting view I think.

    For me, the single greatest issue would be overall competence. That is the ability to firstly comprehend, and then implement, whatever policies they currently have.

    On that score I'd have to put Labor as clearly the worst by a large margin. Greens and Liberal could both be described as understanding the implications of their own policies and having sufficient competence to implement them. Whether or not I agree with those policies is another matter, but at least the party itself seems to understand what the likely outcome will be.

    I just don't see the ALP as particularly relevant or even competent at the moment. If I wanted socialist policies then the Greens do it better than Labor. If I want to go the other way then the Liberals are a more credible choice than Labor. The ALP has become the party which is wedged in the middle and which represents practically nobody.

    For the record, I am a current Union member and work in an industry (and for a specific employer) in which most workers would traditionally be "rusted on" Labor voters and who would absolutely despise the Greens. But Labor are clearly incompetent (at best) at this point in time and thus not a serious option (at least not unless the actual policies of others are so bad as to make Labor's incompetence preferable - possible but unlikely). :2twocents
     
  16. Smurf1976

    Smurf1976 Well-Known Member

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    Carbon tax is an obvious and very large example of that.

    Foreign companies gain whilst Australian citizens and business pay increased costs. That is the underlying main objection that many have to the tax - it primarily benefits foreign companies at the expense of Australians.

    If it were simply a tax to help the environment then I doubt that many would have a real issue with it. :2twocents
     
  17. Glen48

    Glen48 Money can't buy Poverty

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    Any one who votes should be charged for assisting to commit a crime and if that party is elected then charged for being an accessory after the fact.
    While you keep voting they will keep using you as a door mat.
     
  18. drsmith

    drsmith Well-Known Member

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    The Greens have done Labor over very well in this regard.
     
  19. Starcraftmazter

    Starcraftmazter Well-Known Member

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    That is a very interesting concept, I admit that have not considered it from that perspective.

    Although I would not suggest that the Greens have decided to conduct the Carbon Tax for foreign interests, and I do not believe the Greens get political donations from let's say Chinese steel manufacturers for this.

    It is a tax to help the environment. It also does increases business costs. Unfortunately nothing in life is that simple so as to not have drawbacks.


    Overall I would put this down to general economic incompetence rather than representing foreign interests though. And because the other major parties have conducted policies which far outweigh the carbon tax in their negative economic implications, I am included to ignore this particular policy for the sake of wanting to fix much bigger and more long-standing economic problems with our nation.

    Of course since no party offers to fix those other problems, I must wonder whether this is literally the only relevant economic policy over which we can choose politicians and thereby influence the health of our nation's economy :sly:

    I myself would personally not be satisfied by such a predicament, and I would not be satisfied for having that little influence in an allegedly democratic country. And so I refuse to be subjected to having to choose politicians based on this one policy agenda which is trumped by what I consider bigger issues.
     
  20. Julia

    Julia In Memoriam

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    You don't want any public healthcare???
    Do you want to close down all the public hospitals?

    What are you proposing as an alternative?
     
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